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This is a community wiki answer, do not hesitate to contribute. This answer is here if someone is looking for an implementation of what OP wants. What follows uses no destructive operation (NCONC, MAPCAN) since an implementation might return an internal list without copying it. MAPPEND is imported from alexandria, and MOP operations can be imported from ...


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You didn't say which implementation you were using. You would need to find out, where the time is spend. But for me it looks like the implementation of MAP of a list and a vector of equal length to a new vector in your Common Lisp might be very inefficient. Even when consing a new vector, which has some overhead, the implementation can be much faster. Try ...


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Welcome to the intricacies of Common Lisp optimization! The first thing to note is about the different program optimization strategies performed by the different implementations: I tried your examples in SBCL, and both of them performed very efficiently with almost the same time, while in CCL the vector version was executed much much slower than the list ...


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What about of appending % to the stream like this: (with-open-file (str "filename.txt" :direction :output :if-exists :supersede :if-does-not-exist :create) (format str "~A~%" '(1 2 3 4 5))) In your case I will do something like go througth the list and write to the stream, some thing like ...


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There are multiple ways of implementing a symbol table, with varying levels of "suitable for purpose" depending on your exact needs. At the end of the day, a symbol table is, effectively, just a mapping from "symbol name" to something. So any data structure that allows you to add things to it as well as looking things up should work. Fairly common ...


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Everyone already answered while I was trying to optimize the code, so I'll just put this version here without bothering to explain too much. It should run pretty fast, at least on SBCL. (declaim (optimize (speed 3) (safety 0) (debug 0))) (declaim (type (simple-array (simple-array fixnum 1) 1) *barning-matrixes*)) (defparameter *barning-matrixes* (map '(...


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Inspecting vector #(1 2 3) on SBCL gives: Dimensions: (3) Element type: T Total size: 3 Adjustable: NIL Fill pointer: NIL Contents: 0: 1 1: 2 2: 3 You can see that there are a little more data to store than in a list, even though the exact internal representation of vectors varies among implementations. For small vectors that keep being copied like in ...


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The way you have implemented the loop, only one book will ever be added to *lib*. This is because you are explicitly terminating the loop when count exceeds 1, i.e. after the first book entry has been read from the input file: (cond((> count 1) (return "Library filled"))) Instead of checking a counter, I guess I would add a small function whose sole ...


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Thanks for the keen eyes. This example is from a 31 years old printed Lisp textbook straight out of the chapter "dynamic versus lexical scoping". The explanation comes also straight out of that book. I guess that the lexical scoping was not checked, because the authors explicitly warn the readers that lexical scoping was not done in Lisp. I am happy that ...


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On my system the return-a-base-string is not needed, but I think it could be good to add for compatibility. I use the (ecl) embedded CLISP 16.1.2 version. The following piece of code reads a string from lisp and converts to C++ strings types - std::string and c-string- and store them on C++ variables: // strings initializations: string and c-string std::...


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Yup, your approach looks right, here is a small test to show the concept that can be run straight from the repl. (let* (;; a float (v0 32s0) ;; a pointer to a float foreign memory (p0 (cffi:foreign-alloc :float :initial-element v0))) ;; a new pointer (cffi:with-foreign-object (p1 :pointer) ;; make the new pointer point to ...



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