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5

Your output is likely to be an address of "ordinary" argv parameter, that is implicitely converted interpretedsee comment below as char. In other words I suspect that what you have is equivalent to: int main(int agrc, char **argv) { printf("%d", (char) argv); return 0; } On my machine (CentOS 6 32-bit) disassembled object codes are as follows: ...


5

If you can use boost library you could simple do it like this: string date("2015-11-12"); string format("%Y-%m-%d"); date parsedDate = parser.parse_date(date, format, svp); You can read more about this here. If you want a pure C++ solution you can try using struct tm tm; std::string s("2015-11-123"); if (strptime(s.c_str(), "%Y-%m-%d", &tm)) ...


4

There is no equivalent to %* or $* in VBScript. The WScript.Arguments collection hides the input command line, giving access to the arguments as items inside collections. The only way I know to retrieve the required information is to query WMI for the current process and from the process information read the command line. This will give you the full ...


4

Use parameter expansion: var=${1:-default} From the given link: ${parameter:-word} If parameter is unset or null, the expansion of word is substituted. Otherwise, the value of parameter is substituted. See an example: $ echo "$v" $ t=${v:-hello} $ echo "$t" hello $ v=2 $ t=${v:-hello} $ echo "$t" 2 And note also that ${var:-value} and ...


4

I think, your getopt() call should look like while((option =getopt(argc,argv,"n:")) !=-1){ //notice the : as you'll be supplying an argument (value) for that option. That said, in your code, inside divisor() function, char f=*temp1; int n=f-'0'; looks wrong. temp is a char pointer an dereferencing the pointer only gives you the value of the first ...


4

The documentation for readProcess says: readProcess :: FilePath Filename of the executable (see RawCommand for details) -> [String] any arguments -> String standard input -> IO String stdout When it's asking for standard input it's not asking for a file to read the input from, but the actual contents of standard input for the ...


3

You have to terminate the longopts array with an entry that is all zeros, otherwise getopt_long doesn't know when it ends. Your code is crashing because getopt_long is just iterating through random memory at that point because it has fallen off the end of longopts. struct option longopts[] = { {"version", no_argument, 0, 'v'}, {0, 0, 0, 0} };


3

To get the program's arguments, you need to define your main function with an argument count (conventionally named argc) and and argument array (conventionally named argv), so something as int main(int argc, char**argv) { for (int ix=1; ix<argc; ix++) { FILE* fil = fopen(argv[ix], "r"); if (!fil) { perror(argv[ix]); exit(EXIT_FAILURE); }; ...


3

I have not been able to find a way of passing a list directly into the Docopt argument dictionary. However, I have worked out a solution that has allowed me to pass a string into Docopt, then convert that string into a list. There are issues with your Docopt doc and I revised them so that I could test the solution specific to your case. This code was ...


3

To fix this problem, you can put quotes (") around your if parameters. Like so: if "%1" == "/?" goto Help This works and it fixes your problem. A working example? Here you go: @echo off if "%1" == "/?" goto help :main echo No help here. echo Just doing stuff exit /b 1 :help echo The file is helping you... timeout 1 >nul echo Just kidding. exit /b 0


3


2

for /f "usebackq tokens=* delims=" %%# in ("C:\path\to\document.txt") do ( call "C:/path/to/script.js" %%# ) ?


2

Use a here-document: myprogramm <<'EOF' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oT3mCybbhf0 EOF If you wrap the starting EOF in single quotes, bash won't interpret any special chars in the here-doc.


2

Single dash long arguments aren't a problem: In [250]: p=argparse.ArgumentParser() In [251]: p.add_argument('-longargument') Out[251]: _StoreAction(option_strings=['-longargument'], dest='longargument', nargs=None, const=None, default=None, type=None, choices=None, help=None, metavar=None) In [252]: p.parse_args(['-long','test']) Out[252]: ...


2

You want a mutually exclusive group of arguments. Here's a minimal example: import argparse parser = argparse.ArgumentParser() group = parser.add_mutually_exclusive_group() group.add_argument('-a', help='Do A', action='store_true') group.add_argument('-b', help='Do B', action='store_true') args = parser.parse_args() if args.a: print('A!') if args.b: ...


1

Try: echo "${1:-"my default"}" in your script (e. g. foo.sh) to see the effect of the :- modifier. Notice that in case you pass an empty string to your script, also the default kicks in: $ ./foo.sh "" my default So you cannot distinguish the empty string from a not-given argument this way. In case you need to have that distinction, you should rely on ...


1

add (shell =True) in argument but use with caution warning for using shell = True argument


1

Thanks to @CharlesDuffy for the idea. Just go through sys.argv beforehand and replace each -long-option with --long-option, but remember to intercept the parser's help message too. Something like this: parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(add_help=False) parser.add_argument(('-h', '--help'), help='Show this message and quit', action='count') # add other args ...


1

As I understand and as devdigital had suggested, you can use the Command Line Parser Library (available using NuGet). I use it in my project in order to start the application in different states. First you will define all your accepted parameters (with possibility to set some of them as optional, more info on library docs) public class CommandLineArgs { ...


1

I think, in your code for (j = 0; j != '\0'; ++j) is problematic. You should be checking the array element against null. It should rather read for (j = 0; argv[i][j] != '\0'; ++j) That said, putchar() takes an int as argument, so you don't need to cast the return value of toupper().


1

I believe you will find that the ~ isn't been interrupted correctly (it's been consider as a literal and not expanded by the exec function) For example, if I use something like... ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder("ls", "~"); pb.redirectErrorStream(true); try { Process p = pb.start(); InputStream is = null; try { ...


1

Have you tried using action="store_true" in add_argument. This makes the argument take no follow up value and if it is present then it stores true for what ever variable you specify in dest variable of add_argument. See argparse store options.


1

Well, the JVM arguments are typed before using '-D', then after the jar file you'll type your program arguments: java -Djvm_argument1=XXX -Djvm_argument2=YYY -jar myjar.jar my_argument1 my_argument2


1

If you want to redirect the normal standard input of the program, you could use so called "here documents" (see e.g. the BASH manual page): java -jar script.jar <<EOF your input here EOF That means standard input (a.k.a. stdin) is redirected and will be the text in the "here document", in this case your input here.


1

From your question I'm not sure if you want a simple solution or an elegant one. Here is a sketch how an elegant solution could look like. You define an Functional Interface, i.e. a Interface that has only one method, that's returned by your Parser. like: // I the Input type // R the result type public interface Fn<I,R> { R apply (I input); } ...


1

Remoting or WCF are good ways to do this. You probably should choose some of the "IPC" transports because they are restricted to local machine communication. That's a nice security guarantee. Note, that Remoting is considered obsolete. The .NET Framework source code has the Remoting feature behind an #if FEATURE_REMOTING so they can delete that feature ...


1

You have: class CCustomCommandLineInfo : public CCommandLineInfo { CCustomCommandLineInfo() { //m_bExport = m_bOpen = m_bWhatever = FALSE; m_bNoGUI = m_baMode = FALSE; } That makes the default constructor a private function. That's why you can't use: CCustomCommandLineInfo oInfo; Make the default constructor public. class ...


1

For a fast solution you can just set backspace character to a metavar. p.add_argument('-i', '--ini', help="use alternate ini file", metavar='\b') It will get you this: optional arguments: -h, --help show this help message and exit If you want this: -i, --ini INI use alternate ini file You will have to modify help formatter. ...


1

You're already doing it -- that's what desc is, which stands for description.



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