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Others have indicated how to change the editor, but here are a couple more tips. Firstly, a blank commit message aborts the commit. This is handy if you realise you have forgotten something while typing your message. Secondly, there is a sort of informal standard for the creation of commit messages which it is a good idea to adhere to. By following the ...


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A git revert should have introduced a new commit. You can reset your branch to the previous commit and see if you get back your files. You can try, on a clone of your current repo: git clone repo1 repo2 cd repo2 git reset --hard HEAD~ (if that doesn't work, the fact that the reset has been done on a clone means you have erased anything on your current ...


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You can't "remove" the first commit, but you can just squash the two commits you've made into a single commit. You can accomplish this with a git rebase -i HEAD~2, but I personally find this process easier: Move you branch pointer back to the first commit: git reset --hard HEAD~ Stage the changes from the previous commit: git merge --squash HEAD@{1} ...


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You could do an interactive rebase, squashing the two commits: git rebase -i HEAD~2 Follow the instructions in the editor where you can also change the commit message. The original commits still exist (but aren't reachable), you can remove them by garbage collection: git gc


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For question 1: You can try this: $ git config --global core.editor vi since vi is pre-installed on fresh Ubuntu 12.04. From official manual of git config: core.editor Commands such as commit and tag that lets you edit messages by launching an editor uses the value of this variable when it is set, and the environment variable GIT_EDITOR is ...


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For a query like this: BEGIN TRANSACTION SAVE TRAN t1 DELETE FROM udata; COMMIT; ROLLBACK TRANSACTION t1 You will get an error: The ROLLBACK TRANSACTION request has no corresponding BEGIN TRANSACTION.. Sure, no rollback after a commit. But if you try to wrap it in another transaction: BEGIN TRANSACTION BEGIN TRANSACTION SAVE TRAN t1 DELETE ...


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You have to change your default editor. This can be done from the command line using the following command: export EDITOR=vim replacing vim with whatever the name of the editor you'd like to use is. EDIT: I should also note that its common to use git commit -m "commit message here" instead of git commit, since commit messages generally aren't very long ...


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Put export EDITOR=vi in your .profile file to set your default editor. Commit messages should, generally, be short, so usually it's better to replace all that stuff with a short description. It's really there just so you can see what you're committing.


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1) yes, install vi(m) and use sudo update-alternatives –config editor 2) do as you like, lines starting with an # will be ignored



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