New answers tagged

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To assure that you can start decompression at some point with no history, you must either use Z_FULL_FLUSH or simply end the stream and start a new one. For the former you could do a Z_SYNC_FLUSH followed by a Z_FULL_FLUSH in order to insert two markers resulting in the nine bytes 00 00 ff ff 00 00 00 ff ff, which would be unlikely to be seen randomly in ...


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Well I finally managed to fully crack it. It was indeed using an implementation of LZ77 and Huffman coding, but very much a non-standard DEFLATE-like method for storing and deriving the codes. As it turns out the pre-header codes were themselves fixed-dictionary Huffman codes and not literal bit lengths. The extra "0" following the "111"'s turned out to be ...


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Perhaps the answer is late,but ... You can do it in compressed domain steganography.Read image as binary file and analysis this file with libs like JPEG Parser. Based on your selected algorithm, find location of venues and compute new value of this venue and replace result bits in file data. Finally write file in same input extension. I hope I helped.


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Unfortunately I don't know exactly what '7zip library' means, and what is your Android device architecture. Assuming '7zip library' is what compiles when building p7zip command-line utilities, and your Android device can run 64-bit Intel executables, I got good news for you. I have successfully built and tested 7z executable and libraries it depends on for ...


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I managed to find a way to do this thanks to @stuartd. He pointed me to this answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/22339337/3182972 and I found a way to implement it into my code that creates directories with files inside them from a source location of said directories. Here is the code: using (FileStream zipToOpen = new FileStream("c:\MyDestination\test....


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I think that you can encode bytes such as 0, 1, 2, 3, 255… etc. (Where lots of 0 and 1) Let's encode this bit sequence: 000000011111110 1. Shift bits and increment the counter if bit compare to last bit 2. If NOT— shift 111 to output buffer and write control bit 1 before bit sequence 3. If bits can not be packed — write 0 bit and rest of data Output: ...


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The intuition behind the result is that the conditional entropy of Y_pred given X_train is zero. So M2 can learn X_train-> Y_pred more easily than in second case.


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There is not one solution that perfectly fits all... BZ2 is based on the principle that "colours" (or gray values, but I will use "colours" in this explanation) which frequently occur in the image are encoded with less bits than colours which are rare. Thus, as a rule of thumb: the bigger the image the better the compression ratio. JPEG is a different ...


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If you want to compress a DICOM dataset with images, recommendation is to use one of the compression types supported by DICOM Standard. This includes lossy and lossless JPEG, JPEG 2000, JPEG-LS, and RLE to name a few. Standard also supports encoding extended grayscale (12-16 bit grayscale) using the standard based compression techniques. The Transfer ...


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You just need to create an Image instance, and set it's src to your data url. Then pass it to JIC: var img = new Image(); img.src = $scope.image_source; jic.compress(img,...) It then just uses a canvas element to manipulate the image, generate a new data url, and creates a new Image instance, setting its src to the data url. So when you get the compressed ...


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Short Version: PNG and other image compression algorithms are designed to compress images containing 2D patterns, something binary files are unlikely to contain when encoded as an image and as a result would be unlikely to compete with more appropriate compression techniques. Long Version: Data compression works by taking advantage of expected patterns in ...


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See also my answer here import org.apache.commons.compress.archivers.ArchiveEntry; import org.apache.commons.compress.archivers.tar.TarArchiveEntry; import org.apache.commons.compress.archivers.tar.TarArchiveInputStream; import org.apache.commons.compress.archivers.tar.TarArchiveOutputStream; public class TarUpdater { private static final int ...


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I have produced following code to solve this problem. This code checks if any of files to be incorporated already exist in tar file and updates that entry. Later if it doesn't exist append to the end of archive. import org.apache.commons.compress.archivers.ArchiveEntry; import org.apache.commons.compress.archivers.tar....


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The extra field itself has an internal format that you are required to adhere to. From the PKWare appnote: 4.5.1 In order to allow different programs and different types of information to be stored in the 'extra' field in .ZIP files, the following structure MUST be used for all programs storing data in this field: header1+data1 + header2+...


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In my opinion, the CPU overhead caused by compression on very small files is close to zero. So, I don't think it's worth doing a test on the file size. The most worrying aspect in your description is actually that you apparently have many small requests over HTTPS. If it's not already the case, I would recommend to enable SSL session caching in order to ...


