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11

I just tried this tonight: public class State { public string Code { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } } public class MyWindowViewModel { ObservableCollection<State> _states = new ObservableCollection<State> { new State { Code = "FL", Name = "Florida" }, new State { Code = "CA", Name = "California" }, ...


8

Due to the issue with data binding on CollectionContainer as described http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/vstudio/en-US/b15cbd9d-95aa-47c6-8068-7ae9f7dca88a/collectioncontainer-does-not-support-relativesource?forum=wpf I now use the following approach: <ListBox> <ListBox.Resources> <CollectionViewSource x:Key="DogCollection" ...


6

Try this (msdn): <ComboBox x:Name="ComboBoxOperatingPoints" SelectionChanged="ComboBoxOperatingPoints_SelectionChanged" Width="200" Height="50" IsSynchronizedWithCurrentItem="True" DisplayMemberPath="name" SelectedValuePath="operating_point_id"> <ComboBox.Resources> ...


5

You can detect when the current item has changed by monitoring the ICollectionView.CurrentChanged event of your CollectionView. The following code works for me: CompositeCollection cc = new CompositeCollection(); cc.Add(new CollectionContainer { Collection = new string[] { "Oh No!", "Fie" } }); cc.Add(new CollectionContainer { Collection = new string[] { ...


3

There's no need to use any CompositeCollection to do what you want. You can extract all of the MyChild objects from all of the MyParent objects using the Enumerable.SelectMany Method in a simple LinQ query. Try this: using System.Linq; ... var children = YourParentCollection.SelectMany(i => i.MyChild).ToList(); If you're not familiar with these ...


3

Try this: foreach (var itm in cmpc.Cast<CollectionContainer>().SelectMany(x => x.Collection.Cast<string>()))


2

Use CollectionViewSource on your compositecollection, please take a look at http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2079553/how-to-handle-a-compositecollection-with-collectionview-features.


2

CompositeCollection does not implement IEditableCollectionView which is used by the datagrid to edit. I have had the same issues, and ended up doing my own fake composite collection on the view model, similiar to what you have, if all you are putting in your collection is two observable collections, its not to hard to track the changes listening to ...


2

Try giving name to your ListBox and refer its DataContext in binding: <ListBox x:Name="myList" ItemsSource="{DynamicResource MyColl}"> <ListBox.Resources> <CompositeCollection x:Key="MyColl"> <CollectionContainer Collection="{Binding DataContext.Dogs, Source={x:Reference myList}}"/> ...


2

There's a much simpler solution using basic Object Oriented Programming. Create a base data type and make all of your data objects extend from it. It could be empty, but if nothing else, you could implement INotifyPropertyChanged in it so you don't have to in each of the other data types. Then you simply add a property of type ...


2

I dont have a solution to your problem but rather an alternative. I personally have view models dedicated to each view. I would then have a property on the view model to add the null value as required. I prever this method since it allows for better unit testing of my viewmodel. For your example add: public class ZooViewModel { ..... public ...


1

This sounds like a problem for converter, unless you have good reason not to. public class CarMakeConverter : IValueConverter { public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture) { var input = (List<CarMakes>)value; return input.SelectMany(carMake=> carMake.Models); } ...


1

Here's a simple example (Tested). You will not see the second row because of the trigger. I'm using int values so I'm comparing to 20 in trigger. in your case, use x:Null. You can use the same technique with yours. XAML : <Window x:Class="DataGridTest.MainWindow" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" ...


1

I've found a thread on microsoft.com discussing that issue. Seems that this 'bug' is known for years, but has never been fixed. The workaround I'm using (CollectionViewSource) is suggested there, too. Furthermore, you can indeed not use ElementName. I don't know for what reason, but the workaround for ElementName is using x:Reference as suggested in ...


1

According to msdn (on CompositeCollection): Enables multiple collections and items to be displayed as a single list. Unless this is what you need (which I don't think it is), you should go for ObservableCollection<T>. Since it is generic, it saves you from unnecessary, error-prone castings. Removing the need to cast its elements also leads to a ...


1

you are right CompositeCollection has no notion of datacontext so it cant inherit it from its parent. from MSDN: CompositeCollection can contain items such as strings, objects, XML nodes, elements, as well as other collections. An ItemsControl uses the data in the CompositeCollection to generate its content according to its ItemTemplate. For more ...


1

Your ScriptParameterComboItem class must implement INotifyPropertyChanged. So when changing it's properties, listeners will be notified. Using ObservableCollection helps listeners to be notified when something is added to the collection or removed from. Not changing the actual data within every single item.


1

Finally figured out how to trigger the "SelectAll" property. Notice the: <ComboBoxItem> <CheckBox ... /> </ComboBoxItem> Generic.xaml ... <ComboBox.Resources> <ResourceDictionary> <CollectionViewSource x:Key="items" Source="{Binding ItemsSource, RelativeSource={RelativeSource TemplatedParent}, ...


1

Declare the CompositeCollection in ComboBox.Resources and use it with ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource myCompositeCollection}}" . <UserControl x.Class="My.Application.ClientControl" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" ...


1

This is happening because of the fact that ContextMenu is not in the same visual tree as its containing parent, resulting in data binding issues. Since the ContextMenu is not in the same visual tree, ElementName, RelativeSouce (FindAncestor), etc bindings will not work. You can get around this through In the code behind for the UserControl: ...


1

That "proof" of yours does not work because the two objects compared are obviously not equal. You cannot use RelativeSource or ElementName bindings in a collection container because the necessary conditions are not met, i.e. there is no NameScope and since the CollectionContainer is an abtract object which does not appear in the visual tree there also is not ...


1

you should extract data from cmpc items and set them as data source as list.ItemsSource won't understand that u need to set inner items of items as a datasource EDIT You can use this method List<string> GetData(CompositeCollection cmpc) { List<string> allStrings = new List<string>(); foreach (var item in ...


1

I've found out that this is solved as soon as you override the ToString()-Function of your Items-object, so that it returns what the items DataTemplate shows. A complete working example is here: --------> X dartrax


1

You can make use of IComparable and a interface for the object to be added into the collection You need to do the soer IComparable getName() // this shud return company/employee name in the compare method you can sort as per your requirement



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