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19

The usual solution to this is not to use a converter, but instead to animate the Color of the Brush. However, to do this you need a PropertyPath, which in turn means you need a storyboard: Storyboard s = new Storyboard(); s.Duration = new Duration(new TimeSpan(0, 0, 1)); s.Children.Add(F); Storyboard.SetTarget(F, PulseLogo); ...


11

Solved! private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { SolidColorBrush rootLayerBrush; ColorAnimation animation; rootElementBrush = this.FindResource("RootElementBrush") as SolidColorBrush; // Animate the brush animation = new ColorAnimation(); animation.To = Colors.Green; animation.Duration = new ...


11

Give this a try: <ColorAnimation Storyboard.TargetName="PlayButtonArrow" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Fill.Color" From="White" To="Green" Duration="0:0:5.0" AutoReverse="False"/>


9

Your code worked perfectly for me. I just made minor modifications. <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type Model:Sensor}"> <StackPanel Name="SensorPanel" Background="LightBlue" Width="100" Margin="5"> <TextBlock Text="{Binding Name}"/> <ToggleButton Margin="2" IsChecked="{Binding IsChecked}" Content="Set ...


9

The final part of this puzzle is... DataTriggers. All you have to do is add one DataTrigger to your DataTemplate, bind it to IsCritical property, and whenever it's true, in it's EnterAction/ExitAction you start and stop highlighting storyboard. Here is completely working solution with some hard-coded shortcuts (you can definitely do better): Xaml: ...


7

Try to specify: Storyboard.TargetProperty="BorderBrush.Color" and either specify: BorderBrush="any-non-transparent-color" or in the animation: From="any-non-transparent-color"


6

Please see PropertyPath XAML Syntax: The parentheses indicate that this property in a PropertyPath should be constructed using a partial qualification. It can use an XML namespace to find the type with an appropriate mapping. The ownerType searches types that a XAML processor has access to, through the XmlnsDefinitionAttribute ...


6

For the first one, you could use {StaticResource MyColor} with MyColor defined as such: <Color x:Key="MyColor">#FF00FF00</Color> However, this doesn't solve your problem: you can't bind to animation properties since those properties need to be frozen (unchangeable) for the animation to work. Either try to remove your dependence on a binding, ...


5

One way to do this is to create a style that is applied to your paths which uses a relative source binding in a DataTrigger to check if the mouse is over the parent canvas, e.g. <Style TargetType="Path"> <Style.Triggers> <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor, AncestorType=Canvas}, ...


5

If just for a few animations I would recommend using Visual States. Then you can use GoToAction behavior on the view to trigger different animations. If you are dealing with a lot of similar animations, creating your own behavior would be a better solution. Update I have created a very simple behaivor to give a Rectangle a little color animation. Here is ...


5

I wrote a gradient-function some time ago, maybe it helps you (returns an Array): function gradient(startColor, endColor, steps) { var start = { 'Hex' : startColor, 'R' : parseInt(startColor.slice(1,3), 16), 'G' : parseInt(startColor.slice(3,5), 16), ...


5

Well you can do it simply by this way: var incrementColor = function(color, step){ var colorToInt = parseInt(color.substr(1), 16), // Convert HEX color to integer nstep = parseInt(step); // Convert step to integer if(!isNaN(colorToInt) && !isNaN(nstep)){ ...


4

I used the code that Xin posted, and made a few very minor tweeks (code is below). The only 3 material differences: I created the behavior to work on any UIElement, not just a rectangle I used a PropertyChangedTrigger instead of an EventTrigger. That let's me Monitor the color property on the ViewModel instead of listening for click events. I bound ...


4

I think the issue is that WPF cannot 'smartly' hook up your OnColorAnimationCompleted event on your ListViewItem because it has no way of knowing what your ListViewItem's type is, and thus it cannot subscribe OnColorAnimationCompleted to the Completed event. Edit: Can you do whatever you need to do in the exit actions???


4

You are correct. There is nowhere to hang the animation inside the control template. While the HyperlinkButton has a foreground property, which is inherited by its content, the property is not exposed as part of the template. Your best bet is to create a usercontrol that plays 2 storyboards via MouseEnter/MouseLeave behaviours ("GlowingHyperlinkButton" ...


