Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

If all those data are hashable, you can simply construct a set and check its length, like this if len({s1, s2, s3..., s17}) == 17: # All are not equal For example, if all them are just integers, like you mentioned in the comments, >>> s1, s2, s3 = 1, 1, 1 >>> len({s1, s2, s3}) 1 >>> s1, s2, s3 = 1, 2, 3 >>> len({s1, ...


3

Comparing string in a case insensitive way seems like something that's trivial, but it's not. I will be using Python 3, since Python 2 is underdeveloped here. The first thing to note it that case-removing conversions in unicode aren't trivial. There is text for which text.lower() != text.upper().lower(), such as "ß": "ß".lower() #>>> 'ß' ...


2

I can think of two ways to do that comparison: Keep your strings normalized and use operator== (Don't add unneeded trailing null terminators). If for some reason you really need bonus trailing null terminators, use strcmp.


2

If you assign the values manually, like this enum ObjType { A = 1, B = 2, C = 3, ... H = 8 } you would be able to use numeric comparisons. Similarly, if you use enum flags you would be able to use bit masking: [Flags] enum ObjType { A = 1, B = 2, C = 4, ... H = 256 } if (((ObjType.A | ObjType.B | ObjType.C) & ...


2

A fun program! The problem was that raw_input captured the number as text, using int will convert it to a number: from random import randrange print("hi I've a number below 100 can you guess??"); theNumber = randrange(100) theAnswer = int(raw_input("your first guess >")) while theNumber != theAnswer : print (str(theAnswer) + " .. " + str(theNumber) ...


2

Sure: "a" vs "B" sorts differently using CompareOrdinal than with CurrentCulture, InvariantCulture, and InvariantCulture ignoring case. Demonstration: http://rextester.com/QSCF42204 string a = "a"; string b = "B"; Console.WriteLine(Comparer<string>.Default.Compare(a, b)); Console.WriteLine(string.CompareOrdinal(a, b)); ...


1

Let me say first, that image processing is not my best field, nor am I an expert in any way. However, here is my suggestion: take the absolute value of each pixel in the pictures, in row-major order, respective to each other. Then, average out the differences, and see if the average is within a certain threshold: if so, the images are similar in nature. ...


1

No, because three dots ... here (0...(order.length - 1)) mean 'without last element', so last value would be order.length - 2. You'll encounter the same error if you try (0..(order.length - 1)). Check Range documentation: Ranges may be constructed using the s..e and s...e literals Those created using ... exclude the end value


1

You could define the enum as flags enum [Flags] enum ObjType { None = 0, A = 1 << 0, B = 1 << 1, C = 1 << 2, D = 1 << 3, E = 1 << 4, F = 1 << 5, G = 1 << 6, H = 1 << 7, MyCombination1 = A | B | D, MyCombination2 = C | F | G | H } Like this you can define up to 32 ...


1

Generally speaking, there's nothing wrong with your code. It's idiomatic C#. If, by "optimize", you mean "get rid of all the redundancy", I would suggest the following: var relevantTypes = new[] { ObjType.B, ObjType.D, ObjType.E, ... }; if (relevantTypes.Contains(instance.ObjType)) doSmth(); The local variable is just an example, personally, I'd ...


1

You can also use any() >>> l = [1, 4, 4, 5, 3, 7, 8] >>> any(l.count(x) > 1 for x in l) True >>> l = [1, 4, 5, 3, 7, 8] >>> any(l.count(x) > 1 for x in l) False


1

Since the answer of Prakash works, I think this is more straightforward: import_data = [ ["mario", "blue", "SGC", "CJ672PA0"], ["solid snake", "green", "NID", "VI6965KD"], ["samus", "maroon", "TRUST", "DNYU6539"], ["deckard cain", "purple", "JAFA", "SJW252MZ"], ["wedge", "yellow", "WALTER", "UJ28NVM1"] ] current_data = [ ["gordon", "orange", ...


1

One way to accomplish what you are doing: import_data = [ ["mario", "blue", "SGC", "CJ672PA0"], ["solid snake", "green", "NID", "VI6965KD"], ["samus", "maroon", "TRUST", "DNYU6539"], ["deckard cain", "purple", "JAFA", "SJW252MZ"], ["wedge", "yellow", "WALTER", "UJ28NVM1"] ...


1

An implementation similar to @Razib's solution above: public String removeDupes(String in) { if (in == null || in.length() == 0) { return in; } char lastLetter = in.charAt(0); String out = String.valueOf(lastLetter); for (int i = 1; i < in.length(); i++) { char nextLetter = in.charAt(i); if (nextLetter != lastLetter) { out ...


1

Steps: Scan the String from first to last Add each character in in a char type variable temp Compare each character to the temp except for the first (marked by index 0) character and delete the duplicate


1

This should do it String word = "AABBSTUUUX"; for (int i = 0; i < word.length() - 1; i++) { if (word.charAt(i) == word.charAt(i + 1)) { word.deleteCharAt(i + 1); } } System.out.println(word);


1

You can find the length of the set intersection using & like this: len(set(list1) & set(list2)) Example: >>>len(set(['cat','dog','pup']) & set(['rat','cat','wolf'])) 1 >>>set(['cat','dog','pup']) & set(['rat','cat','wolf']) {'cat'} Alternatively, if you don't want to use sets for some reason, you can always use ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible