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171

Setting module.exports allows the database_module function to be called like a function when required. Simply setting exports wouldn't allow the function to be exported. The following code wouldn't allow the user to call the function. The following won't work. module.js exports = nano = function database_module(cfg) {return;} Console var func = ...


168

RequireJS implements the AMD API (source). CommonJS is a way of defining modules with the help of an exports object, that defines the module contents. Simply put a CommonJS implementation might work like this // someModule.js exports.doSomething = function() { return "foo"; }; //otherModule.js var someModule = require('someModule'); // in the vein of node ...


76

module is just a plain JavaScript object with an exports property. exports is a plain JavaScript variable that happens to be set to module.exports. At the end of your file, node.js will basically 'return' module.exports to the require function. A simplified way to view a JS file in Node could be this: var module = { exports: {} }; var exports = ...


73

Basically the answer lies in what really happens when a module is required via 'require' statement.Assuming this is the first time the module is being required. For example , var x = require('file1.js'); contents of file1.js; module.exports = '123' When the above statement is executed, a 'Module' object is created. Module constructor function , ...


72

CommonJS is more than that - it's a project to define a common API and ecosystem for JavaScript. One part of CommonJS is the Module specification. Node.js and RingoJS are server-side JavaScript runtimes, and yes, both of them implement modules based on the CommonJS Module spec. AMD (Asynchronous Module Definition) is another specification for modules. ...


70

CommonJS is definitely suitable for the browser, with some caveats. The CommonJS module pattern is quite nice (in my biased opinion), and is also a good stepping stone to the module system proposed for ECMAScript Harmony (the planned next release of the JavaScript language). Specifically, Harmony modules won't have access to the global ("window") object. ...


67

EventMachine has nothing to do with Rails apart from them both being written in the same language. You can get EventMachine as bare as Node.js; all you have to do is not add libraries to your project. In my experience the EventMachine libraries (like em-http) are much nicer than anything for Node. And you can use fibers instead of callbacks to avoid callback ...


63

As an addition to jrburke's answer, note that you don't have to return the constructor function directly. For most useful classes you'll also want to add methods via the prototype, which you can do like this: define('Employee', function() { // Start with the constructor function Employee(firstName, lastName) { this.firstName = firstName; ...


57

The AMD proposal allows you to just return a value for the exported object. But note that is a feature of the AMD proposal, it is just an API proposal, and will make it harder to translate the module back to a regular CommonJS module. I think that is OK, but useful info to know. So you can do the following: I prefer modules that export a constructor ...


46

The short answer would be: CommonJS and AMD are specifications (or formats) on how modules and their dependencies should be declared in javascript applications. RequireJS is a script loader library that is AMD compliant, curljs being another example. CommonJS compliant: Taken from Addy Osmani's book. // package/lib is a dependency we require var lib = ...


42

This is indeed a restriction in the AMD format. You could use exports, and that problem goes away. I find exports to be ugly, but it is how regular CommonJS modules solve the problem: define("Employee", ["exports", "Company"], function(Company) { function Employee(name) { this.name = name; this.company = new Company.Company(name + "'s ...


37

Here's what I think is the 'rightest' answer for this situation. Say you have a script file called quadtree.js. You should build a custom node_module that has this sort of directory structure... ./node_modules/quadtree/quadtree-lib/ ./node_modules/quadtree/quadtree-lib/quadtree.js ./node_modules/quadtree/quadtree-lib/README ...


34

This is how the Underscore.js library does it (by looking for CommonJS support): Edit: to your updated question: (function () { // Establish the root object, `window` in the browser, or `global` on the server. var root = this; // Create a refeence to this var _ = new Object(); var isNode = false; // Export the Underscore object ...


32

CommonJS modules allow two ways to define exported properties. In either case you are returning an Object/Function. Because functions are first class citizens in JavaScript they to can act just like Objects (technically they are Objects). That said your question about using the new keywords has a simple answer: Yes. I'll illustrate... Module exports You ...


26

In my opinion, some of the node.js examples are quite contrived. You might expect to see something more like this in the real world // square.js function Square(width) { if (!(this instanceof Square)) { return new Square(width); } this.width = width; }; Square.prototype.area = function area() { return Math.pow(this.width, 2); }; ...


26

Yes, and I owe this answer to ded and his awesome modules: (function(name, definition) { if (typeof module != 'undefined') module.exports = definition(); else if (typeof define == 'function' && typeof define.amd == 'object') define(definition); else this[name] = definition(); }('mod', function() { //This is the code you would ...


23

Well there's no reliable way to detect running in Node.js since every website could easily declare the same variables, yet, since there's no window object in Node.js by default you can go the other way around and check whether you're running inside a Browser. This is what I use for libs that should work both in a Browser and under Node.js: if (typeof ...


22

I have used requirejs extensively in the past (implementation on BBC iPlayer in 2010) and it works well. It can handle CommonJS modules, but it needs an additional wrapper, which I find annoying. If you want to use those modules in node.js as well, you need to use requirejs on the server side as well, which I don't like doing since it is not idiomatic ...


18

There is a much better method than using eval: the vm module. For example, here is my execfile module, which evaluates the script at path in either context or the global context: var vm = require("vm"); var fs = require("fs"); module.exports = function(path, context) { var data = fs.readFileSync(path); vm.runInNewContext(data, context, path); } Also ...


18

TL;DR; In your case, it should be as simple as using; $ = require('jquery/dist/jquery')(window); // v2.1.0-beta2 It might be obvious; but you'll have to use this form of declaration (pass window to the result of require) in every module you use, not just one/ the first, etc. Non-TL;DR; For anyone wanting to know why, the interesting code in jQuery ...


17

Here is a list of various cross-compatible module formats. I suspect that the one you're looking for is what they're calling "commonjsStrict.js"


16

When you npm install foo, the foo module gets installed in a directory named node_modules in the current working directory. When you install this shift library, it only looks for modules to require within its own node_modules directory, or in one of the global directories require.resolve() searches. And that's the simple solution to your problem: npm ...


16

I tend towards the "use what you know" (even if it's a heavier architecture). Because of that, I don't see it being quite as simple as "EventMachine vs NodeJS." Mainly, the difference can be summarized as this: NodeJS is a framework/language that was written to handle event based programming in JavaScript. That is its driving force. It's not an after ...


16

require() is really best for just javascript code and json files to maintain parity with node and to improve readability of your code to outsiders who expect require() to work the way it does in node. Instead of using require() to load text files, consider using the brfs transform. With brfs, you maintain parity with node by calling fs.readFileSync() but ...


16

Even question is answered and accepted long ago, just want to share my 2 cents: You can imagine that at very begining of your file there is something like (just for explanation): var module = new Module(...); var exports = module.exports; So whatever you do just keep in mind that module.exports and NOT exports will be returned from your module when you ...


15

CommonJS is only a standard that specifies a way to modularize JavaScript, so CommonJS itself does not provide any JavaScript libraries. CommonJS specifies a require() function which lets one import the modules and then use them, the modules have a special global variable named exports which is an object which holds the things that will get exported. // ...


15

While it is true that both will ultimately accomplish the same thing, the difference is that your second example is not asynchronous. For example, consider what happens if JSON.parse(...) turns out to be an extremely expensive operation; you'll have to hang until everything's finished, which may not always be what you want. That's what promises get you: the ...


15

Update: Now that promises have been formally standardized, I'd suggest using the es6-promise polyfill if your targeted browser doesn't already have the native Promise object. However, forEachAsync, forAllAsync, and lateral from the FuturesJS collection provide very useful functionality for handling multiple async tasks / promises at once. I'm the developer ...


15

By default, invoking a function like (function(){/*...*/})() will set the value of this in the function to window (in a browser) irrespective of whatever the value of this may be in the enclosing context where the function was created. Using call allows you to manually set the value of this to whatever you want. In this case, it is setting it to whatever ...


14

I typically go with the second approach, attaching functions to the prototypes. The issue you're having with variables "not being available in closures" has nothing to do with prototypes. You'd have that same issue either way you structure it. It's to do with javascript's oft-confusing dynamic this: ...



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