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5

You state that you're only saving 0s and 1s in your text file. Thus, at binary level, your file consists entirely of occurrences of the bit sequences 00110000 and 00110001 (which correspond to the ASCII values for the characters '0' and '1'). This is hugely wasteful, and a good compression algorithm would realize that it can represent each of these 8-bit ...


3

The fundamental problem that you have is that compression algorithms operate on binary data rather than text. If you compress something, then expect some of the compressed bytes to be zero. Thus the compressed data cannot be stored in a null-terminated string. You need to change your mindset to work with binary data. To compress do the following: Convert ...


2

I do get an error with pngcheck: "zlib: inflate error = -3 (data error)". As your PNG scaffolding structure looks okay, it's time to take a low-level look into the IDAT block with a hex viewer. (I'm going to type this up while working through it.) The header looks alright; IDAT length is okay. Your zlib flags are 78 01 ("No/low compression", see also What ...


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There's two separate issues going on here: compression and minification. Compression is the process by which the server compresses content (html,css,js) to send to the client (Browser). The browser then de-compresses the content back to exactly what it was before it got compressed. By the time you get to view-source or look at the developer tools in your ...


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If you want to compress or decompress in C#, there are a lot of commercial or free libraries as well. Or you can use the built-in classes in System.IO.Compression namespace.


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The zip format has a stored method (method 0) that would allow you to simply enclose the file in the appropriate headers. See the PKWare appnote.txt for a description of the format. You would need to calculate the CRC-32 of the data to include in the headers.


1

The main data-structure used for searching is the inverted list. Fortunately, you don't need to implement it yourself. Lucene is a widely used search tool which works with inverted lists internally. Using Lucene you can create a document with multiple fields. The idea is that some of these fields will be searchable with standard keyword-type queries. I've ...


1

If you are sending large chunks of text data over the internet using HTTP protocol, then there are already some technologies in place to help you. One is called HTTP Compression. HTTP protocol specifications allow few compression algorithms to perform on data being sent, but that requires the server and client to be properly configured for compression. ...


1

#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> char* func(char *str, int *length) { int i; *length=9;//Put string length you calculated str=(char*)malloc(*length*sizeof(char)); for(i=0;i<5;i++) str[i]=i+65; str[5]=0; str[6]=65; str[7]=67; str[8]=0; return ...


1

The function returns "entire string". It is printf that outputs it until the null character will be encountered. You could define the function the following way char * compressor( const char* source, size_t *result_len ); To understand the problem consider the following code #include <stdio.h> char * compressor( const char* source, size_t ...


1

The byte 0x00 or 0x80, depending on if it is a middle or the last block. Change the 0x80 to 0x01 and all will be well. The 0x80 is appearing as a stored block that is not the last block. All that's being looked at is the low bit, which is zero, indicating a middle block. All of the data is in that "middle" block, so a decoder will recover the ...


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The maximum compression ratio of LZ4 is 255, so a guaranteed over-estimation of decompressed data size is 255 times input size. That's obviously too much to be really useful, hence the reason why there is no "reverse LZ4_compressBound()" function available. I'm afraid there is no other way than to save, or know, the uncompressed size. The LZ4 "raw" ...



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