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63

This works: (apply str my-char-seq) Basically, str calls toString() on each of its args and then concatenates them. Here we are using apply to pass the characters in the sequence as args to str.


26

Cast is explicit. Coerce is implicit. The examples in Python would be: cast(2, POINTER(c_float)) #cast 1.0 + 2 #coerce 1.0 + float(2) #conversion Cast really only comes up in the C FFI. What is typically called casting in C or Java is referred to as conversion in python, though it often gets referred to as casting because of its similarities to those ...


25

Short answer: check out how Matrix is doing it. The idea is that coerce returns [equivalent_something, equivalent_self], where equivalent_something is an object basically equivalent to something but that knows how to do operations on your Point class. In the Matrix lib, we construct a Matrix::Scalar from any Numeric object, and that class knows how to ...


25

Quoting directly from the help page for factor: To transform a factor f to its original numeric values, as.numeric(levels(f))[f] is recommended and slightly more efficient than as.numeric(as.character(f)).


21

I think "casting" shouldn't be used for Python; there are only type conversion, but no casts (in the C sense). A type conversion is done e.g. through int(o) where the object o is converted into an integer (actually, an integer object is constructed out of o). Coercion happens in the case of binary operations: if you do x+y, and x and y have different types, ...


18

Catching thrown exceptions is quite different from passing arguments to functions. There are similarities, but there are also subtle differences. The 3 main differences are: exceptions are always copied at least once (not possible to avoid at all) catch clauses are examined in the order they are declared (not best-fit) they are subject to fewer forms of ...


16

You can combine the two functions; coerce to characters thence to numerics: > fac <- factor(c("1","2","1","2")) > as.numeric(as.character(fac)) [1] 1 2 1 2


10

WHERE promo_detail_store_id in (8214, 8217, 4952, 8194, ...) means WHERE promo_detail_store_id = 8214 OR promo_detail_store_id = 8217 OR promo_detail_store_id = 4952 OR promo_detail_store_id = 8194 OR ... WHERE promo_detail_store_id in ('8214, 8217, 4952, 8194, ...') means WHERE promo_detail_store_id = '8214, 8217, 4952, 8194, ...' '8214, ...


10

Like @kosmikus said, both Int8 and Int16 are implemented using an Int#, which is 32 bit-wide on 32-bit architectures (and Word8 and Word16 are Word# under the hood). This comment in GHC.Prim explains this in more detail. So let's find out why this implementation choice results in the behaviour you see: > let x = unsafeCoerce (-1 :: Int8) :: Word8 > ...


9

Ah, I just remembered the identity meta-function. It is possible to write operator typename identity<void (Testable::*)() const>::type() const; with the following definition of identity: template <typename T> struct identity { typedef T type; }; You could argue that identity still uses a typedef, but this solution is "good" enough for ...


9

So why my explicit cast work, and the one inside .Cast<> doesn't? Your explicit cast knows at compile time what the source and destination types are. The compiler can spot the explicit conversion, and emit code to invoke it. That isn't the case with generic types. Note that this isn't specific to Cast or LINQ in general - you'd see the same thing if ...


8

If your question is really about whether the types of the argument and the parameter match, then the answer is yes. typedef does not introduce a new type, it only creates alias for an existing one. Variable b has type unsigned int, just like the parameter, even though b is declared using typedef-name blatherskite. Your example is not very good for ...


8

It's not that Ruby can't, it's more that it won't. It's a strongly typed language, which means you need to take care of type conversions yourself. This is helpful in catching errors early that result from mixing incompatible types, but requires a little more care and typing from the programmer.


8

Paragraph 15.3/3 of the C++11 Standard defines the exact conditions for a handler to be a match for a certain exception object, and these do not allow user-defined conversions: A handler is a match for an exception object of type E if — The handler is of type cv T or cv T& and E and T are the same type (ignoring the top-level cv-qualifiers), ...


7

The example code you pasted doesn't actually trigger the error. The source attribute as written there won't try to coerce anything. I assume however that one of the roles you mention has an attribute with coerce => 1 defined. In Moose types, and thus coercions, are global. When combined with the the fact that Moose builds a class dynamically you end up ...


6

What's wrong with a free function? std::string convert(PA_Unichar *libOutput); std::string myString = convert(theLibraryFunction()); Edit answering to the comment: As DrPizza says: Everybody else is trying to plug the holes opened up by implicit conversions through replacing them with those explicit conversion which you call "visual clutter". As to ...


6

The C standard doesn't have very hard rules for what you're trying to do. Here's the paragraph in question, from Section 6.3.1 Arithmetic operands (specifically Section 6.3.1.4 Real floating and integer): When a finite value of real floating type is converted to an integer type other than _Bool, the fractional part is discarded (i.e., the value is ...


6

Forewords Let me give a different solution that doesn't rely on any Java based library but only a pure Scala one. Actually, as discussed in the comments of @Steve's results Play 2's scala version was using Jerkson for de/serializing Json to domain model. Where Jerkson is a DSL wrapper around a very good Java library for handling Json. Answer The above ...


6

You can convert an array of strings into an array of floats (with NaNs) using np.genfromtxt: In [83]: np.set_printoptions(precision=3, suppress=True) In [84]: np.genfromtxt(np.array(['1','2','3.14','1e-3','b','nan','inf','-inf'])) Out[84]: array([ 1. , 2. , 3.14 , 0.001, nan, nan, inf, -inf]) Here is a way to identify "numeric" ...


5

From perldoc overload: overload::StrVal(arg) Gives string value of arg as in absence of stringify overloading. sub can_stringify { my ($obj) = @_; return "$obj" ne overload::StrVal($obj); } Note that overload::Method is not appropriate here because: 'bool', '""', '0+', If one or two of these operations are not overloaded, ...


5

There is the method ProxyGenerator.instantiateAggregateFromBaseClass that be able to accept constructor arguments. But unfortunately, the as operator will not call it for you. So, the answer is no, at the moment. FYI, "as" will invoke one of DefaultGroovyMethods.asType() methods, but none of them calls the instantiateAggregateFromBaseClass you wanted.


5

The common solution is to have a separate file just to declare type constraints and their coercions. If you need to make sure that a particular class is loaded -- e.g. to coerce to it -- require it inside your coercion functions. So, something like: package GOBO::Types; use Moose::Util::TypeConstraints; class_type 'GOBO::Node'; coerce 'GOBO::Node', ...


5

You need to cast the pointers. Casting the values simply converts the int to float. Try: *dest = *((float32*)&temp);


5

Your onEnterFrm function is looking to receive an Event, Not a MouseEvent. change private function onEnterFrm(e:MouseEvent):void to private function onEnterFrm(e:Event):void Currently, your onEnterFrm is getting an event where it wants a MouseEvent.


5

The second argument to re.sub() can also be a callable, which lets you do: re.sub(r'(\d+)', lambda match:'%d' % (int(match.group(1))*2), 'test line 123') BTW, there really is no reason to use float over int, as your regex does not include periods and will always be a non-negative integer


5

No. Simply use: String boolAsString; bool b = boolAsString == 'true';


5

Bool has no methods. var val = 'True'; bool b = val.toLowerCase() == 'true'; should be easy enough.


4

Implicit conversions are the devil, anyway. Make it explicit with a converting function call.


4

From ECMAScript Language Specification 11.3 Postfix Expressions Syntax PostfixExpression : LeftHandSideExpression LeftHandSideExpression [no LineTerminator here] ++ LeftHandSideExpression [no LineTerminator here] -- 11.3.1 Postfix Increment Operator The production PostfixExpression : LeftHandSideExpression [no ...



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