Hot answers tagged

2

You can use a ByteArrayOutputStream to write bytes to a byte array: ByteArrayOutputStream out = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); ImageIO.write(image, "png", out); byte[] bytes = out.toByteArray(); After you have done the above, bytes will then hold the data that the image contains. Notice: a ByteArrayOutputStream is a special input kind of OutputStream, you ...


1

A 100-250 byte string sounds realy short to compress. I think the most algorithms will raise the size. A better idea would be to pack some of these strings together and then compress them. If it is large enough you get a size benefit. There are many compression libraries out there, regardless which language you use. Another trick would be to use a "binary" ...


1

Sorry this isn't a comment, but I don't have enough reputation to comment yet. Is it possible that an exception is being raised and not handled? Per the documentation (https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh485721(v=vs.110).aspx/), what you are doing should work. But it has the extra caveat as listed below: If a file in the directory cannot be ...


1

zlib itself will need a relatively trivial amount of memory, up to 256kb per thread. This will be dominated by the memory you use to store your input and output, if you are keeping those in memory. For details, see the zlib web site (Look for the "Memory Footprint" topic).


1

One technique that the HDF5 people use is "shuffling", where you group each byte for N floating point values together. This is more likely to give you repetitive sequences of bytes which will compress better with gzip, for example. A second method I have found which greatly reduces the size of compressed gzipped data is to first convert the data to the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible