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6

You can load the projects using jdt and eclipse core libraries. Using the following code you can load all the projects in the workspace. IWorkspace workspace = ResourcesPlugin.getWorkspace(); IWorkspaceRoot root = workspace.getRoot(); // Get all projects in the workspace IProject[] projects = root.getProjects(); Then you can get packages and in turn the ...


6

What version of eclipse? It is possible to launch the JDT compiler via ant. See: http://help.eclipse.org/ganymede/topic/org.eclipse.jdt.doc.isv/guide/jdt_api_compile.htm See 'Using the ant javac adapter' Warnings and errors are attached to resources (such as files or CompilationUnits) in the Eclipse workspace. They are known as 'markers'. It may be ...


5

extern int foo; This is a declaration. It tells the compiler "there's going to be an variable called foo of type int in the global namespace defined somewhere". int main(){ int foo = 7; // ... } This defines a local variable foo of type int inside the function main() and initializes it to 7. This local variable is not visible outside of ...


4

A package body is the implementation of a package specification. No offense, but you need to familiarize yourself with some basic Ada programming concepts. Maybe start with Lovelace Tutorial, it's an oldie but a goodie.


3

No, it's not okay, it's UB. Inlined definitions must be the same across the entire program. If you want to have additional logic used in some places, but not all, just make it another member (also writing CArray is silly): struct silly_array { T& operator[](int x) { /* unchecked */ } T& at(int x) { /* check bounds */ return (*this)[x]; } }; ...


2

You forgot to read the rest of the sentence you quoted. 7.1.2(4) "An inline function shall be defined in every translation unit in which it is used and shall have exactly the same definition in every case (3.2)."


2

Those compiler messages can't belong to the code you posted (because it doesn't have 28 lines). In any case, GCC will expect this code to be in a file mypackage.adb; and will require there to be a package spec in mypackage.ads.


2

Given that Eclipse doesn't do AST differencing, perhaps what the OP wanted to find differences between two files in terms of the language constructs ignoring white spaces and comments. Our Smart Differencer tool compares two source files in terms of the langauge constructs (variables, expressions, statements, blocks, methods, ...) and describes the ...


2

As already stated by others, the main benefit of decomposing a program into different compilation units is readability. Shorter compilation times is somehow a nice side-effect of the idea. If you care about inlining, you can resort to Link Time Code Generation and Link-Time Optimization. The combination of program decomposition into compilation units and ...


2

Some compilers/linkers are able to automatically inline functions even when they are defined in one compilation unit and used in another. Microsoft's linker can certainly do this. To me the main benefit of splitting code into separate compilation units is the overall organization of the code and I always make decisions based on this fact rather than the ...


2

This statement extern int foo; is a declaration of name foo. It is not the definition of foo. You have to initialize this variable that it would be a definition. For example extern int foo = 0; Though I do not see a sense in your code. Maybe you meant the following. I suppose that the variable defined in the module because I do not see a sense of ...


1

Don't worry about the first 3 of your 4 examples. Usage of interfaces (or classes with many subclasses) on the client side has no cost: Unnecessary classes can be detected easily by analyzing which classes are ever instantiated. If in doubt, examine a compile report. However, this is impossible in GWT-RPC for server side calls: The client has no way to ...


1

May be you can look at how Eclipse does something similar in its org.eclipse.jdt.internal.ui.javaeditor.EditorUtility class. You can see (line 222 and following) it: final IEditorInput input= editor.getEditorInput(); marker= ((IFileEditorInput)input).getFile().createMarker(IMarker.TEXT); marker.setAttribute(IMarker.CHAR_START, offset); ...


1

I suggest to have a look at the code in Apache Commons JCI. It implements an eclipse compiler for standalone applications.



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