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48

I don't think there's anything deeper going on than what you have originally said: it's just syntactic sugar whereby the compiler converts f(a) into f.apply(a) as a special syntax case. This might seem like a specific rule, but only a few of these (for example, with update) allows for DSL-like constructs and libraries.


37

The reason why case class companion objects implement FunctionN is that before, case classes generated a class and a factory method, not a companion object. When we added extractors to Scala it made more sense to turn the factory method into a full companion object with apply and unapply methods. But then, since the factory method did conform to FunctionN, ...


35

The companion object basically provides a place where one can put 'static' methods. Further more, a companion object, or companion module, has full access to the class members, including private ones. Companion Objects are great for encapsulating things like factory methods. Instead of having to have Foo and FooFactory everywhere, you can have a class with ...


24

Companion objects are useful for storing state and methods that are common to all instances of a class but they do not use static methods or fields. They use regular virtual methods which can be overridden through inheritance. Scala truly has nothing static. There are lots of ways you can use this but here's a simple example. abstract class AnimalCounter { ...


21

...and it's a good place to store static factory methods (not that DP) for accompanied classes. If you name those overloaded factory methods apply(/.../) you will be able to create/initialize you class without 'new' (not really that important) with different possible sets of parameters (compare to what Bloch writes in Effective Java about telescoping ...


19

Paolo's solution is good (+1), but he didn't explain the error message, so let me try that. The problem stems from the fact that every method needs a return type. Your original definition of apply and dual returned an object of class A, thus the implicit return type of both was A. That implies that A must be visible to clients - how else could they call the ...


17

I think Stack singleton (if it stands alone) or Stack companion (if it comes with a class) is the best way to name object Stack. The Scala Language Reference calls them modules. But modules have by now been too much associated with run-time entities (as in OSGI) to be comfortable with that.


16

I think you don't want a private class, but a class with a private constructor. class A private() object A { def apply = dual lazy val dual = new A } Now your class is "visible" to outside code, but only your companion object can create instances of it.


15

I think using the phrase "companion object" should be clear enough.


15

In addition to the things Saem said in his reply, the Scala compiler also looks for implicit conversions of types in the corresponding companion objects (of either the source or the target), so the conversions don't need to be imported. About the reason for singleton objects in general Programming in Scala says: As mentioned in Chapter 1, one way in ...


14

Let's call the class class SomeClass (though it could also be e.g. a trait). Private members Methods of the companion object (object SomeClass) have access to private methods/data of instances of class SomeClass. If your companion object only uses the public interface of your class (e.g. just defines constants), there's no practical difference. But there ...


13

What is happening is that each "line" on REPL is actually placed in a different package, so the class and the object do not become companions. You can solve this in a few ways: Make chain class and object definitions: scala> class CompanionObjectTest { | private val x = 3; | }; object CompanionObjectTest { | def ...


13

It is actually the other way around, an object or class with an apply method is the normal case and a function is way to construct implicitly an object of the same name with an apply method. Actually every function you define is an subobject of the Functionn trait (n is the number of arguments). Refer to section 6.6:Function Applications on page 77 of the ...


10

Well, given that target.apply(a1, a2, a3 ... aN) in Scala: can be sugared by target(a1, a2, a3 ... aN) is the method which needs to be implemented by FunctionN it seems natural that a companion object: object MyClass { def apply(a1 : A1, ... aN: AN) = new MyClass(a1, ..., aN) } is really: object MyClass extends FunctionN[A1, ... , AN, MyClass]{ ...


8

Aside from oxbow_lakes's reply about the naturalness of it, it can often be useful to have constructors available as first-class functions, particularly in conjunction with Scala collections higher-order functions. For (a trivial) example, scala> case class Foo(i : Int) defined class Foo scala> List(1, 2, 3) map Foo res0: List[Foo] = List(Foo(1), ...


8

With the Scala compiler as it stands now there is no way to define companion objects other than by putting them in the same file. The best you can do is a non-companion object with the same package and name and an extra import. If you can think of a good way to create post-hoc companionship without breaking assumptions about encapsulation please come post ...


8

There are several problems in your code. First, as you already said, the type will be erased, second objects (object FooCompanionObject[f <: Foo]) don't take type parameters and third, objects can not be extended (object Bar extends FooCompanionObject). To do what you want, you have to create an abstract base class for your companion objects, that takes a ...


7

You can define your own companion object of course, which I often do in my own project-specific Predef-like arrangement. For example: object domain { type TimeUnit = java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit object TimeUnit { def valueOf(s : String) = java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit.valueOf(str) val Millis = java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS ...


7

Well young Scala coder, have no fear because the answer is simple. You are not using the factory correctly. See, this code will actually do what you want: val widget = Stuff(1,2) //makes Stuff(1, 2L) The issue here is your syntax. When you call new it instantiates a new class of Stuff. But apply is really syntactic sugar for widget.apply(1,2) and there's ...


7

I'd go for "Stack" == the class Stack "Stack's companion" == companion object of the Stack class "A Stack" == an instance of the class Stack


7

There's a rule that implicit has to be defined earlier in the compilation unit. So, move object Show to the top and it compiles. Alternatively, object Show { //implicit object StringShow extends Show[String] { implicit val x: Show[String] = new Show[String] { def show(s: String) = s"[String: $s]" } } see the explanation about the type: ...


6

There are multiple ways to model the abstraction you need in Scala. I will first describe the most simple pattern and analyze your problem, and then I will describe the most complex pattern, which is used in Scala collections. The first thing to notice is that companion objects are the right place to put code you will need to call without having an instance ...


6

You'd need to code it yourself, for instance (not thread safe): abstract class C { // executed by all subclasses during construction C.registerInstance(this) } object C { private val instances = ListBuffer[C]() def registerInstance(c: C) { instances += c } }


5

It is important to understand that in scala, an object actually is a first class citizen: it is an actual instance that can be passed around as any other object. By example: trait Greetings { def hello() { println("hello") } def bye() { println("bye") } } object FrenchGreetings extends Greetings { override def hello() { println("bonjour") } ...


5

Make it private for anybody but As object WorkSheet1 { object A { def apply(s: String, huh: Boolean = false): A = A(s) } case class A private[A](s: String) val a = A("Oh, Hai", false) } I added false to solve ambiguity between object apply and case class constructor which is publicly visible.


5

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger object Foo { val counter = new AtomicInteger(0) } class Foo { val i = Foo.counter.incrementAndGet() println(i) }


5

Your apply method is a procedure. Amend it to apply(fichier: String): ElémentXML = .... The overload with the synthetic case apply is resolved by the expected type. This why procedure syntax will be deprecated: apm@mara:~/tmp$ scala -Xfuture -deprecation Welcome to Scala version 2.11.0-20140129-135431-0e578e6931 (OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.7.0_25). ...


5

The answer to this false dichotomy is neither. It should be a local method to doAndPrint. class Foo { def doAndPrint { val result = doSomething() def message(result: Result): String = s"message formatted with $result" val msg = message(result) println(msg) } } In fact, class Foo { def doAndPrint { val result = doSomething() ...


5

This issue in Scala is certainly not without irony, but even in the Java space there can be naming issues regarding java.lang.Object, its instances, its class and instances of its class. For Scala I propose the following terminology: Call instantiated objects “instances” Call objects “objects” In the end, I would say that the idea of OO includes objects ...


5

Welcome to Scala version 2.8.0.RC3 (Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM, Java 1.6.0_20). scala> case class CC3(i: Int, b: Boolean, s: String) defined class CC3 scala> CC3 res0: CC3.type = <function3> scala> CC3.apply(1, true, "boo!") res1: CC3 = CC3(1,true,boo!) scala> CC3(1, true, "boo!") res2: CC3 = CC3(1,true,boo!)



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