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10

I wrote the following: https://github.com/dankogai/swift-complex Just add complex.swift to your project and you can go like: let z = 1-1.i It has all functions and operators that of C++11 covers. Unlike C++11 complex.swift is not generic -- z.real and z.imag are always Double. But the necessity for complex integer is very moot and IMHO it should be ...


9

Not metadata, just the sign bit of the double precision float. >> a = 0-j; >> b = -j; >> ra = real(a) ra = 0 >> rb = real(b) rb = 0 >> ra==0 ans = 1 >> isequal(ra,rb) ans = 1 Looks the same so far. However, the difference is that with b, we set the sign bit for both the real and imaginary parts when ...


6

You do not know what order the comparisons are done in, or even which items are compared, which means you can't really know what effect your __lt__ will have. Your defined __lt__ sometimes depends on the actual values, and sometimes on the string representations of the types, but both versions may be used for the same object in the course of the sort. This ...


6

Looking at what we can pass to spzeros: julia> methods(spzeros) # 5 methods for generic function "spzeros": spzeros(m::Integer,n::Integer) at sparse/sparsematrix.jl:406 spzeros(Tv::Type{T<:Top},m::Integer,n::Integer) at sparse/sparsematrix.jl:407 spzeros(Tv::Type{T<:Top},Ti::Type{T<:Top},m::Integer,n::Integer) at sparse/sparsematrix.jl:409 ...


5

It's because you're using the comma operator, so the complex values will be initialized with 2 and 4 respectively. Replace the parentheses with curly-braces instead: std::complex<double> Uf[2]={{1, 2},{3, 4}}; If the above doesn't work, your compiler is not C++11 compatible, and you have to explicitly create the array complex members: ...


5

Part 1: It's possible that math.h is including complex.h which would create this macro: #define complex _Complex I'd suggest renaming your complex type, or use the builtin one described here. You could also get away with doing #undef complex after #include <main.h>, but for large programs that's probably not sustainable. Part 2: You're using the ...


5

The difference is that on Linux, you're using libstdc++ and glibc, and on MacOS you're using libc++ and whatever CRT MacOS uses. The MacOS version is correct. (Also, your workaround is completely broken and insanely dangerous.) Here's what I think happens. There are multiple overloads of conj in the environment. C++98 brings in a single template, which ...


5

If your real and imaginary parts are the slices along the last dimension and your array is contiguous along the last dimension, you can just do A.view(dtype=np.complex128) If you are using single precision floats, this would be A.view(dtype=np.complex64) Here is a fuller example import numpy as np from numpy.random import rand # Randomly choose real ...


5

The expressions af./bf and af.*conj(bf)./abs(bf).^2 are completely equivalent in MATLAB, if that's what you're asking. There is no clear connection, however, between that question and the example you've shown. abs(bf).^2 does not appear in the denominator in your example. The only reason conj() is being used in the code you've shown is because it is the ...


5

The standard says in [complex.numbers] (26.4/3): If the result of a function is not mathematically defined or not in the range of representable values for its type, the behavior is undefined. There are no specifics on how division should be implemented for complex numbers. Only in [complex.member.ops] it says: complex<T>& ...


5

The pgplot library offers a strideless interface to draw marker arrays: void cpgpt(int n, const float *xpts, const float *ypts, int symbol); But this is just a thin wrapper around individual calls to cpgpt1. Thus, it's easy enough to add a stride-taking interface: void cpgpts(int n, int stride, const float *xpts, const float *ypts, int symbol) { for ...


4

Given: float _Complex data[N]; We know that: float *ptr = (float *) data; ptr[2 * n + 0] <- real part. ptr[2 * n + 1] <- imaginary part. We can see some rationalization here. Basically, a float _Complex will have the same memory layout as float[2]. Modifying this such that all of the reals are contiguous would require a similar operation to your ...


4

imx_vector[i].real() as well as imx_vector[i].imag() return the double, not double&. You probably meant (C++98): imx_vector[i] = std::complex<double>(0.0, mx_vector[i]); or (C++11): imx_vector[i].real(0.0); imx_vector[i].imag(mx_vector[i]);


4

Ok so I have this wild guess, that in clang the complex number division is implemented like described on wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_number#Multiplication_and_division. One can see that the denominator is in the form c^2 + d^2. So 1.e-162 squared actually falls out of the IEE754 representable range for double which is ...