4

The problem is that the Background property is not set to an instance of SolidColorBrush. Adding the following to the Border should do the trick: <Border.Background> <SolidColorBrush /> </Border.Background>


4

for documentation purposes it is a little hard to use (Panel.Background).(SolidColorBrush.Color), the real problem is ColorAnimation only work for Color property instead of Brush. for me this is do the trick: define your panel brush <StackPanel Name="SensorPanel" MouseDown="SensorPanel_MouseDown"> <StackPanel.Background> ...


4

I would recommend using VisualStates to do what you are looking for. I modified the Style of a button to add a story to the MouseOver VisualState, then added event listeners for MouseEnter and MouseLeave to the button. These events are fired when you touch the device, and drag your finger over an element, and then drag it off again. You could modify the code ...


3

You're setting the Foreground property of both buttons to the same SolidColorBrush instance (as given by the resource NavigationButtonForegroundBrush). Then in your ColorAnimation you change the Color property of that SolidColorBrush by the expression (Control.Foreground).(SolidColorBrush.Color). Obviously now both buttons have their Foreground changed. You ...


3

While working on another issue I found something that helped me solve this problem. The solution in Method 1 is very close, it was just a matter of solving the problem of the seemingly random other rows also being highlighted at seemingly random times. The problem was container recycling (more information in this question: WPF Toolkit DataGrid Checkbox ...


3

Just done a quick test with string color binding to your animation and it works fine. If your ever binding you sholud make sure you object implements INotifyPropertyChanged as this notifies the xaml that a property has changed. My Test: public partial class MainWindow : Window, INotifyPropertyChanged { private string startTextColor = "Green"; ...


3

Update Yeh if you cannot afford to remove the Storyboard in Trigger.ExitActions then you do indeed have to address the From issue for intermediate starting Storyboard's yourself. However specifying a hard-coded From isn't the only solution. You can let the animation reset itself to the underlying base color when it's starting up. The benefit of this is by ...


3

Use a ColorAnimation instead of DoubleAnimation: <ColorAnimation Duration="0:0:0.3" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Background.(SolidColorBrush.Color)" To="Orange" />


2

You need to set the Duration on the ColorAnimation objects. The default Duration for Animations is 1 second, so your 0.5 second storyboard is only running half of the animation. <Storyboard> <ColorAnimation Storyboard.TargetName="GradientStop1" Storyboard.TargetProperty="Color" To="#83ec71" Duration="0:0:0.5"/> <ColorAnimation ...


2

It seems to be an odity with ColorAnimation, as it works fine with DoubleAnimation. You need to explicity specify the storyboards "TargetName" property to work with ColorAnimation <Window.Resources> <DataTemplate x:Key="NotificationTemplate"> <DataTemplate.Triggers> <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding ...


2

What I would do is create two DataTemplates and use a DataTemplateSelector. Your XAML would be something like: <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding ElementName=Window, Path=Messages}"> <ItemsControl.Resources> <DataTemplate x:Key="CriticalTemplate"> <Border CornerRadius="5" Background="#DDD"> <Border.Triggers> ...


2

Give your TextBlock any Background and it will work. <TextBlock Name="txtBarcode" Background="Transparent" Probably Background is Null and so there is no DependencyObject to animate.


2

I'm lazy right now but is pretty sure you just have to change mouseover, mouseout to mouseenter, mouseleave: http://jsfiddle.net/2UKRG/3/ $(document) .on("mouseenter", "div.object-list-item", function(){ $(this).animate({ borderColor : "#555" },300); }) .on("mouseleave", ...


2

So, I finally worked it out myself. After getting an error message (see "Edit" of original post) I tried crafting a suitable converter and now I could kick myself, for not having seen the obvious! It had nothing to do with WinRT or TemplateBinding or incompatibilities between Windows.UI.Xaml <-> and System-Windows objects. I just did not realize that ...


2

The parentheses are needed when you are referencing either multiple objects and subproperties, or an attached property name Please see Storyboard.TargetProperty for more information.



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