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16

The simplest way I can find to work around this issue is to simply switch the order of multiplication. If in testcplx.pyx I change varc128 = varc128 * varf64 to varc128 = varf64 * varc128 I change from the failing situation to described to one that works correctly. This scenario is useful as it allows a direct diff of the produced C code. tl;dr The ...


11

The behaviour of the program depends on the language standard mode of gcc: There is a gcc extension for a built-in literal suffix i that produces C99 complex numbers. Those are distinct built-in types like _Complex double, as opposed to the "user-defined" class (template specialization) std::complex<double> used in C++. In C++14, C++ now has a ...


7

DON'T REINVENT THE WHEEL The builtin standard libraries are already optimized and tuned for your hardware. Don't waste your time trying to make something that will only be a fraction of how good the defaults are. If you find that on a particular routine the profile shows that it's slow, use a better library such as the ones offered by Intel or GNU's ...


7

No, there is one point for each matrix element. set.seed(42) mat <- matrix(complex(real = rnorm(16), imaginary = rlnorm(16)), 4) plot(mat) points(Re(mat[1,1]), Im(mat[1,1]), col = "red", pch = ".", cex = 5) Look for the red dot: You'd get the same plot, if you plotted a vector instead of a matrix, i.e., plot(c(mat)). This happens because ...


6

You do not know what order the comparisons are done in, or even which items are compared, which means you can't really know what effect your __lt__ will have. Your defined __lt__ sometimes depends on the actual values, and sometimes on the string representations of the types, but both versions may be used for the same object in the course of the sort. This ...


6

Looking at what we can pass to spzeros: julia> methods(spzeros) # 5 methods for generic function "spzeros": spzeros(m::Integer,n::Integer) at sparse/sparsematrix.jl:406 spzeros(Tv::Type{T<:Top},m::Integer,n::Integer) at sparse/sparsematrix.jl:407 spzeros(Tv::Type{T<:Top},Ti::Type{T<:Top},m::Integer,n::Integer) at sparse/sparsematrix.jl:409 ...


5

I assume 1D DFT/IDFT ... All DFT's use this formula: X(k) is transformed sample value (complex domain) x(n) is input data sample value (real or complex domain) N is number of samples/values in your dataset this whole thing is usually multiplied by normalization constant c as you can see for single value you need N computations so for all samples it is ...


5

Part 1: It's possible that math.h is including complex.h which would create this macro: #define complex _Complex I'd suggest renaming your complex type, or use the builtin one described here. You could also get away with doing #undef complex after #include <main.h>, but for large programs that's probably not sustainable. Part 2: You're using the ...


5

The difference is that on Linux, you're using libstdc++ and glibc, and on MacOS you're using libc++ and whatever CRT MacOS uses. The MacOS version is correct. (Also, your workaround is completely broken and insanely dangerous.) Here's what I think happens. There are multiple overloads of conj in the environment. C++98 brings in a single template, which ...


5

Mathematically speaking, there is no ordering defined for complex numbers, which is why there is no operator< defined for complex. You can try inventing your own ordering function (such as ordering them lexicographically) but that requires writing your own comparator function: template <class T> bool complex_comparator(const complex<T> ...


5

I'm not sure if there is a built-in operation for this, but I do see a speed increase by not using complex function: >> imag(vec) + real(vec)*1i ans = 11.0000 + 1.0000i 22.0000 + 2.0000i 33.0000 + 3.0000i and also this way >> conj(vec)*1i ans = 11.0000 + 1.0000i 22.0000 + 2.0000i 33.0000 + 3.0000i which I think looks a lot ...


5

You don't really want to convert a float64 to complex128 but rather you want to construct a complex128 value where you specify the real part. For that can use the builtin complex() function: func complex(r, i FloatType) ComplexType Using it your sqrt() function: func sqrt(x float64) string { if x < 0 { return ...


4

imx_vector[i].real() as well as imx_vector[i].imag() return the double, not double&. You probably meant (C++98): imx_vector[i] = std::complex<double>(0.0, mx_vector[i]); or (C++11): imx_vector[i].real(0.0); imx_vector[i].imag(mx_vector[i]);


4

Fortran 2008 allows complex argument. Some compilers already allow this. If your does not (as, e.g., ifort 15.0), compute it using exp(). cosh(x) = ( exp(x) + exp(-x) ) / 2 or use the identity cosh(x+iy) = cosh(x) * cos(y) + i * sinh(x) * sin(y)


4

There are at least two bugs I spot. The one causing your problem is that your base case for (^%) is too high, so > (1,1) ^% 0 *** Exception: stack overflow Fix it by changing the base case to k ^% 0 = (1, 0) The second is that you have no base case for vredKompPol, which you can fix by adding a clause like vredKompPol [] _ = (0, 0) With these two ...