4

you are initializing i to sqrt(1) whereas you probably thought about sqrt(-1). As such it would be evaluated as a double expression (after -1 is converted to double as the closest matching sqrt, see Mike's comment for complete sequence), which according to cplusplus.com generates a domain error for negative arguments. Instead you can initialize i as: ...


4

In 100% standard C++, you just plain cannot include standard headers in an extern "C" block. You would need to modify your include.h header to be C++-friendly, by first including its required headers outside of extern "C", and declaring its own names inside an extern "C" block. 17.6.2.2 Headers [using.headers] [...] 3 A translation unit shall ...


4

There is a 'complex' and an 'imaginary' data type in C. However, since it has only been a few years since it has been introduced, some of the old systems might not support it. So, its best to handle that kind of solutions explicitly. If you are performing an illegal operation like sqrt(-1), then it will generate an error. The following post most ...


4

I assume 1D DFT/IDFT ... All DFT's use this formula: X(k) is transformed sample value (complex domain) x(n) is input data sample value (real or complex domain) N is number of samples/values in your dataset this whole thing is usually multiplied by normalization constant c as you can see for single value you need N computations so for all samples it is ...


4

Fortran 2008 allows complex argument. Some compilers already allow this. If your does not (as, e.g., ifort 15.0), compute it using exp(). cosh(x) = ( exp(x) + exp(-x) ) / 2 or use the identity cosh(x+iy) = cosh(x) * cos(y) + i * sinh(x) * sin(y)


4

There are at least two bugs I spot. The one causing your problem is that your base case for (^%) is too high, so > (1,1) ^% 0 *** Exception: stack overflow Fix it by changing the base case to k ^% 0 = (1, 0) The second is that you have no base case for vredKompPol, which you can fix by adding a clause like vredKompPol [] _ = (0, 0) With these two ...


3

The problem is that your implementation of %^ is only defined for n >= 1, but you're trying to use it with n = 0, which never reaches the base case (n = 1). Now, hugs is out of development so I would recommend using ghci instead. In ghci, you can debug similar problems like this: [jakob:~]$ ghci foo.hs GHCi, version 7.8.4: http://www.haskell.org/ghc/ ...


3

Maybe this does what you want: Edit: Flattened the structure, so it is now closer to what you originally had in mind, and you can save it using savetxt. import numpy m = 15 rows = 5 integers = [('f'+str(i), numpy.int64) for i in range(m)] dt = numpy.dtype([('comp', numpy.complex)] + integers) fields = numpy.zeros(rows, dtype=dt) fields['comp'] += 1j fmt ...


3

From here: for complex matrices, it is almost always the case that the combined operation of taking the transpose and complex conjugate arises in physical or computation contexts and virtually never the transpose in isolation (Strang 1988, pp. 220-221). In matlab if you want to transpose without conjugating use .'.


3

When I encounter this type of problem I try to rewrite my function as an array of real and imaginary parts. For example, if f is your function which takes complex input array x (say x has size 2, for simplicity) from numpy import * def f(x): # Takes a complex-valued vector of size 2 and outputs a complex-valued vector of size 2 return ...


3

Thanks Warren Weckesser! The link you suggested helped me a lot. I now have two working scripts: one for writing complex numbers using numpy.savetxt and one for reading/loading the complex numbers from the file using numpy.loadtxt. For future references, the codes are listed below. Writing: import numpy d1 = -0.240921619563-0.0303165074169j d2 = ...


3

import numpy as np import pylab as plt import itertools n = 13 roots = np.roots( [1,] + [0,]*(n-1) + [-1,] ) colors = itertools.cycle(['r', 'g', 'b', 'y']) plt.figure(figsize=(6,6)) for root in roots: plt.arrow(0,0,root.real,root.imag,ec=colors.next()) plt.xlim(-1.5,1.5) plt.ylim(-1.5,1.5) plt.show() The roots of unity are calculated in a manner ...


3

Use B = [(5.7955+1.5529i) 0].' which is actually element-wise transpose and not B = [(5.7955+1.5529i) 0]' which is conjugate transpose. One can also use an explicit call to transpose command - B = transpose([(5.7955+1.5529i) 0])


3

You just need one more line: C=complex(C{1,1},C{1,2})


3

I would like to create a new unary mark that designates a constant number in the code to be interpreted as a member of a created datatype. You can use user defined literals that were introduced in C++11. As an example, assuming you have a class type Type and you want to use the num_y syntax, where num is a NumericType, you can do: Type operator"" ...


3

No. You may import the Accelerate module via import Accelerate and use the DSPComplex type. Refer to the documentation for more detail.



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