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136

ANSI encoding is a slightly generic term used to refer to the standard code page on a system, usually Windows. It is more properly referred to as Windows-1252 (at least on Western/U.S. systems, it can represent certain other Windows code pages on other systems). This is essentially an extension of the ASCII character set in that it includes all the ASCII ...


71

Here's a couple of functions (based on Brian Bondy's example) that use WideCharToMultiByte and MultiByteToWideChar to convert between std::wstring and std::string using utf8 to not lose any data. // Convert a wide Unicode string to an UTF8 string std::string utf8_encode(const std::wstring &wstr) { if( wstr.empty() ) return std::string(); int ...


41

I assume you're trying to import this using an Excel Source in the SSIS dialog? If so, the problem is probably that SSIS samples some number of rows at the beginning of your spreadsheet when it creates the Excel source. If on the [ShortDescription] column it doesn't notice anything too large, it will default to a 255 character text column. So to ...


32

Technically, ANSI should be the same as US-ASCII. It refers to the ANSI X3.4 standard, which is simply the ANSI organisation's ratified version of ASCII. Use of the top-bit-set characters is not defined in ASCII/ANSI as it is a 7-bit character set. However years of misuse of the term by the DOS and subsequently Windows community has left its practical ...


31

Elaborating on the answer provided by Brian R. Bondy: Here's an example that shows why you can't simply size the output buffer to the number of wide characters in the source string: #include <windows.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <wchar.h> #include <string.h> /* string consisting of several Asian characters */ wchar_t wcsString[] =...


31

Yes. UTF-8 is CP65001 in Windows (which is just a way of specifying UTF-8 in the legacy codepage stuff). As far as I read ASP can handle UTF-8 when specified that way.


18

This is a good start: The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No Excuses!)


16

A ‘character set’ is just what it says: a properly-specified list of distinct characters. An ‘encoding’ is a mapping between a character set (typically Unicode today) and a (usually byte-based) technical representation of the characters. UTF-8 is an encoding, but not a character set. It is an encoding of the Unicode character set(*). The confusion comes ...


16

I had this issue when importing from a flat, delimited file into SQL Server. The solution was to update the 'OutputColumnWidth' value for the offending column (from the error message). On the 'Choose a Data Source' form in the import wizard, my source was the flat file. On the leftmost pane, choose 'Advanced'. You can then set the properties of ...


15

You use the lpMultiByteStr [out] parameter by creating a new char array. You then pass this char array in to get it filled. You only need to initialize the length of the string + 1 so that you can have a null terminated string after the conversion. Here are a couple of useful helper functions for you, they show the usage of all parameters. #include <...


14

Strictly speaking, there is no such thing as ANSI encoding. The term ANSI is used for several different encodings: ISO 8859-1 Windows CP1252 Current system encoding on a Windows machine (in Win32 API terminology).


12

Thank you all for some very useful answers. I realize the actual question isn't "How can I convert ANY Unicode character into its ASCII fallback" - the question is "how can I convert the Unicode characters my customers are complaining about into their ASCII fallbacks" ? In other words - we don't need a general-purpose solution; we need a solution that'll ...


10

If you want a really brief introduction: Unicode in 5 Minutes Or if you are after one-liners: Unicode: a mapping of characters to integers ("code points") in the range 0 through 1,114,111; covers pretty much all written languages in use UTF7: an encoding of code points into a byte stream with the high bit clear; in general do not use UTF8: an encoding of ...


9

UTF-8 is a better option as it really support all known characters, while with 1252 you might end up with characters that you need missing from it (even in European languages). Apparently, VS2008 saves UTF-8 with a byte order mark - it should be possible to either switch that off, or have the parser recognize it, or strip the BOM somewhere in between.


9

Another way of doing this, in Windows, is by using wordpad.exe: Run wordpad.exe Write your script as you usually do, with accents Choose Save as > Other formats Choose to save it as Text document MS-DOS (*.txt) Change the file extension from .txt to .bat


9

What they mean is probably ISO/IEC 8859-1 (aka Latin-1), ISO-8859-1, ISO/IEC 8859-15 (aka Latin-9) or Windows-1252 (aka CP 1252). All 4 of them have the ä at position 0xE4.


8

ASCII just defines a 7 bit code page with 128 symbols. ANSI extends this to 8 bit and there are several different code pages for the symbols 128 to 255. The naming ANSI is not correct because it is actually the ISO/IEC 8859 norm that defines this code pages. See ISO/IEC 8859 for reference. There are 16 code pages ISO/IEC 8859-1 to ISO/IEC 8859-16. Windows-...


8

Code page 0 is CP_ACP, current Windows ANSI code page. From Windows.pas: {$EXTERNALSYM CP_ACP} CP_ACP = 0; { default to ANSI code page } From MSDN: CP_ACP The current system Windows ANSI code page. This value can be different on different computers, even on the same network. It can be changed on the same computer,...


8

Joel has a nice summary of this: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/Unicode.html And no. if I understand your question correctly it doesn't mean that. When you're converting UTF-8 to a specific code page, it is possible that only some of the characters are going to be converted. What happens to the ones that don't get converted depends on how you call ...


7

As well as the oft-referenced Joel one, I have my own article which looks at it from a .NET-centric viewpoint, just for variety...


7

Your code is correct although I prefer to set the CharSet in code rather than use the meta tag:- <% Response.CharSet = "UTF-8" %> The codepage 65001 does refer to the UTF-8 character set. You would need be make sure that your asp page (and any includes) are saved as UTF-8 if they contain any characters outside of the standard ASCII character set. ...


7

The only time this would be appropriate is if you're writing a kiosk type application where nothing else will run on the system. That change will affect every other application on the system. If you just need to render the characters and can get them into a WideString you can render them in older versions of Delphi by calling the W versions of the Windows ...


7

I had the same problem, and this answer solved it. Basically you have to wrap your script with a bunch of commands to change your terminal codepage, and then to restore it. @echo off for /f "tokens=2 delims=:." %%x in ('chcp') do set cp=%%x chcp 1252>nul :: your stuff here :: chcp %cp%>nul Worked like a charm!


7

You can use the DBXJSON unit which is included in Delphi 2010 uses DBXJSON; const JsonUt8 ='"\u041f\u043e\u0438\u0441\u043a \u043f\u043e \u0444\u0430\u043c\u0438\u043b\u0438\u0438, \u0438\u043c\u0435\u043d\u0438 (\u043e\u0442\u0447\u0435\u0441\u0442\u0432\u0443"'; procedure TForm59.Button1Click(Sender: TObject); var LJSONValue: TJSONValue; begin ...


7

IBM-437 is somewhat special in that it is not only a codepage (i.e. defines what should happen for byte values 128-255), but also redefines some of the ASCII control characters, but only in some contexts. Python maps those problematic codepoints to control characters, and not to the visible characters they were displayed as in some contexts. To convert, you ...


6

In a unix world the utility is called iconv. Not sure if there is a windows equivalent.


6

Once upon a time Microsoft, like everyone else, used 7-bit character sets, and they invented their own when it suited them, though they kept ASCII as a core subset. Then they realised the world had moved on to 8-bit encodings and that there were international standards around, such as the ISO-8859 family. In those days, if you wanted to get hold of an ...


6

The default encoding used by cmd.exe is Cp850 (or whatever "OEM" CP is native to the OS); the system encoding is Cp1252 (or whatever "ANSI" CP is native to the OS). Gory details here. One way to discover the console encoding would be to do it via native code (see GetConsoleOutputCP for current console encoding; see GetACP for default "ANSI" encoding; etc.). ...


6

Here is my look-up table with code, feel free to use it. type TCPData = record CPID: Integer; CPName: String; end; const MaxEncodings = 140; Encodings: Array[0..MaxEncodings - 1] of TCPData = ( (CPID: 37; CPName: 'IBM037'), (CPID: 437; CPName: 'IBM437'), (CPID: 500; CPName: 'IBM500'), (CPID: 708; CPName: 'ASMO-708'), (...



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