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5

The goal of make/cmake is precisely to avoid using batch scripts to compile your program. Make let you execute shell commands, but comes with built-in dependency resolution, and check whether each target needs to be rebuilt. It also handle multi threaded compilation (assuming you wrote your Makefile correctly) CMake does everything make does, but also ...


3

Instead of setting compiler flags directly, you should be using a current CMake version and the <LANG>_VISIBILITY_PRESET properties instead. This way you can avoid compiler specifics in your CMakeLists and improve cross platform applicability (avoiding errors such as supporting GCC and not Clang).


3

The release and debug versions can be handled in two different ways, depending on whether you provide an IMPORTED library or only a list of files in the CPLEX_LIBRARIES variable: for the IMPORTED library you should use the install(...EXPORT...) cand install(EXPORT ...) commands which handle this automatically by setting the appropriate config-dependent ...


2

If you have cmake v2.8.8 or higher, you may use ninja as an alternative of GNU make mkdir build cd build cmake -G Ninja .. ninja # Parallel build (no need -j12) or mkdir build cd build cmake -G Ninja .. cmake --build . # Parallel build using ninja ninja uses by default all available cores and optimizes IO accesses. However, its JSON ...


2

Is it normal behavior that I get MSVC and MSVC_VERSION from toolchain file empty? Yes. Variables initialized after project command. This is where toolchain read also. Try to add some extra messages: cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.0) message(STATUS "Before project: MSVC(${MSVC})") project(Foo) message(STATUS "After project: MSVC(${MSVC})") Result: ...


2

TL;DR Use toolchain In depth an option (-DUSE32bit=true) This is not scalable I guess. So what if you want to build N projects? You have to add N options. build types (-DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=release32) This may work well. But in my opinion you're mixing unrelated stuff. Also I'm sure you have to adapt find_package behaviour by setting ...


2

variables in cmake are limited to the scope of the directory they are in plus their subdirectories. This, calling find_module() in the gamelib subdirectory does not find that module for use in the main directory. The preferred way to propagate include directory dependencies is to add them to the target (in the gamelib directory), like this: ...


2

The message about using IMPORTED targets actually refers to the generated targets that Qt5's CMake modules provide for you, not that you should be setting the IMPORTED property on the target_link_libraries macro. For example, something like: target_link_libraries(${myProjectName} Qt5::Core Qt5::Widgets) will take care of adding all the necessary include ...


2

Turning my comment into an answer CMake does support adding the appropriate configuration to paths in multi-configuration environments with generator expressions (see e.g. CMake - Accessing configuration parameters of multiple-configuration generators) And arguments to target_link_libraries() support the use of generator expressions. So in your case you ...


2

You got it pretty much right. The write CMakeLists.txt > cmake > make sequence is correct. Regarding different configurations (Debug vs. Release), you have to differentiate between multi-config generators (Visual Studio, XCode), and single-config generators (everything else). With the multi-config generators, you generate one buildsystem (e.g. solution ...


2

To add multiple commands, CPACK_NSIS_EXTRA_INSTALL_COMMANDS needs to be set to a multi-line string: list ( APPEND CPACK_NSIS_EXTRA_INSTALL_COMMANDS ... ... string (REPLACE ";" "\n" CPACK_NSIS_EXTRA_INSTALL_COMMANDS "${CPACK_NSIS_EXTRA_INSTALL_COMMANDS}") include(CPack)


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My eventual solution was to make the output .h file an input to the executable. This way is correct. It actually states, that building executable depends on given file, and, if that file is OUTPUT for some add_custom_command(), this command will be executed before building executable. Another way is to generate needed headers at configuration stage ...


1

CMake, make and all those other build tools just execute a sequence of commands. If you can replicate the commands without actually calling CMake, then you will get the same end result. BUT... those tools are used by developers for a reason. Typically the sequence of commands varies from system to system in non-trivial ways. The build system will prevent ...


1

Turning my comments into an answer Collecting your source files with file(GLOB ...) Yes, CMake won't know about new or deleted source files when collecting your source files with the file(GLOB ...) command. This is a known restriction with CMake. I've changed my CMake project(s) to list all source files individually exactly because of this. Out of ...


1

You can use the ExternalProject module for this. It's designed to allow building of external dependencies - even ones which don't use CMake. Here's a useful article on using it. So say you have your "common-rust" subdirectory and its Cargo.toml contains: [package] name = "rust_example" version = "0.1.0" [lib] name = "rust_example" crate-type = ...


1

Found the proper solution (which was, as expected, simple) in this old post: http://www.cmake.org/pipermail/cmake/2010-November/041072.html The gist is to use the actual file in target_link_libraries, so its timestamp is checked. So no need for intermediate or custom dependencies: set(AdaTestLib ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/libadatest.a) ...


1

Unfortunately, it seems there is no straightforward and clean way to do that. From one side the only useful function of create_test_sourcelist is to generate a test driver: a (stupid pretty simple, naive and with lack of abilities to hack/extend) C/C++ translation unit based on ${cmake-prefix}/share/cmake/Templates/TestDriver.cxx.in (and there is no way to ...


1

When building project files with CMake, you have to make sure to install all dependencies and (usually) use the compiler suggested in the docs of whatever source code you are building project files for. In this case, you'll need Qt 4.x installed, along with the Visual C++ 2008 compiler. After doing that, you should be able to tell CMake to use that version ...


1

Answering the revised question in your comment (how can I pass different values), so values other then CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE`: There's no extra machinery for this. If the variable is project specific, you just set the variable: set(MYLIB_SOME_OPTION OFF) add_subdirectory(mylib) If it's more general, you need to revert it: ...


1

There's a convention for CMake modules: snake-case function_or_macro() is implemented in CamelCase FunctionOrMacro.cmake file. So when in doubt, use CamelCase. And use verbs, nouns are for classes.


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Use either the PREFIX or the OUTPUT_NAME target properties: set_target_properties(new_thing PROPERTIES PREFIX "") or set_target_properties(new_thing PROPERTIES OUTPUT_NAME "new_thing")


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Build and install leptonica from a separate CMakeLists.txt. Alternatively, you can use the same CMakeLists and selectively enable either the ExternalProject-section or the main section of your CMakeLists with a control variable (-DMYPROJECT_INSTALL_DEPS=1) You can trigger the configure/build steps of leptonica from shell script, or call cmake from the main ...


1

First let me describe what to do for GLFW. See the notes below for variations. Build GLFW. As the official GLFW head's CMake support is currently broken, use this shaxbee fork: git clone https://github.com/shaxbee/glfw.git cmake -Hglfw -Bbuild/glfw -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=inst -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=Release cmake --build build/glfw --target install --config ...


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As this post is already a bit old: My approach i have settled down to is writing a parallelmake.sh script for Unix Makefiles based Generators This is done here: https://github.com/gabyx/ApproxMVBB And the relevant parts in the the cmake file: https://github.com/gabyx/ApproxMVBB/blob/master/CMakeLists.txt#L89 #Add some multithreaded build support ...


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Build the external dependency first. add a function call to find your external library. That can either be FindGLFW.cmake with find_package if you can find that or write it yourself using find_library et al. More information about including external libraries can be found in the CMake wiki Add the includes and libraries to your Example executable. This is ...


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CMake probably can not determine linker language for target myapp, because the target does not contain any source files with recognized extensions. add_executable(myapp vmime) should be probably replaced by add_executable(myapp ${VerifyCXX}) Also this command set_target_properties(${TARGET} PROPERTIES LINKER_LANGUAGE Cxx) cannot be succesfull, ...


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You can follow this tutorial this has A-Z steps how to configure Aquila in Visual studio



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