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0

Solution using std::string: #include <string> #include <iostream> #include <iterator> std::string compressor(char* str) { char *compressed_string; int len; // this is the size of the compressed data //... // compress the data and assume that len has the number of characters //... std::string theString(compressed_string, ...


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#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> char* func(char *str, int *length) { int i; *length=9;//Put string length you calculated str=(char*)malloc(*length*sizeof(char)); for(i=0;i<5;i++) str[i]=i+65; str[5]=0; str[6]=65; str[7]=67; str[8]=0; return ...


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The function returns "entire string". It is printf that outputs it until the null character will be encountered. You could define the function the following way char * compressor( const char* source, size_t *result_len ); To understand the problem consider the following code #include <stdio.h> char * compressor( const char* source, size_t ...


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If you want to compress or decompress in C#, there are a lot of commercial or free libraries as well. Or you can use the built-in classes in System.IO.Compression namespace.


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You state that you're only saving 0s and 1s in your text file. Thus, at binary level, your file consists entirely of occurrences of the bit sequences 00110000 and 00110001 (which correspond to the ASCII values for the characters '0' and '1'). This is hugely wasteful, and a good compression algorithm would realize that it can represent each of these 8-bit ...


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The zip format has a stored method (method 0) that would allow you to simply enclose the file in the appropriate headers. See the PKWare appnote.txt for a description of the format. You would need to calculate the CRC-32 of the data to include in the headers.


0

That's not really how video compression is going to work. If you want higher quality, you get larger file sizes. If you want smaller file sizes, you get lower quality. Modern codecs like MP5 and VP9 are about as good as it gets. TinyPNG and JPEGmini are largely just efforts to make sure that the formats are using the maximum amount of compression available ...


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Those sorts of combinations are done routinely. You should read some books on compression. LZ77 is a more general form of RLE that copies repeats of previous strings. (A match of distance one and length n codes a run of n copies of the last bytes.) LZ77 is normally followed by Huffman, Arithmetic, or Range coding. Huffman should follow LZ77 or RLE, not ...


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The main data-structure used for searching is the inverted list. Fortunately, you don't need to implement it yourself. Lucene is a widely used search tool which works with inverted lists internally. Using Lucene you can create a document with multiple fields. The idea is that some of these fields will be searchable with standard keyword-type queries. I've ...


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There's two separate issues going on here: compression and minification. Compression is the process by which the server compresses content (html,css,js) to send to the client (Browser). The browser then de-compresses the content back to exactly what it was before it got compressed. By the time you get to view-source or look at the developer tools in your ...


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Yes, it's possible as a sequence of steps: Convert the string to binary form, e.g. using UTF-8 Compress the binary data Encode the binary data back as text, e.g. using base64. Do not try to "decode" it using a text encoding like base64; the result of compression is not normal encoded text. However, unless your text is easily-compressible, the size ...


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Just for reference, n bytes of LZ4 compressed data can represent up to 24 + 255(n - 10) uncompressed bytes, which is the case of a run of that many bytes. n must be at least ten to make a valid stream that includes a literal, a match, and then five literals at the end per the specification. So the decompress bound function could be something like (n ...


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The byte 0x00 or 0x80, depending on if it is a middle or the last block. Change the 0x80 to 0x01 and all will be well. The 0x80 is appearing as a stored block that is not the last block. All that's being looked at is the low bit, which is zero, indicating a middle block. All of the data is in that "middle" block, so a decoder will recover the ...


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I do get an error with pngcheck: "zlib: inflate error = -3 (data error)". As your PNG scaffolding structure looks okay, it's time to take a low-level look into the IDAT block with a hex viewer. (I'm going to type this up while working through it.) The header looks alright; IDAT length is okay. Your zlib flags are 78 01 ("No/low compression", see also What ...


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The maximum compression ratio of LZ4 is 255, so a guaranteed over-estimation of decompressed data size is 255 times input size. That's obviously too much to be really useful, hence the reason why there is no "reverse LZ4_compressBound()" function available. I'm afraid there is no other way than to save, or know, the uncompressed size. The LZ4 "raw" ...


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It doesn't appear there's any way to set a minimum file size in mod_deflate (http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.0/mod/mod_deflate.html) However you can skip compressing images as it won't actually do compression.


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Another approach is to use Object Oriented Programming (OPP). You can implement a very simple class that will save you a lot of work after. class Movie: def __init__(self, title, genre, year): self.title = title self.genre = genre self.year = year def filter(self, filter_): """ filter_ here is a dict.""" ...


