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4

Use a custom validator: def t_and_c_validator(node, value): if not value: raise Invalid(node, 'You must agree to the T&C') class MySchema(colander.Schema): t_and_c = colander.SchemaNode( colander.Boolean(), description='Terms and Conditions', widget=deform.widget.CheckboxWidget(), ...


4

So I think the big problem you're having is understanding the separation of concerns of Colander and Deform. Colander is what people like to call a general schema validation library. Which means we define a schema, where each node has a particular data type and some nodes might be required/optional. Colander is then able to validate that schema, and tell ...


3

Look at colander as a tool for 'deserialization/validation from a python dictionary'. A dict in Python can be formed from any structured data format, I guess. In one of my projects I validate data from POST (webob.multidict) data and from JSON file and use the same lines of code: recipe_schema = RecipeSchema() try: appstruct = ...


3

Have you tried using the colander.Length validator? Try to modify your schema with: events = EventList(validator=colander.Length(min=1)) For bad_data this should raise: Invalid: {'events': u'Shorter than minimum length 1'}


3

You might try "missing = colander.null".


2

To the SchemaNode you can provide a title argument. colander.SchemaNode(colander.String(), title='Complete name')


2

You'll need to utilise the dictify method associated with your given SQLAlchemyMapping schema object to convert a given model instance into an appstruct acceptable for rendering your Deform form. So, using your example model, this is what you might do: schema = SQLAlchemyMapping(Group) form = deform.Form(schema, use_ajax=True) my_group = Group(id=1, ...


2

Here is an example of interfield validation. http://deformdemo.repoze.org/interfield/


2

Encountered the same and after digging in, if you look at cornice.util.extract_request_data function, you'll see that its trying to load the body as json json.loads(request.body) so you need to post your data as json: curl -H "Content-Type: application/json" -X POST http://localhost:6543/foo -d '{"foo": "bar"}' HTH


2

To place a validator for all colander fields we can simply do this validator method: def user_DoesExist(node,appstruct): if DBSession.query(User).filter_by(username=appstruct['username']).count() > 0: raise colander.Invalid(node, 'Username already exist.!!') Schema: class UserSchema(CSRFSchema): username = colander.SchemaNode(colander.String(), ...


2

Please consider this solution. import colander class NoneAcceptantNode(colander.SchemaNode): """Accepts None values for schema nodes. """ def deserialize(self, value): if value is not None: return super(NoneAcceptantNode, self).deserialize(value) class Person(colander.MappingSchema): interest = ...


2

In your custom validator you always pass the form as the first parameter to colander.Invalid(). This way you add validation messages to the top of the form, but you do not trigger highlighting of schema nodes / elements. Start using simple validators working on a single schema node/element. exc = colander.Invalid(form["identity_information"], "ID Number %s ...


2

I was out in left field on this one, not even asking the right question for the right area. What I was really after was to have some defaults selected in a multi-select colander SchemaNode. I brought my question over to pylons-discuss Google Group, and they were able to help me out. It came down to using 'set()' when I construct the appstruct in my ...


1

honestly, skipped over most of the question, so hopefully I didn't miss anything too big. Should PUT requests be full records - Yes, absolutely. PUT requests put an entire replacement record at the URI you requested. If you want to perform a partial modification, you should use PATCH (which is surprisingly lesser known). Before PATCH, the theory would be, ...


1

To see a vivid pyramid example application and deform in action look at todopyramid as a part of IndyPy Python Web Shootout. A todo application was implemented in pyramid, django, flask and bottle. I studied the pyramid example - it is well written, shows deform schema validation and uses bootstrap to show validation messages. Find more pyramid tutorials ...


1

You can use Colander independently of cornice. The most basic example for using Colander Schema in a pyramid application I remember you find here: http://docs.pylonsproject.org/projects/pyramid_tutorials/en/latest/humans/zodb/index.html This way you can encapsulate schema validation using colander schemas and validators. A more recent introduction of ...


1

I did that but it doesn't seams to work: class PolicyValidator(SchemaNode): def __init__(self): super(PolicyValidator, self).__init__( Mapping(unknown='preserve'), validator=self.policy_range) # self.add(SchemaNode(Range(min=0, max=0xFFFF), name="preserved")) def policy_range(self, node, policy): for value in ...


1

You are deserializing a cstruct, and it contains a datetime.datetime instance. Colander expects only simple types such as int, float, str, etc. If you make your datetime value a ISO-formatted string, things work just fine: >>> import datetime >>> import colander >>> ...


1

Looking at the documentation, I don't think you can. You could get around the limitation you mentioned by defining your own validator: A validator is a callable which accepts two positional arguments: node and value. It returns None if the value is valid. It raises a colander.Invalid exception if the value is not valid.


1

Tangibly the answer is: def verify_email_validator(form, values): if values['email_address'] != values['verify_email']: raise Invalid(form, 'Email values do not match') class MySchema(MappingSchema): def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs): super(KickEntrySchema, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs) ...


1

The solution is probably to define the schema imperatively: http://docs.pylonsproject.org/projects/colander/en/latest/basics.html#defining-a-schema-imperatively


1

As micheal said, it might not be supported. If you really need it. Here is some pointers. Save your schema in a database by name for example: "PageSchema". Save all of its record in the database with all the needed parameters. You'd have to do something like that: for row in rows: attrinbutes[row['name']] = build_attribute(row) schemas[schema_name] ...



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