Hot answers tagged

28

Create a table and insert the test data: CREATE TABLE `ub` ( `user_id` int(11) NOT NULL, `book_id` varchar(10) NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (`user_id`,`book_id`), UNIQUE KEY `book_id` (`book_id`,`user_id`) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1; insert into ub values (1, 'A'), (1, 'B'), (1, 'C'); insert into ub values (2, 'A'), (2, 'B'), (2, 'C'), ...


28

Have a look at Collaborative filtering or Recommender systems. One simple algorithm is Slope One.


19

A fashionably late response: Pandora and Grooveshark are very different in the algorithm they use. Basically there are two major approaches to recommendation systems - 1. collaborative filtering, and 2. content based. (and hybrid systems) Most systems are based on collaborative filtering. This basically means matching lists of preferences): If I liked ...


13

Programming Collective Intelligence is a nice, approachable introduction to this field.


13

(I am the developer of Taste, which is now part of Apache Mahout) 1) You're really asking for two things here: a) Recommend items I might like b) Favor items that are similar to the thing I am currently looking at. Indeed, Mahout Taste is all about answering a). Everything it does supports systems like this. Take a look at the documentation to get ...


13

First, i have no inside knowledge of S/U's Recommendation Engine. What i do know, i've learned from following this topic for the last few years and from studying the publicly available sources (including StumbleUpon's own posts on their company Site and on their Blog), and of course, as a user of StumbleUpon. I haven't found a single source, authoritative ...


10

Let me explain the procedure that the authors introduced (as I understood it): Input: Training data: users, items, and ratings of users to these items (not necessarily each user rated all items) Target user: a new user with some ratings of some items Target item: an item not rated by target user that we would like to predict a rating for it. Output: ...


9

I am researching the same topic, as I'm working on a project to help people decide how to vote on California's complicated ballot measures. Here are some open-source collaborative filtering engines that I've found: Vogoo (PHP) acts_as_recommendable (Ruby on Rails) Mahout (formerly Taste) (Java) There's also a good overview of these engines here.


9

Spark documentation clearly mentions that MLLib uses native libraries, which need to be present on the nodes. (that is it does not come with spark installation) MLlib uses the jblas linear algebra library, which itself depends on native Fortran routines. You may need to install the gfortran runtime library if it is not already present on your nodes. ...


8

Programming Collective Intelligence is a really user-friendly introduction to the field, with lots of example code in Python. At the very least, it will help set the stage for understanding the math in the academic papers on the topic.


8

Apache Mahout does everything you mention here. It is Java-based, and supports user-based collaborative filtering (among others) with GenericUserBasedRecommender. It is a k-nearest-neighbor algorithm, into which you can plug similarity implementations like PearsonCorrelationSimilarity and others. Look at the org.apache.mahout.cf.taste package and ...


6

This is not actually a "MapReduce" function but it should give you some significant speedup without all of the hassle. I would actually use numpy to "vectorize" the operation and make your life easier. From this you'll just need to loop through this dictionary and apply the vectorized function comparing this item against all others. import numpy as np ...


6

There's a good demo video with explanation (and a link to the author's thesis) at Mapping and visualizing music collections. This approach deals with analyzing the characteristics of the music itself. Other methods, like NetFlix and Amazon, rely on recommendations from other users with similar tastes as well as basic category filtering.


6

The problem is that you don't know which direction "action" is a priori. The factorization is going to find dimensions that explain the most about movies, and, the basis vectors for that feature space that it finds do not necessarily map directly to a pure idea like "action". If you analyze one you may find a basis vector seems to mean "action, and some ...


5

You might want to consider using cosine similarity rather than Pearson correlation. It does not suffer from this problem, and is widely used in the recommender systems literature. The canonical solution to this, described by Herlocker et al. in "Empirical Analysis of Design Choices in Neighborhood-based Collaborative Filtering Algorithms", is to "damp" the ...


5

Algorithm of the Intelligent Web (H Marmanis, D Babenko, Manning publishing) is an introductory text on the subjet. It also covers Searching concepts but its main focus is with classification, recommendation systems and such. This should be a good primer for your project, allowing you to ask the right questions and to dig deeper where things appear more ...