4

There is a 'complex' and an 'imaginary' data type in C. However, since it has only been a few years since it has been introduced, some of the old systems might not support it. So, its best to handle that kind of solutions explicitly. If you are performing an illegal operation like sqrt(-1), then it will generate an error. The following post most ...


4

Just use the constructor for Complex: Complex[] complexArray = new Complex[16384]; for (int i = 0; i < complexArray.Length; i++) ( complexArray[i] = new Complex(realArray[i], imaginaryArray[i]); } Optionally, you can then reduce the amount of code (slight performance cost) by using LINQ: var complexArray = realArray.Zip(imaginaryArray, (a, b) ...


4

std::sort does not have a built-in function for sorting complex numbers, so you have to write your own comparator function and pass it as an argument in sort() as sort(vector.begin(),vector.end(),myWay); The myWay function is defined as bool myWay(complex<double> a, complex<double> b) { if (real(a) == real(b)) return imag(a) < ...


4

As you have noted, the fftw_plan_dft_1d function computes the standard FFT Yk of the complex input sequence Xn defined as where j=sqrt(-1), for all values k=0,...,N-1 (thus generating N complex outputs in the array out), . You may notice that since the input happens to be real, the output exhibits Hermitian symmetry, that is for N=8: out[4] == ...


4

Add +0j to your real inputs to make them complex numbers. Numpy is following a variation of the maxim "Garbage in, Garbage out." Float in, float out. >>> import numpy as np >>> np.sqrt(-1) __main__:1: RuntimeWarning: invalid value encountered in sqrt nan Complex in, complex out. >>> numpy.sqrt(-1+0j) 1j >>> ...


4

Your add member function promises to return a ComplexNumber but it doesn't. You then attempt to use the return value, invoking undefined behaviour. squared is similarly broken. You need to figure out whether you want add to implement the behaviour of operator += or +. In the first case, you'd need to return a reference to the object being modified: ...


4

It is definitely a rounding error. Note that if you add parentheses, your results change: >> 10 * (x * conj(x)); ans = 2.5920e+05


3

This is commonly referred to FAQ 7.31 which says: The only numbers that can be represented exactly in R’s numeric type are integers and fractions whose denominator is a power of 2. Other numbers have to be rounded to (typically) 53 binary digits accuracy. As a result, two floating point numbers will not reliably be equal unless they have been computed by ...


3

Maybe this does what you want: Edit: Flattened the structure, so it is now closer to what you originally had in mind, and you can save it using savetxt. import numpy m = 15 rows = 5 integers = [('f'+str(i), numpy.int64) for i in range(m)] dt = numpy.dtype([('comp', numpy.complex)] + integers) fields = numpy.zeros(rows, dtype=dt) fields['comp'] += 1j fmt ...


3

The problem is that your implementation of %^ is only defined for n >= 1, but you're trying to use it with n = 0, which never reaches the base case (n = 1). Now, hugs is out of development so I would recommend using ghci instead. In ghci, you can debug similar problems like this: [jakob:~]$ ghci foo.hs GHCi, version 7.8.4: http://www.haskell.org/ghc/ ...


3

From here: for complex matrices, it is almost always the case that the combined operation of taking the transpose and complex conjugate arises in physical or computation contexts and virtually never the transpose in isolation (Strang 1988, pp. 220-221). In matlab if you want to transpose without conjugating use .'.


3

Sebastian Redl's answer explains why your code didn't compile with libc++ but did with libstdc++. if is not the static if that exists in some languages; even if the code in an if branch is 100% dead, it must still be valid code. In any event, this feels like a massive amount of unnecessary complexity to me. Not everything has to be a template. Especially ...


3

There are the following functions: abs: gives complex magnitude; angle: gives phase angle, in radians. You can convert to degrees with radtodeg or rad2deg (or just multiplying by 180/pi): Example: > A = [ sqrt(2)*[1-1i 1+1i; 1i -1]]; >> abs(A) ans = 2.0000 2.0000 1.4142 1.4142 >> radtodeg(angle(A)) ans = -45 45 ...


3

To build on what Luis Mendo was talking about, I don't believe there is a utility in MATLAB that prints out a complex number in polar form. However, we can use abs and angle to our advantage as these determine the magnitude and phase of a complex number. With these, we can define an auxiliary function that helps print out the magnitude and phase of a ...


3

It looks to me like it works, but the line width of your arrows is too small for you to see. You can increase it by assigning a handle to the quiver plot like so: hQuiver = quiver(x,y1,Dx,Dy); And then, after the plot is created, change any of its many properties like so: set(hQuiver,'LineWidth',4) or do it all in the call to quiver: hQuiver = ...



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