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String holds Unicode symbols, called code points, and char has 2 bytes and is in UTF-16, a special format. Especially there are surrogate pairs of 2 chars to represent code points above the 2 byte range, above 216. Alternatively to using char you could do all in code points, which in java are of type int. However there is an upper limit to legal Unicode. ...


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There are no values that have any special meaning of "interrupting" or "ending" a Java string, array or stream. (At least, not unless you have designed your application, or used / chosen a protocol or encoding that places a special meaning of that nature on specific values. I don't imagine that you have done ... because if you had done, you would not be ...


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Majority of apache projects including spark uses parquet to achieve columnar compression for efficient storage. It is nicely explained in following video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZNjmfx4LMc


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Because you would normally use a compression program before encoding with ASCII85, which can do a much better job than the suggested ad hoc encodings.


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An gzipped archive of uncompressed files is definitely what your users will want. Since you are using Python, you can skip shelling out and make things a bit cleaner (IMO). It uses tarfile and gzip.GzipFile to handle the archival and compression parts. Editorial Note: while writing this I stumbled across an interesting bug that you might want to be aware ...


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A gzipped tar archive is not an archive of compressed files. It is a compressed archive of files. In contrast, a zip archive is an archive of compressed files. An archive of compressed files is a better archive format, if you want to be able to extract (or update) individual files. But it is an inferior compression technique; unless the component files are ...


2

Given your definition ... it is a list of smallest-k values for which 10^k = 1 mod p for primes p > 5 ... am I wrong to believe that your values are of the form (p - 1) / x where x is an integer significantly smaller than p? For instance, for p < 50, we have: p = 7 : 10^6 = 1 (mod 7) => k = 6 = (p - 1) / 1 => x = 1 p = 11 : 10^2 = 1 (mod ...


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The best text compression available offers a (roughly) 12-17% compression ratio (62.4-90 kB) so you're not going to meet your threshold. Your data are random, as well, which generally makes compression algorithms perform worse. Look at an alternative approach, such as making your RNG process faster, or if you don't need a full list (just some integers), ...


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In short, no. log(2, 999982) ~= 20 So the largest number would take 20 bits to store. Let's say that on average, each number takes 10 bits to store (evenly distributed between 0 and the max). ~80,000 numbers * 10 bits per number = 800,000 bits = 100,000 bytes So these numbers, stored as efficiently as possible, would take ~100KB of space. Compression ...


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Have you tried using RAD Video Tools and Scaleform? Game makers usually face the same problem with almost same frame. Try these :D


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Calling .toString on Array[Byte] is actually returning something like [B@4d2f7117 (the standard toString implementation). It's not doing what you are expecting which is... val encrypted = encrypt(new String(zipped)) instead of val encrypted = encrypt(zipped.toString)


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You can't. 3610 is much less than 1019 (or 1018, which is it?), so it is not possible to represent all 19 or 18-digit numbers in base 10 with 10-digit numbers in base 36.


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What you want to do is more complicated than you think. However the code has already been written. Look at gzlog.h and gzlog.c in the examples directory of the zlib distribution.


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Common compression algorithms (for instance lz4) are very efficient when you have repeating data patterns and are made exactly for that use case. I would use lz4 or lz7 or something else on that line.


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I know this is an old answer, but it feels like there is an insufficient answer with regards to what compression algorithm the asker should use, hence this answer. If I were you I would use an existing library such as zlib, which has been implemented in multiple languages. Using this library you can decide if you want to use the deflate algorithm or the ...


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The index.codec setting is a node level setting and it won't be visible in the list of settings for a new index. If the index template is specifically setting the codec then that one will be used, otherwise the one at node level will be. Also, when changing the codec for an index, only the new segments (after new indexing, changes to existent documents or ...


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i would rather use nginx to deal with compression in production. In case you still want to use node, check out http://npmjs.com/package/compression Copy paste from the readme. var compression = require('compression') var express = require('express') var app = express() app.use(compression())


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This is a shot in the dark. You may know this, but here is the base anything to base 10 conversion formula. Lets say you have a number 45678 for my simplicity reasons. Start with the value of the digit on the right. Add it to the digit to it's left * base, increasing with the base power: 8+(7*36)+(6*36*36)+(5*36*36*36)+(4*36*36*36*36) = 6959780 base 10 Of ...


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Ok, after testing with a sample database, here's what I found. The important thing is that setting a table's compression to "None" causes SSMS to generate a script like the following: USE [MyDatabase] ALTER TABLE [dbo].[MyTable] REBUILD PARTITION = ALL WITH (DATA_COMPRESSION = NONE) In particular, note the "alter table MyTable rebuild." If the table has ...