5

(Yes I'm purposely giving another answer.) The other answer is that all these algorithms have strengths and weaknesses and do well on some day but not others. But I had a similar observation about slope-one some time ago and even got some comments from Daniel Lemire who proposed the implementation originally. Consider what happens as the data becomes 100% ...


5

You're looking at the right paper, but, I think you are expecting the algorithm to do something it is not intended to do. It is producing a low-rank approximation to your input as the product of two matrices, but nothing about multiplying matrices clamps the output values. You can clamp, or round the values. You may not want it to because you're getting ...


4

Great paper by Yehuda Koren (on the team that won the Netflix prize): The BellKor Solution to the Netflix Grand Prize (google "GrandPrize2009_BPC_BellKor.pdf"). Couple websites: Trustlet.org Collaborative Filtering tutorials by Dr. Jun Wang Google: item-based top-n recommendation algorithms


4

Instead of writing from scratch take a look at mahout.apache.org. It has the clustering algorithms you are looking for as well as the recommendation algorithms. It works alongside Hadoop, so you can scale it out easily. What this will allow you to do is determine similar documents in a cluster based on your keywords and/or description of the video. ...


4

See SVDRecommender in Apache Mahout. Your question about input format entirely depends on what library or code you're using. There's not one standard. At some level, yes, the code will construct some kind of matrix internally. For Mahout, the input for all recommenders, when supplied as a file, is a CSV file with rows like userID,itemID,rating.


4

(I'm the developer.) If I was stranded on a desert island with just one similarity metric for data without ratings/prefs, it would be log-likelihood. I would generally expect it to be the better similarity metric. The problem with the test you're doing is that, perhaps not at all obviously, it's not meaningful for this kind of recommender / data. RMSE is ...


4

I'm unaware if there is a specific, well known algorithm for this. However this would be my line of thinking: "maximize the number of rated playable (i.e. unseen) questions for all players" means both maximising the number of questions with +5 and the number of not-seen questions from each player. Whatever the algorithm will be, its effectiveness is tied ...


4

To determine similarity between users you can run cosine or pearson similarity (Found in Mahout and everywhere on the net really!) across the user vector. So your data representation should look something like u1 [1,2,3,4,5,6] u2 [35,24,3,4,5,6] u1 [35,3,9,2,1,11] In the point where you want to take multiple items into consideration you can use ...


4

Actually that is one of the sweetspots of a graph database like Neo4j. So if your data model looks like this: user -[:LIKE|:BOUGHT]-> item You can easily get recommendations for an user with a cypher statement like this: start user = node:users(id="doctorkohaku") match user -[r:LIKE]->item<-[r2:LIKE]-other-[r3:LIKE]->rec_item where r.stars ...


4

You might try using an object-to-object collaborative filter instead of a user-to-object filter. Age out related pairs (and low-incidence pairs) over time since they're largely irrelevant in your use case anyway. I did some work on the Netflix Prize back in the day, and quickly found that I could significantly outperform the base model with regard to ...


4

Let's understand Item-to-Item Collaborative Filtering. suppose we have purchase matrix Item1 Item2 ... ItemN User1 0 1 ... 0 User2 1 1 ... 0 . . . UserM 1 0 ... 0 Then we can calculate Item similarity using column vector, e.g use cosine. We have a item similarity symmetry matrix as below ...


4

Create an inverted index that has: customer1: [item1, item3, item8, ...] customer2: [item7, item8, item74, ...] Then you can: Look up an item to get the list of customers who bought it Look up each customer to get the list of items that customer bought Your time per item should go from 2 minutes to less than 2 seconds. It requires more memory for ...


4

Using this Matlab to python code conversion sheet I was able to rewrite NMF from Matlab toolbox library. I had to decompose a 40k X 1k matrix with sparsity of 0.7%. Using 500 latent features my machine took 20 minutes for 100 iteration. Here is the method: import numpy as np from scipy import linalg from numpy import dot def nmf(X, latent_features, ...


4

Scikit-learn does not offer any recommendation system tools. You can give a look at mahout which is giving really easy to start proposition or spark. However recommendation is a problem in itself in machine learning word. It can be regression if you are trying to predict the rate that a user would give to a movie for instance or classification if you want ...



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