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20

Found it! (accidentally, while reading "Hacker's guide to python") OpenStack Hacking Style Checks project named hacking introduces several unique flake8 extensions. There is hacking_import_groups among them (related commit). Example: requirements tox flake8 hacking (from the master branch): $ git clone https://github.com/openstack-dev/hacking.git $ cd ...


9

Have a look at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/isort or https://github.com/timothycrosley/isort isort parses specified files for global level import lines (imports outside of try / excepts blocks, functions, etc..) and puts them all at the top of the file grouped together by the type of import: Future Python Standard Library Third Party ...


8

flake8 has a flake8-print plugin specifically for the task: flake8-print Check for Print statements in python files. DEMO: $ cat test.py s = "test" print s $ flake8 test.py test.py:2:1: T001 print statement found.


8

Pylint just released 1.4.0, which includes a spell-checker. Here is the initial pull-request. Note that, to make the checker work, you need to install pyenchant python module and have an enchant library installed system-wide. On mac, it can be installed via brew: $ brew install enchant By default, the spelling pylint checker is turned off. You can enable ...


7

If for some reason you don't want to use flake8-print as suggested by @alecxe you can roll your own using the ast module - which makes use of Python's compiler to parse the file so you can reliably find print (instead of lines just starting with print): Code: import ast with open('blah.py') as fin: parsed = ast.parse(fin.read()) for node in ...


7

You can use type traits ie std::is_same here : static_assert( std::is_same<int, decltype( returnValue ) >:: value , "Error, Bad Type"); Demo here.


6

Since you want to do this statically, you can use the ast module to parse the code and then scan it for any occurrence of the deprecated code with a subclass of the NodeVisitor class. Like so: import ast, sys class UsingMessageAttr(ast.NodeVisitor): error_object_names = [] def visit_Attribute(self, node): if (node.attr == 'message' and ...


6

In your case, a little bit of looping wouldn't hurt at all. In fact, as a general rule, whenever you have to repeat something more than twice, try to make it a loop. n = 5 for i in range(1, n+1): obj_id = request.GET('rank' + str(i), '') ballot = BallotStats.objects.get(object_id=obj_id) ballot.score += n - i + 1 ballot.save()


6

The biggest problem is not the style of the code - it is that you are making 10 queries: 5 for getting the objects and 5 for updating them. Filter out objects using __in at once: @login_required def submission_set_rank(request): keys = {'rank1': 5, 'rank2': 4, 'rank3': 3, 'rank4': 2, 'rank5': 1} ranks = [request.GET.get(key,'') for key in keys] ...


5

If I were you I would try to use something like ESLint. The ES stands for ECMAScript, which is where the rules for the JS language come from. Every single rule in ESLint is standalone (so you can use what you like), and you can use the default rules as a guideline or skeleton to create your own rule and plug it in. Try ESLint.


5

flake8 is a perfect tool for the task: it is a wrapper around pep8, pyflakes and mccabe. You can run flake8 against files, directories and specific diffs also: git log -p HEAD~10..HEAD~9 | flake8 --diff If your project is hosted on github or bitbucket, you can sign up for Scrutinizer service - it is a continuous inspection platform that has a lot of ...


4

autoflake is a tool specifically for the job: autoflake removes unused imports and unused variables from Python code. Demo: imagine you have a test.py script with the following content: import os import sys print "Hello, world!" os and sys are unused imports here After running the following command in terminal: $ autoflake --in-place ...


4

There is a user manual on sonarqube wiki : http://docs.codehaus.org/display/SONAR/SonarQube+in+Eclipse


4

You won't be able to implement all MISRA/JSF rules and directives as cppcheck rules, mostly only the straightforward ones restricting certain C language features and constructions or that are style-related (some that come to mind: spaces before/after ./->, # of arguments on a single line, use of unions to provide different methods of accessing memory, ...


4

We are using SonarQube as well. You can install some free plugins that might help you out. With SCM activity and SCM stats plugins you can view statistics from blame infos. I recommend you the CodeAnalyzer for SonarQube plugin, that gives you more detailed information of the quality. You can find an online demo here. I think with these three plugins you can ...


4

See http://docs.codehaus.org/display/SONAR/Narrowing+the+Focus, "sonar.inclusions" property.


4

I think the best practice is to be Consistent. All of your options -- except one!, will definitely work and they all seem to be correct, however you need to standardize it in the whole script in order to make it real useful. To break it down a little bit more: If you feel comfortable with Exceptions and you already have some sort of Exception Handling ...


4

You can use basic CSS to show/hide the elements. HTML <div id="container" class="show-buttons"> <button id="button-A" class="btn" data-group="a">...</button> <button id="button-B" class="btn" data-group="b">...</button> <form id="form-A" class="form group-a">...</button> <form id="form-B" ...


3

What about this instead of checking element.equals(): String element = null; if( rawLogText.contains("RequestType") ) { element = "RequestType"; } else if( rawLogText.contains("ResponseType") ) { element = "ResponseType"; } else { return; } //continue the process


3

There are two main types of code post-processing with JavaScript: minification and obfuscation. Minification is done to reduce the size of the code (so that web servers need to transfer fewer bytes to clients, and can therefore save on bandwidth). Minification often involves reducing variables in the code to short characters that are no longer ...


3

No, jshint can't do that. Just do a grep across the sources looking for @author. If you want you could put that in a git pre-commit hook. Or, you could hack JSDoc to error out when creating docs if it encounters @author.


3

As of November 2014, JSHint will recognize a line containing /* globals globvar1, globvar2 */ and silence its warnings about globvar1 and globvar2 being undefined. It's very intuitive - I only discovered it by accident.


3

You can use the --diff option of PEP8, basically prior to commit run git diff and pass the output to PEP8.


3

diff-cover is a tool for running coverage, pep8, and pylint on just the lines you have changed in a commit, rather than on the entire working tree. It sounds like just what you want.


2

Use flake8 tool instead - it is a wrapper around pyflakes, pep8 and mccabe. Besides other features, it has an --exclude option: --exclude=patterns exclude files or directories which match these comma separated patterns (default: .svn,CVS,.bzr,.hg,.git,__pycache__)


2

If you exclude classes in scoverageCompile then they will be ignored for the purposes of counting statements. Let's say you had 2 class files A and B, each with 10 statements, so 20 statements in total. If class A has 10% coverage (1/10), and class B has 90% coverage (9/10), then overall your coverage is 50% (10/20). If you exclude class A, then your ...


2

You can use something like this to handle all the elements in a generic way : final Iterable<ButtonElement> buttons = querySelectorAll('button') .where((ButtonElement b) => b.id.startsWith('button-')); final Iterable<ButtonElement> cancels = querySelectorAll('button') .where((ButtonElement b) => b.id.startsWith('cancel-')); ...


2

in order to keep the code up with your exception handling or ignoring, it's nice to name the exception var as ignored: try { action(); } catch (ExpectedException ignored ) {}


2

I ran into a similar issue and found a few things that sped up our tests by nearly 50%. Configure your test environment to use sqlite Configure the bootstrap.php that phpunit uses to create the schema, load the data fixtures and create a backup of the database file Tests that need a clean database call a restoreDatabase method that is a static global in ...


2

I don't think this theory is 100% correct. Here is some reasons why: Syntax Complexity Although it might seem common sense from the first look that the less code to look at, the easier it is to get the defect, but there is a limit where condensed code become so complicated that although it's fewer in lines, it's way harder to understand. So I guess where ...



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