Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

You can use zcat to stream the uncompressed contents into grep or whatever filter you want, without incurring space overhead. E.g. zcat bigfile.gz | grep PATTERN_I_NEED > much_smaller_sample Also, if it's just grep you're streaming to, you can use zgrep e.g. zgrep PATTERN_I_NEED bigfile.gz > much_smaller_sample but zgrep doesn't support 100% of ...


2

Decompression takes place in chunks, and you don't need to hold all of the decompressed data in memory to get to a specific line. You can combine the gzip module with the csv module and process the file row by row: import gzip import csv with gzip.open('googlebooks-eng-all-3gram-20120701-th.gz', 'rb') as fobj: reader = csv.reader(fobj, delimiter='\t') ...


2

There is no C++ standard library element for doing this. You must either use a special library, use an external application or develop your own text compressor. I guess the closest you get to using a "standard" library is to use the Boost libraries. I just found this question and think that Boost may have support for gzip.


1

I would: Break up the data into several thousand segments, grouped by time. I don't know the spread of times, but perhaps a file for each hour. Store them in subdirectories by timestamp. E.g. 2014/07/02/04. Put the starting time stamp in the file name. E.g. 2014-07-02 04:04:23.806.gz. For all lines, store the type as an index in the first byte. This ...


1

PNG is inherently lossless. If the destination can accept it, use a JPEG instead. If not, you could try to decimate the image yourself, and then losslessly compress it with PNG. You can also try the PNG-8 mode to compress to a palette of 256 or fewer colors (which might require a lossy step), which should result in a smaller file.


1

The inner ZipOutputStream should call finish() instead of close() as finish() flushes all compressed data, but does not close the outer zip. Mind to test the erroneousness of close() one would need to add yet another file, as the inner zip is last. Path sourcePath = Paths.get("C:/D/test.html"); try (ZipOutputStream zipOut = new ZipOutputStream( ...


1

Use libtar, a tar file manipulator.


1

I believe your setup, using the compression module, is correct. I just don't think it compresses the files during development. Try setting the NODE_ENV to "production", e.g. $ NODE_ENV="production" $ node server.js EDIT To your follow up question. Essentially what you are seeing in Chrome Dev Tools is the result of the compressed gzip compression. This ...


1

The number is for keeping track of the relative order of frames, for cases with reordering (such as with B-frames). It's resetting because it's only a few bits long, so in your case, after 15 it wraps around to 0. Since the receiver knows how many bits it is, it can also know that 0 is the next frame after 15, and given a short window of frames, e.g. 13, 14, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible