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0

Wikipedia says :- Big O notation describes the limiting behavior of a function when the argument tends towards a particular value or infinity, usually in terms of simpler functions. A description of a function in terms of big O notation usually only provides an upper bound on the growth rate of the function. An upper bound means that f(n) = n ...


-2

None of the options are of order n^2. (15^10) * n + 12099 is of order n n^1.98 is of order n^1.98 n^3 / (sqrt(n)) is of order n^2.5 (2^20) * n is of order n You can check whether two functions are of the same order, by dividing one over the other. It should tend to go to a constant when n goes to infinity.


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NP-hard problems do not have to be in NP (they do not have to be decision problems). The precise definition here is that a problem X is NP-hard if there is an NP-complete problem Y such that Y is reducible to X in polynomial time. But since any NP-complete problem can be reduced to any other NP-complete problem in polynomial time, all NP-complete problems ...


2

Your current inorder traversal using recursion to perform the task. That makes it difficult to run more than one at the same time. So, first I would re-write the method to use an explicit stack (example here in C#). Now, duplicate all of the state so that we perform traversals of both trees at the same time. At any point where we're ready to yield a value ...


1

These refer to how long it takes a program to run. Problems in class P can be solved with algorithms that run in polynomial time. Say you have an algorithm that finds the smallest integer in an array. One way to do this is by iterating over all the integers of the array and keeping track of the smallest number you've seen up to that point. Every time you ...


2

What you propose is a distribution sort called count sort, only a simpler version where you know that elements are not duplicated, so counting stops at 1. It is very efficient in time O(N+n) but does require O(N) space. Many people will naturally use this method when asked to sort a deck of cards: they will dispatch each card to its position on the table ...


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Basically, work is done only on non-leaf nodes while building a heap...and the work done is the amount of swapping down to satisfy heap condition...in other words (in worst case) the amount is proportional to the height of the node...all in all the complexity of the problem is proportional to the sum of heights of all the non-leaf nodes..which is (2^h+1 - ...


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The value of k is not the same in the first approach and the one you propose. Assume you have n numbers between 0 and N. In the first case (buckets of size ten) you need N/10 bucket, in the second case (buckets of size one) N buckets. Depending on the relative values of N and n, there will be an optimal for k which may not be k=1.


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First of all, I assume that you are considering the addition to temp as the operation that has the cost you want to estimate. I refer to the initial value of n as N to distinguish between current and initial values. Moreover, I assume n is integral and that the step of the for loop is 1. As n is halved in each iteration, the outer loop executes log N (base ...


4

At the first iteration of the outer loop, the inner loop will be executed n times. At the next iteration, the inner loop will be executed n/2 times, and so on... So, we have the sum of geometric series n + n/2 + n/4 + ... i.e. 2*n or O(n).


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In the third case of the Master Theorem, you don't have to represent f in terms of log, you have to bound f from below by n^{log_b a + \epsilon}. (In this case, the theorem basically says for f(n) bigger than some power of n and satisfying the regularity condition, the asymptotic behavior of T is pretty much that of f.) In your case, a=16, b=4, log_b a = ...


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In Java, You can use a HashMap to store the key as the word and the value as the reversed word. For every word, check if it exists in the hashmap, if yes, then fetch the value. If it does not, reverse the word and add it to the hashmap. You can use the reverse method of the StringBuilder Class to reverse a word in place.


3

You can first search for those substrings using Knuth-Morris-Pratt and then you can simply replace them with the reverse order. As I've passed my Data Structure course in university, this algorithm has a very good performance, in time complexity point of view.


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Your question isn't so much about algorithms, or complexity, but about inversions of math formulas. It's easy to solve for n in n^k = N in a closed form. Unfortunately, for most other functions it is either not known or known that it is not possible. In particular, for n log(n), the solution involves the Lambert function, which doesn't help you much. In ...


1

If and when you get confused in recursion, substitute the recursive call (mentally, of course) as a loop. For example, in your above function, you can imagine the recursive calls to be inside a "while loop". Since, it is now a while loop executed till the time all n nodes are traversed, complexity is O(n).


5

Sometimes you can simplify calculations by calculating the amount of time per item in the result rather than solving recurrence relations. That trick applies here. Start by changing the code to this obviously equivalent form: private static IntTreeNode createBST(int[] array, int left, int right) { int middle = array[(left + right)/2; IntTreeNode ...


0

At first, I want to ask you a question: Why using list? Can we use array instead of list? For example, Assume that we are in array[i][j]: if we want to move right, then we are in array[i][j+1] if we want to move down, we are in array[i+1][j] So I think we should just use Array to present our datastructures. You picked up that DFS can solve your ...


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The formula for summation of a Geometric Series for elements a, ar, ar^2,...,ar^n-1 is given by S(n) = a((r^n)-1)/(r-1) // in case of r>1 The subproblem size for for a node at a depth i is n/(2^i). Thus, the subproblem hits size 1 when n/(2^i) = 1, or equivalently, when i=log2n. Each level has 4 times more nodes than the level above, and so the ...


0

From root to leaf, each level of the tree sees n halves, thus the tree has log2(n) levels. The sum would then be: n + 2n + ... + 2 ^ (log2(n)) * n = n * (1 + 2 + ... + 2 ^ log2(n)) = n * (2 ^ (log2(n) + 1) - 1) = n * (2 * n - 1) = 2 * n ^ 2 - n = O(n ^ 2) All the analysis above assumes n is a power of 2, but as in the majority of the cases, the ...


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For some background on complexity and higher-order functions, see, e.g., Hofmann, Martin. An Application of Category-Theoretic Semantics to the Characterisation of Complexity Classes Using Higher-Order Function Algebras. Bull. Symbolic Logic 3 (1997), no. 4, 469--486. http://projecteuclid.org/euclid.bsl/1182353537.


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In virtually all cases, when the documentation of an higher order function states its complexity is O(f(n)), this is assuming that the higher order function has constant time complexity O(1). Further, the exact meaning of n can vary, but when not explicitly stated it should be clear from the context: e.g. the length of a list, the number of ...


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You seem to have a (common) misunderstanding that complexity is a function of n. What is n? n is just one parameter that measures something about your input. It might not be a sufficient (or even necessary) statistic for describing your input -- you might need other variables to accurately describe the complexity of your input. So, map and filter are are ...


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It is linear: %timeit max_list11(range(10)) 100000 loops, best of 3: 6.93 µs per loop %timeit max_list11(range(100)) 10000 loops, best of 3: 66.7 µs per loop %timeit max_list11(range(1000)) 1000 loops, best of 3: 775 µs per loop %timeit max_list11(range(10000)) 100 loops, best of 3: 9.82 ms per loop Always use timeit.default_timer() for time stamps. Or ...


0

Recursive method decreases the input size by one each call, so it's theoretically linear (since you're essentially doing a linear search for the maximum). The implementation of Python's lists is going to distort a timer-based analysis.


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No, you cannot solve it using Mater-theorem. You need to solve it using Akra–Bazzi method, a cleaner generalization of the well-known master theorem. Master-theorem assumes that the sub-problems have equal size. The master theorem concerns recurrence relations of the form T(n) = a T(n/b) + f(n) , where a>=1, b>1. I am not deriving here the steps ...


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I don't think your approach is correct in the general case. When you throw away the T(n/2) term to calculate the complexity of the T(n-1) term you end up underestimating the size of the T(n-1) term. For a concrete counterexample: T(n) = T(n-1) + T(n-2) + 1 Your technique is also going to come up with T(n) = O(n^2) for this but the real complexity is ...


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Using O(n^1/4) is perfectly fine for big O notation. Here are some examples of fractures in exponents from real life examples O(n) is also correct (because big O giving only upper bound), but it is not tight, so n^1/4 is in O(n), but not in Theta(n) n^1/4 is NOT in O(log(n)) (proof guidelines follows). For any value r>0, and for large enough value of ...


-1

Here's my calculation for how they got O(n^2) We'll ignore the CPU time for declaring the StringBuffer, as it doesn't vary with the size of the final string. When calculating the O complexity we are concerned with the worst case, this will occur when there are 1 letter Strings. I shall explain after this example: Let's say we have 4 one-letter strings: ...


3

The answer for the second example is not nlogn. You cannot simply multiply the bounds of two for loops to each other. The second loop form a sigma since the second loop moves from 1 to i that can be at most nlogn. This sigma would be 1+2+...+nlogn... The summation of this sigma can be found using the formula of the sum of natural numbers. Therefore the sigma ...


3

Answering for the first part :- for i = 1 to 526 for j = 1 to n^2(lgn)^3 for k = 1 to n x=x+1 This program will run 526 * n^2 * (lg n)^3 * n times = 526 * n^3 * (lg n)^3 times. So, x = x +1 will be executed 526 * n^3 * (lg n)^3 times. Coming to Big-theta notation, As n is always greater than (lg n) for any n>1, so, c1 * n^3 <= 526 * ...


3

Outermost loop will run for ceil(log n) times. The middle loop is dependent on the value of i. So, it's behaviour will be : 1st iteration of outermost-loop - 1 2nd iteration of outermost-loop - 2 ..................................... ceil(log n) iteration of outermost-loop - ceil(log n) Innermost loop is independent of other variables an will ...


-1

You have three loops. Lets consider one by one. Innermost loop: It is independent of a n or i, and will run always 10 times. So time complexity of this loop is Theta(10). Outermost loop: Very simply time complexity of this loop is Theta(logn). Middle loop: As value of i can be upto logn time complexity of this loop is also O(logn) Overall complexity: ...


0

If you have a suitable notion of infinity in your head, then there is a very brief description: Big O notation tells you the cost of solving an infinitely large problem. And furthermore Constant factors are negligible If you upgrade to a computer that can run your algorithm twice as fast, big O notation won't notice that. Constant factor ...


0

Summarizing the discussion above, there is not really any way answer to my question actually. As mentioned by @j_random_hacker each byte used for graph storage is read or written at least once. The space-complexity of a graph being O(n^2) in the worst case, there is no way to optimize the time-complexity any more. @amit suggested to use Jaccard similarity ...


3

As always, there can be a difference of the complexity of an algorithm and its implementation. If you implement binary search in a recursive function, that takes a copy of a part of the input array, this array has to be generated in O(n), so you are right, that this would lead to an overall complexity of O(n log n) (maybe worse, depending on what exactly ...


-1

Take a look at Master Theorem. T(n) = T(n/2) + 3 log a / log b = 1 d = 1 Thus O(n) = O(log n)


0

You can try drawing the recursion tree for:T(n) = T(n-1) + T(n-2) + O(1) However, if you know Binet's Formula (here): F_n = ((1+sqrt(5))^n - (1-sqrt(5))^n)/(2^n * sqrt(5)) as n->oo: F_n = ((1+sqrt(5))/2)^n Which is exponential. (can't post latex images cause reputation)


3

Assume each step takes time C. For k-loop, time taken is Cn. For j-loop, time taken to complete iteration is (Cn)n/4=C(n^2)/4 For i-loop, time taken to complete iteration is (C*(n^2)/4)n/2=C(n^3)/8 So Total time taken=(C/8)*(n^3) As C/8 is a constant it can be ignored when considering Big-O Notation. Thus, Time Complexity=O(n^3).


4

start with inner loop : for(int k = 0; k < n; k++) x++; is obviously O(n). now one layer above that : for(int j = 0; j < n/4; j++) is O(n) because it takes n/4 for j to reach the n and we know that O(n/4) = O(n) and like this for outer loop is O(n).so the complexity is O(n^3) because you have three nested loop each with O(n) and non of ...


2

for(int i = 0; i < n/2; i++) --> n/2 for(int j = 0; j < n/4; j++) --> n/4 for(int k = 0; k < n; k++) --> n x++; Hence total complexity is O((n^3)/8) which is O(n^3)


0

Let T(n) be the number of operations performed for the input n. Each iteration performs O(1) operations. So: T(n) = O(1) + T(n/5) = O(1) + O(1) + T(n/25) = 2*O(1) + T(n/25) = 2*O(1) + O(1) + T(n/125) = 3*O(1) + T(n/125) Each iteration add O(1) to the complexity and you will run until n/(5^a) < 1 where a is the number of iterations performed ...


3

In each iteration x is divided by 5. How many iterations would it take for x to become lower than 1 (and therefore 0)? The answer is log5(n) (logarithm to the base 5 of n), which is O(log(n)).


1

Formal definitions of O notations are: f(n) = O(g(n)) means that there exists some constant c and n0 that f(n) <= c*g(n) for n >= n0. f(n) = Ω(g(n)) means that there exists some constant c and n0 that f(n) >= c*g(n) for n >= n0. f(n) = Θ(g(n)) means that there exists some constants c1 and c2 and n0 that f(n) >= c1*g(n) and f(n) <= ...


0

The log* N bit is an iterated algorithm which grows very slowly, much slower than just log N. You basically just keep iteratively 'logging' the answer until it gets below one (E.g: log(log(log(...log(N)))), and the number of times you had to log() is the answer. Anyway, this is a five-year old question on Stackoverflow, but no code?(!) Let's fix that - ...


0

If you implement the 2-way partitioning algorithm then at every step the array will be halved. This is because when identical keys will be encountered, the scan stops. As a result at each step, the partitioning element will be positioned at the center of the subarray thereby halving the array in every subsequent recursive call. Now, this case is similar to ...


1

Explanation There are a few reasons: liblzma, when not in RAW mode, adds a header describing the dictionary size and a few other settings. That is one of the reasons it grows in size. LZMA, like a lot of other compressors, uses a range encoder to encode the output of the dictionary compression (in essence a badass version of LZ77) in the least amount of ...


1

It's easy to see from calculus that if lim {n -> inf} a(n) / b(n) < inf then a(n) = O(b(n)) Also note that all the functions here go to infinity, so we can use L'Hôpital's rule. Finally, note that, asymptotically, Stirling's Approximation gives lim {n -> inf} n! / (sqrt(2 pi n) (n / e)^n) = 1 If you combine these three things you can see ...


2

O(f(n)) is a set of functions that grow proportionally to f(n) or slower. Ω(f(n)) is a set of functions that grow proportionally to f(n) or faster. There are many functions that grow at least as fast as n, but not faster than n^2. For example: n, n*log n, n^1.5, n^2.


0

Complexity is O(n^4), assuming you start from level==0. You have size recursive calls when level==0. Each of them is cuasing size recursive calls at level==1, totalling in size^2 so far. Each of them is causing size recursive calls at level==2, totalling in size^3. At level 3, each of these calls are looping size more times, giving you size^4 Assuming ...



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