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Make sure you have a correctly spelled "using" statement for the namespace. If you've written the using statement only for a particular block, you have to implicitly declare the namespace when debugging or even coding out of that block to access the the namespace.


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Here are a few things I tried that didn't work: On the project settings for ProjectA, on the Code Contracts tab, I tried adding ...ProjectB\bin\Debug\CodeContracts to the field Extra Contract Library Paths. This did not change anything. I also tried manually adding a reference to ProjectB.Contacts.dll. This turned my FileNotFoundException into a ...


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Regarding 2: The documentation is pretty good, take a look at 6.6.10 Filtering Warning Messages: To instruct the static contract checker not to emit a particular class of warnings for a method (a type, an assembly), annotate the method (the type, the assembly) with the attribute: ...


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Can you avoid the warning with this code? var res = Enumerable.Range(0, 100).Select(i => i).Take(1); //execute one query with TOP1 and store in memory Contract.Assume(res.Any()); //or res.Count() > 0 //query already in memory return res.First(); //query already in memory


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Since this solves the problem and is still not that ugly as one might have thought initially, I'm posting it as an answer (if one has better ideas I'm open for your suggestions though): static public int Q() { var e = Enumerable.Range(0, 100) .Select(i => i); Contract.Assume(e.Any()); return e.First(); } So I should not have to ...


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You surely need Unit testing. With code contracts, you can only have your static contract verification. There's much more you can do when running your code. For example, say you are testing a class that depends on IConnectionProvider. What happens when your GetConnection throws? Code contracts won't help you with that. Ideally you'd be testing the public ...


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I would say no. By using code contracts you are defining what your code is supposed to do and checking that it is doing it. The unit test does the same thing for the most part so I believe it is redundant to the point that it is not cost effective to write both.


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You are getting this error because Code Contracts cannot verify that calling Initialize() will result in IsInitialized returning true. This is because there is no code in the body of Initialize() that sets the value of IsInitialized to true, hence the analyzer is warning you that the code is assuming IsInitialized is true on entry to Initialize(), and that ...


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When calling out to other methods, code contracts relies on what has been explicitly stated. As you are suggesting, it could probably work this out in some cases but in general, do you really want it to? For a trivial example like this, it does make sense, but in general, just because a method currently doesn't return null that doesn't mean that the author ...


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I am not familiar with "CodeContracts" but I will give this a try. It may be because you are Dim'ing something, but are dividing it in the same line, so "CodeContracts" may think that, "Oh, this line is Dim'ing something, move on to next line." By this I mean, that the "CodeContract" is looking for an actual line of code that is just dividing. For example: ...



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