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5

It's a windows specific problem: try "python back.py examplearg" and it will work. Solution (besides not running Windows!) is to update your registry. http://eli.thegreenplace.net/2010/12/14/problem-passing-arguments-to-python-scripts-on-windows/ Set these keys = value HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Applications\python26.exe\shell\open\command = ...


5

I would use args4j. Any attempt to "properly" parse command line arguments manually is an exercise in futility and wheel-reinvention.


4

When the array is empty, args.length is 0, so your loop will never run in the first place.


3

No, you can't use bars, but you can do "something one" "something two" "something three" if you want to include spaces in your arguments.


3

Try using INFILE="${@: -1}" to get the last argument.


3

Your loop index should start from 0, not 1. When you start in 1, you skip the first argument. At least your condition - x < args.length - is correct. That's why you don't get any exception when you pass no arguments (since the loop is not entered).


3

I'd use: printf "%s\n" "-n" It's simple, safe, reliable, and available most places these days.


2

Please check the User Guide at http://scons.org/doc/production/HTML/scons-user.html . You'll be interested in chapter 10 "Controlling a Build From the Command Line", which describes ways how to propagate values from the command-line to your SConscripts. Reserve an Environment Variable, e.g. "UNITTST_ARGS", and use it to transport your arguments through to ...


2

You will need to put a for loop around the switch statement to parse each element of the list separately. If the list is an Iterable then it should look something like this: for (letterEnum : listOfLetterEnums) { switch(letterEnum) { ... } } For this to work, your list will need to implement the Iterator interface or extend a class which ...


2

Let's separate out the ++ for clarity: argv = argv + 1; Then we have: (*argv)[0] == '-' (I'm presuming this appears in an if statement). Bear in mind that the definition of p[0] is *(p+0), i.e. *p . So this is the same as argv[0][0] == '-' . argv[0] is a char * which points to the first character of a string. So argv[0][0] is the first character of ...


2

There doesn't seem to be built-in support for this, so I ended up going with: System.getProperty("props").split(";") Then from the command-line: java -Dprops="fizz;buzz;etc" -jar myapp.jar


2

As you said, there is no built in support but you can try this: ArrayList props = System.getProperty("props").replaceAll("\\[","").replaceAll("]","").split(",") and call it with: java -Dprops="['fizz','buzz']" -jar myapp.jar


2

%* contains all arguments. you could for %%a in (%*) do echo %%a or use shift, which advances %1 to the next argument and so on. :loop echo %1 shift if "%1" neq "" goto :loop


2

You can just read through sys.argv (an array of the command line arguments) and interpret them any way you like.


2

You are not getting exception even you are not passing command line arguments, why because JVM will create an empty array with no elements even there are no command line arguments. In your for loop you have given condition such that the loop will execute only if the args array size is greater that 1. So first time your args size is zero so for loop won't ...


1

This line: VAR = "C_program '$@'" doesn't do what you want. And your mv line is broken too. VAR=$(C_program "$@") mv "$1" "$VAR" Also, your C program doesn't exit with an error when an error is detected. Also, sed and tr are existing programs that are suitable alternatives to writing your C program to transliterate (translate) characters in strings. ...


1

There is nothing wrong with starting a loop index at a non negative value, when the condition is valid (eg: i < args.length). This is because the loop condition is evaluated first. On the other hand, if we have int x = -1, you would have, x < args.length -> -1 < 0 => the instruction System.out.println(args[x] + " "); will be called and do ...


1

Since mpz_class has a constructor that takes a null-terminated string, the following should work: mpz_class theFile(argv[1]);


1

Remove the "nargs" keyword argument. Once that argument is defined the argparse assumes your argument will be a list (nargs=1 meaning a list with 1 element)


1

Docopt for parsing command line argument should be mentionned at this point. Docopt transform a commandline in dictionnary.


1

--skip-secure-auth allows the use of the old, pre-4.1 password hashing method. This obsolete authentication mechanism is handled by a plugin known as mysql_old_password. According to the Connector/J manual, it is not disabled by default (read about the disabledAuthenticationPlugins option), so I suppose the default behaviour is to allow such connections ...


1

You're seeing a well known limitation in shell. :-) You could get the last argument by stepping through the existing arguments: #!/bin/bash while [ ! -z "$2" ]; do shift done echo "Last argument: $1" In Bourne (non-Bash) shell, you could do this with eval, which is evil: #!/bin/bash eval "echo \"Last argument: \$$#\"" If you don't need ...


1

You're trying to do indirect referencing of an array, so ${!#} would also work.


1

Leave out the first call to shift. Usually, you use that to remove the arguments that you've already parsed, but since you want to parse them twice, you don't want to remove any after the first pass. By the way, $[OPTIND-1] is obsolete; use $((OPTIND-1)) instead.


1

Here's one way to do it: # If option xxx is not the default, yyy and zzz should not be present. if args.xxx != 'ABC' and (args.yyy or args.zzz): # Print help, exit. # Options yyy and zzz should both be either present or None. if (args.yyy is None) != (args.zzz is None): # Print help, exit. # Earn our pay. if args.yyy is None: command2() else: ...


1

Posix provides guidelines for the syntax of utilities, as Chapter 12 of XBD (the Base Definitions). It's certainly worth a read. As is noted, backwards-compatibility has meant that many standardized utilities do not conform to these guidelines, but nonetheless the standard recommends ... that all future utilities and applications use these guidelines to ...


1

Consider using a library for evaluating your command line arguments, like JOptSimple. They provide a nice set of examples on their website and you wouldn't have to re-invent the wheel. Adopting to your example, the following should work, according to the documentation (haven't tried it out): OptionParser parser = new OptionParser("app:env:"); OptionSet ...


1

I don't think recursion is needed. You can do something like this: public static void main (String[] args) { List<String> apps = new LinkedList<>(); List<String> envs = new LinkedList<>(); List<String> current = null; // parse arguments for (String arg : args) { if (arg.equals("-app")) current = ...


1

Even though this might not directly answer your question, I strongly suggest that you use a library for that. Some widely used options: Commons CLI - http://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-cli/ JCommander - http://jcommander.org/ JOpt-Simple - http://pholser.github.io/jopt-simple/ ArgParse4J - http://argparse4j.sourceforge.net/ After all, "life is too ...


1

# 2. Make sure $1 is "-u" or "--user". if ! [ "$1" = -u -o "$1" = --user ]; then # Test failed. Send a message perhaps. exit 1 fi # 3. Make sure $3 is "-f" or "--fizz". if ! [ "$3" = -f -o "$3" = --fizz ]; then # Test failed. Send a message perhaps. exit 1 fi Other forms for testing a variable for two possible possible values: [ ! ...



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