Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

That should get you started: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np # generate random data x = np.random.randint(0,200,(10,10)) plt.pcolormesh(x) # create the colorbar # the aspect of the colorbar is set to 'equal', we have to set it to 'auto', # otherwise twinx() will do weird stuff. cbar = plt.colorbar() pos = cbar.ax.get_position() ...


5

You can simplify Joe Kington's code using the axparameter of figure.colorbar() with a list of axes. From the documentation: ax None | parent axes object(s) from which space for a new colorbar axes will be stolen. If a list of axes is given they will all be resized to make room for the colorbar axes. import numpy as np import ...


4

You could use colorbar's format parameter: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np import matplotlib.ticker as ticker img = np.random.randn(300,300) myplot = plt.imshow(img) def fmt(x, pos): a, b = '{:.2e}'.format(x).split('e') b = int(b) return r'${} \times 10^{{{}}}$'.format(a, b) plt.colorbar(myplot, ...


4

colorbar by default uses a colormap of 64 colors. That causes Matlab, by default, to place 6 yticks in the colorbar, namely at 10, 20, ... 60. When you set the 'Yticklabel' property, if you pass less strings than the number of yticks, those strings are cycled over. That's the behavior you observe. The solution is to reduce the number of yticks to 4, so ...


3

It seems that you will have to arrange your code differently to make it work. The general layout of animation code consits of two parts: 1. Creating of the static content of the plot In this step you create the figure, add the subplots, draw all static content (for example the basemap) and usually add either the first data set or some compatible dummy ...


3

There's more than one way to do this. In your case, it's easiest to use LinearSegmentedColormap.from_list and specify relative positions of colors as well as the colornames. (If you had evenly-spaced changes, you could skip the tuples and just do from_list('my cmap', ['blue', 'white', 'red']).) You'll then need to specify a manual min and max to the data ...


3

If you have a specific set of colors that you want to use for you colormap, you can build it based on those. For example: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from matplotlib.colors import LinearSegmentedColormap cmap = LinearSegmentedColormap.from_list('name', ['green', 'yellow', 'red']) # Generate some data similar to yours y, x = ...


3

To expend my comment that one can make 3 plots, plot the colorbar() in the 3rd one, the data plots in the 1st and 2nd. This way, if necessary, we are free to do anything we want to the 1st and 2nd plots: def rand_data(l, h): return np.random.uniform(low=l, high=h, size=(100,)) # Generate data. x1, x2, y, z = rand_data(0., 1.), rand_data(100., 175.), \ ...


3

You can use plt.subplots() passing the gridspec_kw parameter to adjust the axes' aspect ratio in a very flexible way, and then select the top axes to include the colorbar. I've worked on your code simplifying it quite a bit. Furthermore, I've changed many things in your code such as: PEP8, removed repeated calls to plt.savefig()and ax methods. The result ...


3

If I understand correctly, you want to plot a full-height legend beside two plots whose layout is defined by par(mfrow=c(2, 1). One way to achieve this is to generate the two plots, then set par(new=FALSE) and plot the raster again with legend.only=TRUE. library(raster) r <- raster(matrix(runif(100), ncol=10)) # Set layout; ensure appropriate space at ...


3

Its a feature, because you are setting the ticklabels yourself (with the wrong labels). Its best always trying to avoid setting the ticklabels manually, unless there is no other way. If you remove this line, the labels will show up correctly: c.set_ticklabels(np.arange(11)) To improve readability you could also consider normalizing the colors so they ...


3

This should get you started: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np # some random data to plot x = np.random.rand(10,10)*80e3 - 40e3 plt.imshow(x, aspect='auto', vmin=-40e3, vmax=40e3) # create the colorbar cb = plt.colorbar(orientation='horizontal', ticks=[-40e3,0,40e3]) # get the xtick labels tl = cb.ax.get_xticklabels() # set the ...


3

You can use ylabel to assign a label to the colorbar. Moreover, in order to print superscripts use ^{Text here}. If you want subscripts, use _{Text here}. Simple example: clear clc close all contourf(peaks) hC = colorbar('eastoutside'); LabelText = 'Label with ^{superscript}'; %// Use superscript ylabel(hC,LabelText,'FontSize',16) Resulting in this: ...


2

Updated - here is another option without using GridSpec. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt N = 50 x_vals = np.random.rand(N) y_vals = np.random.rand(N) z1_vals = np.random.rand(N) z2_vals = np.random.rand(N) minimum_z = min(np.min(z1_vals), np.min(z2_vals)) maximum_z = max(np.max(z1_vals), np.max(z2_vals)) fig, axis_array = ...