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zip -r article.zip article will include article/ in every path name in the zip archive. So when you unzip, you unzip to the article/ directory, no matter what you name the .zip file. The name of the .zip file has no bearing whatsoever on what the result of the unzipping is named. To get rid of the directory name, you would need to do the zip operation from ...


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I ended up doing the following: public URL createTarGzip() throws IOException { Path inputDirectoryPath = ... File outputFile = new File("/path/to/filename.tar.gz"); try (FileOutputStream fileOutputStream = new FileOutputStream(outputFile); BufferedOutputStream bufferedOutputStream = new BufferedOutputStream(fileOutputStream); ...


0

Here the func for unpack gzip file to destination file: func UnpackGzipFile(gzFilePath, dstFilePath string) (int64, error) { gzFile, err := os.Open(gzFilePath) if err != nil { return 0, fmt.Errorf("Failed to open file %s for unpack: %s", gzFilePath, err) } dstFile, err := os.OpenFile(dstFilePath, os.O_CREATE|os.O_WRONLY|os.O_APPEND, ...


1

The problem is that your string is much too short to fill the DEFLATE working buffer. And because your stream is not explicitly closed, it doesn't get processed at all, nor flushed. Your data is still pending in the buffer when stream_get_contents() is called. If we force a buffer flush by injecting a large enough block of random bytes, some data gets ...


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The latest version of lrzip (0.630) does do recursion.


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I went inside the folder and zipped . and this is what changed the default extraction path to the filename, and moved the zip file one level above. cd /resources/html/article && $(which zip) -rp article . && mv article.zip ../article.zip Shortened my command (got rid of mv) cd /resources/html/article && $(which zip) -rp ../...


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No, it doesn't. Compression Type = NONE simply means rebuilding of the indexes in the table without applying any compression. So, it won't change the Figure. Next time you open the Compression wizard for the table, it will show the same numbers after clicking on "Calculate". https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190273.aspx https://msdn.microsoft.com/...


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In order to split a file into pieces for processing, you need two things: The pieces need to be able to be processed independently. You need to be able to find where to split the pieces. The deflate format in its normal usage supports neither. For 1: the deflate format is inherently serial, with every match referring to previously uncompressed data, ...


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The default save quality for jpg in Pillow is 75. I bet your original image is saved with a higher quality setting. The image quality, on a scale from 1 (worst) to 95 (best). The default is 75. Values above 95 should be avoided; 100 disables portions of the JPEG compression algorithm, and results in large files with hardly any gain in image quality....


2

The easiest way to reduce your cost would be to: store the photos in Firebase Storage use a similar path in both case for user-specific data, i.e. /users/<uid>/name in the database vs /users/<uid>/pic1.jpg in storage store the URL of the photo in the Firebase Database, i.e. /users/<uid>/profilePictureUrl: "https://storagedownloadURL/users/...


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TurboPFor: Fastest Integer Compression for C/C++ including Java Critical Natives Interface Scalar + Integrated (SIMD) differential/Zigzag encoding/decoding for sorted/unsorted integer lists Full range 16/32/64 bits interger lists Direct access


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Encode the information in binary, the convert that to allowed filename characters using Base64 or something similar. Let's say you have 3 bits for the color, 27 bits for the size, 17 bits for start, 17 bits for end, 8 bits for each of the three parameters (just making this up as I go along), and 32 bits for the timestamp. That's 120 bits total. Using Base64,...


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An MSI file is a "sparse" file, not a continuous stream of data. Just the order in which a tool builds an MSI file can result in different sizes.


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Have you tried using the requests library? I believe it provides an abstraction over urllib. The following solution should work for you, but it uses the requests library instead of urllib (but requests > urllib anyway!). Let me know if you prefer to continue using urllib. import os import requests def download(url, chunk_s=1024, fname=None): if not ...


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Assuming you need to download a big file, it is better to use the "write and binary" mode when writing content to a file in python. You may also try to use the python requests module more than the urllib module: Please see below a working code: import requests url="http://www.google.com" with open("myoutputfile.ext","wb") as f: f.write( requests.get(...


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Depends on what you want to do. It seems like you want to read an XZ file so I would assume you need to setup the input codec not the output one. I'm not a PIG user but from what I gather it cannot easily handle custom compression (unlike Hive and Streaming for example).



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