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Supposing you want to reduce the executable file size, you can check your compiler options to reduce the obj size. If you are using GCC, check the manual for the options -s and -Os.


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Since all you can do is edit your source code, the only way to reduce the size of your executable is to find ways to consolidate stuff. Things to look out for: Find dead code and resources. Delete all functions/methods/variable that are not used. Find duplicate code and data. For example, if you have a function/method that is copy&pasted into several ...


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The code you've written is causing the ZipArchive class to write a whole new archive at the end of your previous one, which of course corrupts the file. The way to do what you want is to copy the original archive to a new file as you create it, and then replace the original with the new one. For example: string tempFile = Path.GetTempFileName(); using ...


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WinRAR compresses by default each file separately. So there is no real gain on compressing a folder structure with many similar or even identical files by default. But there is also the option to create a solid archive. Open help of WinRAR and open on Contents tab the item Archive types and parameters and click on Solid archives. This help page explains ...


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Is this algorithm standardized and used in other tools as well? The pack format is part of a public API: the transfer protocols used for push and fetch operations use it to send less data over the network. They are implemented in at least two other major Git implementations besides the reference: JGit and libgit2. Therefore, it is very unlikely that ...


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I will not comment or review your code. Deciphering regexes (in any flavor) is not my favorite hobby. Yes, compressing HTML makes sense if you aim to provide professional services. If I look at a HTML code of someone's site with lots of nonsense blank spaces and user-useless comments inside and the site disrespects Google's PageSpeed Insights Rules and ...


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Maybe *print-circle* is set to T. Hard to say, given your vague description. CL-USER 7 > (let ((foo '(BRANCA REDONDA BAIXA CHEIA))) (list foo foo)) (#1=(BRANCA REDONDA BAIXA CHEIA) #1#) CL-USER 8 > (setf *print-circle* nil) NIL CL-USER 9 > (let ((foo '(BRANCA REDONDA BAIXA CHEIA))) (list foo foo)) ((BRANCA REDONDA BAIXA CHEIA) (BRANCA REDONDA ...


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I know this is an old question, but still, there's an alternate, so it might help someone. When you're writing your compressed file to output, you probably have some integer keeping track of where you are in the current byte (for bit shifting). char c, p; p = '\0'; int curr = 7; while (infile.get(c)) { std::string trav = GetTraversal(c); for (int i ...


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When you've got arbitrary binary data, never ever try to convert it to a string as if it's actually text data which has been encoded into binary data using a normal encoding such as UTF-8. (Even when you do have text data, always specify the encoding when calling the String constructor or getBytes().) Otherwise it's like trying to load an mp3 into an image ...


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Look up "sparse array". If access speed is important, a good solution is a hash table of indices. You should allocate about 2x the space, requiring a 180 GB table. The access time would be O(1). You could have just a 90 GB table and do a binary search for an index. The access time would be O(log n), if you're happy with that speed. You can pack the ...


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It depends on many things : Response time required Is data computation heavy or are you generating data Where is data stored Most probably your data will be stored somewhere and I assume you have map-reduced it. You can provide this data to your clients using pagination.



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