2

Sure, it's possible! What's happening is that a new axes is being created for the colorbar, and the space is being taken from the axes that pcolormesh is plotted in. If you don't want this to happen, you can specify an axes object for the colorbar to go in. Alternately, you could just use a horizontal colorbar. At any rate, let's reproduce your problem ...


2

How about using cbrange and set format cb instead, i.e.: set cbrange [0:8e4] set format cb "%.0s%c" instead of set cbtics ('80k' 80000, '70k' 70000, '60k' 60000, '50k' 50000, '40k' 40000, '30k' 30000, '20k' 20000, '10k' 10000, '0' 0); in your example. I think this is also a more elegant solution (Edited, k changed to %c based on Christoph's ...


2

Actually, the solution is so easy it is a bit embarrassing to write it here... Sorry bothering the community! Here we go - this solved my problem: levels = [-40,-30,-20,-15,-12,-10,-9,-8,-7,-6,-5,-4,-3,-2,-1,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36] # define the colormap cmap = ...


2

Probably the 'easiest' way to do this is to lay the axes to be used for the color bars out by hand (via cbax = fig.add_axes([....])). You can then pass that axes to the color bar calls: Something like: from matplotlib import pyplot as plt import numpy as np fig = plt.figure(figsize=(8, 8)) ax = fig.add_axes([.1, .1, .8, .8]) im = ...


2

the correct way of calling is: set_zlim(min_value, max_value), if there are problems try also set_zlim3d according to the documentation, colorbar object has a method set_label, see an example here


2

If you have write access to the source, then you can change the line in scatter_contour to return the contour set you need: CS = ax.contourf(H.T, levels, extent=extent, **contour_args) ... return CS and then you can make your colorbar by calling CS = scatter_contour(...) colorbar(CS) If you can't, then you'd have to try trace the references of the ...


1

This is not something specific to colorbar. If you specify the tick labels as a list of strings, they are always (also on X or Y axes) allocated to the first ticks. See this trivial example: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111) ax.plot([0,1],[1,0]) ax.set_xticklabels(["one", "two", "three"]) This draws: Now the ...


1

This will allow you to set the position of the colorbar label anywhere you want using coordinates: import numpy import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1 import make_axes_locatable #Init data data = numpy.random.random((10, 10)) #Create plotting frame fig = plt.figure() ax1 = fig.add_subplot(1, 1, 1) #Plot data im = ax1.imshow(data) ...


1

You can get the colormap rgb values for the colormap jet by typing: cm = jet(number_of_colors). Now you just need to find the correct indice in the colormap-matrix for every value... clear all number_of_colors = 100; cm = jet(number_of_colors); % choose colorbar (jet) values = rand(1,500)*50 + 20; % your data values_min = min(values); % range of the ...


1

In package fields, the two.colors function: library(fields) two.colors(n=256, start='red', end='blue', middle='black')


1

If your data goes from min(data) to max(data) and you didnt manually set up the colorbar limits, then a position in the colorbar is calculated by: colorbarpos= (p-min(data))/(max(data)-min(data)) therefore p=colorbarpos*(max(data)-min(data))+min(data) as Suggested by @Divakar you may want this: [r,c] = ind2sub(size(data),find(data>=0.7 & ...


1

You can get the first actual tick and compare the label to values/locations of the ticks you specified. Then, you can use that index to start your custom labels. Here's a modified example: import matplotlib import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np from matplotlib import cm from numpy.random import random # Make plot with horizontal colorbar ...


1

You're passing in specific rgb values, so matplotlib can't construct a colormap, because it doesn't know how it relates to your original data. Instead of mapping the values to RGB colors, let scatter handle that for you. Instead of: # Mapping the values to RGBA colors data = plt.cm.jet(data[x_data, y_data]) pts = plt.scatter(x_data, y_data, marker='s', ...


1

I don't understand why you want to do this, but you can try this: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np # fig= plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111) arr= np.array([[1,2,3,4],[5,6,7,8],[9,10,11,12]]) im = ax.imshow(arr,interpolation='Nearest',origin='lower') fig.canvas.draw() # draw the axis so we can get the right position pos = ...


1

Got the answer! plotCube.Add(box); var colormap = new ILColormap(Colormaps.Jet); Vector4 key1 = colormap.Map((float)BlockBody.Rho, new Tuple<float, float>(-1, 1)); var test = key1.ToColor(); box.Color = test;


1

I could be very wrong, but you may be able to enforce the right one by passing im into colorbar() as the mappable. In plot2d: cb = colorbar(im, ax=ax, orientation='vertical') I think that way it specifies not only the axes but the mappable input. FYI, it makes no difference to me (using 1.3.1) so nothing breaks, but it also means I can't test it.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible