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11

You are comparing an unsigned int to a signed char. The semantics of this kind of comparison are counter-intuitive: most binary operations involving signed and unsigned operands are performed on unsigned operands, after converting the signed value to unsigned (if both operands have the same size after promotion). Here are the steps: The signed char value ...


7

A comment says that these are "not quite the same thing." But doesn't specify any details. NaNs are mentioned further on, but a test shows that a NaN compares to 0. the expected way. What are the cases where == and != can both return true/false? The standard says: The == (equal to) and != (not equal to) operators are analogous to the relational ...


5

This is fully specified behaviour, not an accidental feature. Operator chaining is defined in the Comparison operators section: Comparisons can be chained arbitrarily, e.g., x < y <= z is equivalent to x < y and y <= z, except that y is evaluated only once (but in both cases z is not evaluated at all when x < y is found to be false). in ...


5

list.reverse() is in-place, meaning it reverses the list it is called upon but doesn't return anything. The line print new should print None, and therefore myList == new will be False. Instead, use [::-1] which is not in-place and returns a new, reversed list, or use an easier way to detect a palindrome, for example: def is_palindrome(iterable): ...


5

"Unlike the bitwise | operator, the || operator guarantees left-to-right evaluation; there is a sequence point after the evaluation of the first operand. If the first operand compares unequal to 0, the second operand is not evaluated." yes it's true ... to make it clear first make sure that you are aware of these basics 1) (1 || any_var) is 1 2) Operator ...


1

Not typically. JS does not allow operator overloading or operators-as-methods. There are certain operators that call toString or valueOf internally, which you can override on your own classes, thus influencing the behavior.


1

x is 1 because the expression: 0==1||k++ turns out to be true (which is 1 in C land). Why you ask? There are two sequence points here: 0 == 1 and k++. Since the first sequence point evaluates to false (0 in C land), the second sequence point is evaluated (because the short circuit operator is ||). The second sequence returns true (or 1). So, you the entire ...


1

The Operator || (OR) evaluates to true in the cases: ex: A || B A is true, B is true, Both are true Because this operation uses Short-Circuit Evaluation if A is evaluated to true, it means that the statement is true already and it won't evaluate B. In your case 0==1 (0 equals 1) is clearly false, so it will evaluate k++. k++ is a tricky one (in my ...


1

This is one possible answer I have been able to make work, but it's so ugly, (reduces every comparison to an int value - might work for strings, but will be bloody hard for other types) - I don't want to accept it: type MyInt int type Valuer interface { ValueOf() int } func LessThan(i, j Valuer) bool { return i.ValueOf() < j.ValueOf() } func ...


1

Edit: consider this user type: type userType struct { frequency int value rune } and suppose you want to add this types to your Linked List: and It should be sorted by frequency first, then if the frequencies are the same, look at the char value. so the Compare function will be: func (a userType) Compare(b userType) int { if a....



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