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something like this: movies = [ [["t", "transformers"],["g", "animation"],["d", "2005"]], [["t", "ted"],["g", "comedy"],["d", "2008"]], [["t", "starwars"],["g", "action"],["d", "2000"]] ] fil = [["g", "animation"], ["d", "2005"]] print [i[0][1] for i in movies if fil[0] in i and fil[1] in i] this will print: ['transformers']


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First step, restructure in dicts (I renamed filter to filtr, since filter is a built-in function): movies = [dict(item) for item in movies] filtr = dict(filtr) Then, filter according to your criterion: filtered = [item for item in movies if all(item[k] == v for k,v in filtr.iteritems())] Here, you loop on all movies, and you look for those that match ...


0

Trying to compress a PDF I made with 400ppi tiffs, mostly 8-bit, a few 24-bit, with PackBits compression, using tiff2pdf compressed with Zip/Deflate. One problem I had with every one of these methods: none of the above methods preserved the bookmarks TOC that I painstakingly manually created in Acrobat Pro X. Not even the recommended ebook setting for gs. ...


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This is not a complete solution. Since you have to store both the sequence and the lookup table, maybe you can greedily pick symbols that minimize the storage cost. Step 1: Store all the symbols of length at most k in a try and keep track of their counts Step 2: For each probable symbol, calculate the space saved (or compression ratio). ...


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As long as you tokenize the text properly you don't have to worry about the overlap problem. You can define each token to be a word (longest continuous stream of characters), punctuation symbol or a whitespace character (' ', '\t', \n'). Thus by definition the tokens/symbols do not overlap. But using Huffman coding directly isn't ideal for compressing text ...


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"DEFLATE INFLATE" is a very short string, and so will be encoded using the fixed Huffman codes. A disassembly of the compressed data gives: last fixed literal 'DEFLATE IN match 5 8 end which means a single fixed block which is the last block, the literal bytes "DEFLATE IN", and a string match eight bytes back for five bytes, which copies "FLATE". The ...


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As in wikipedia: A Deflate stream consists of a series of blocks. Each block is preceded by a 3-bit header, the meaning of the bits are: First bit: Last-block-in-stream marker: 1: this is the last block in the stream. 0: there are more blocks to process after this one. Second and third bits: Encoding method used for this block type: 00: a ...


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gzip 1.6 (June 2013) added the -k, --keep option, so now you can: find . -type f -name "*cache.html" -exec gzip -k {} \; gzip -k *cache.html or for all files recursively simply: gzip -kr . Found at: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/46786/how-to-tell-gzip-to-keep-original-file


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You can actually read from the MemoryStream without closing the compressor: input.CopyTo(compressor); compressStream.Position = 0; var mem2 = new BinaryReader(compressStream); mem2.Read(buf, 0, 10000000); will yield the contents of the compressStream. Just be careful to position to the end before the next write! (and of course, you have to keep your ...


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I faced a similar problem. I was trying to send a large file (~ 709 MB) over local network in chunks of 8192 bytes. I used Lz4 compression/decompression to reduce the network bandwidth. So assuming you are trying to do something similar, here's my suggestion : Here's the snippet of similar regular example you'll find on https://github.com/jpountz/lz4-java ...


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Your code has implemented 'using' which disposes all objects when the method returns. As such you cannot maintain 'state' between different calls. Try maintaining references to compressor and compressStream outside of the method.


0

Is the compression adding something like a css reset at the end instead of the beginning? That would cause you to lose a lot. Try compressing your stylesheet at CSS Minify. Also, isn't YUI Compressor for js? That might be the problem. And just to cover all bases: Compression naturally makes your stylesheet smaller and removes all comments. Add /*! to the ...


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Changing the mime-type is really not nice. See this post instead on how to implement a custom httpmodule which does the gzipping for you in a few lines of code. http://laubplusco.net/gzip-svg-files-asp-net/


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this is from the dev guide byte[] originalBytes = ... Deflater deflater = new Deflater(); deflater.setInput(originalBytes); deflater.finish(); ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); byte[] buf = new byte[8192]; while (!deflater.finished()) { int byteCount = deflater.deflate(buf); baos.write(buf, 0, byteCount); } ...


0

Here is the sample code from Deflator documentation which does exactly what you probably need: Deflater deflater = new Deflater(Deflater.BEST_COMPRESSION); deflater.setInput(originalBytes); deflater.finish(); ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); byte[] buf = new byte[8192]; while (!deflater.finished()) { int byteCount = ...


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To ensure proper interoperability you need to specify two mime types for JavaScript: application/javascript text/javascript There's one more, but afaict it was only used in the transition period: application/x-javascript


0

If you'd like to temporarily disable the cache without using debug mode, place these settings at the end of config.php: // disable server caching $min_cachePath = null; // prevent client caching $min_serveOptions['maxAge'] = 0; $min_serveOptions['lastModifiedTime'] = $_SERVER['REQUEST_TIME'];


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@Blazemonger's point about compression algorithms costing more than transmitting the whitespace is not very accurate because, knowing Google, they've probably hard-coded that whitespace anyway (i.e., it's not generated by humans or even a specific generator for CSS, just a fixed string). Now, there's a few things to consider: It's easier to developers to ...


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I like to keep the original files and also create uglified ones: uglify: { dist: { files: [{ expand: true, src: '**/*.js', dest: 'destdir', cwd: 'srcdir', rename: function(dest, src) { return dest + '/' + src.replace('.js', '.min.js'); } }] } },


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Web Essentials is best program for that, I really like it, and it has a lot of other nice features: http://vswebessentials.com/


0

I had a slightly similar problem before, too long ago to remember in detail. I think I resorted to making the changes directly to the ApplicationHost.config (%windir%\system32\inetsrv\config), but not an ideal solution. Assume you've looked here http://www.iis.net/configreference/system.webserver/httpcompression - Have you tried using the clear element as ...


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Ok, thanks to DotNetZip I am able to do what I want in a very resource efficient way: using System.IO; using Ionic.Zip; class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { byte[] buffer; using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream()) { using (var zip = new ZipFile(@"C:\temp\MylargeZipFile.zip")) { // The file on which to ...


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How do you safely shorten repeating characters that Smaz doesn't compress by itself? You can't without changing the Smaz algorithm and being incompatible with Smaz. Smaz is purpose built to be effective on small strings because its dictionary is universal and pre-computed. Other compression schemes need to build up a dictionary that is data set dependent, ...


0

Gzip is an algorithm that compresses a string of data. It knows nothing about files or folders and so can't do what you want by itself. What you can do is use an archiver tool to build a single archive file, and then use gzip to compress the data that makes up the archive: https://github.com/npm/tar-stream Also see this answer for more information: ...


1

There are two approaches for doing this: Static Compression Dynamic Compression Compression in IIS 7.x is configured with two .config file elements in the space. The elements can be set anywhere in the IIS/ASP.NET configuration pipeline all the way from ApplicationHost.config down to the local web.config file. The following is from the the default ...


0

The only way to assure that you can compress by a factor of two is to throw away about half of the 300 characters. If you can limit the number of possible characters, then you can compress by a factor of log(n)/log(256), where n is the that number. E.g., if you can limit it to 85 characters, i.e. 52 alpha, ten numeric, and 23 special characters (including ...


0

These persmissions are required to store data to your device storage. Mainfest.xml file <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.WRITE_INTERNAL_STORAGE" /> <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE"/> Zip Function public void zip(String[] _files, String zipFileName) { try { ...


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You may also try JSZip. To run it in browser you just have to download and include dist/jszip.js or dist/jszip.min.js. This is actively supported and supports a wide variety of browsers including everyone's favorite IE6/7/8! Usage (from their docs): var zip = new JSZip(); zip.file("Hello.txt", "Hello World\n"); var img = zip.folder("images"); ...


0

But when I compress this file my ratio is very poor because the high randomness of the data. Compression ratio is a red herring here. You should instead be comparing the compressed file sizes. In theory, there should be no difference in the compressed file sizes, since it's the same data. Uncompressed, the bits-as-bytes file would be 8 times larger. ...


0

If you want to keep same screen size, you can consider using crf factor: https://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/Encode/H.264 Here is the command which works for me: (on mac you need to add -strict -2 to be able to use aac audio codec. ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -c:v libx264 -crf 24 -b:v 1M -c:a aac output.mp4


2

Don't use a string but a binary value. The POSIX Timestamp (EPOCH) is stored in a 32-bit value (at least on a 32-bit PC). Storing your timestamp on a string can take 9x8bit=72bits or up to 9x32bits=288bits if a the char type uses a 32-bit memory slot. Your solution is to get the binary form of your string. Here what you will get in binary: Binary ...


0

If you are sure that your system doesn't reach the date Wed, 18 May 2033 03:33:20 GMT (equals 2000000000) you could omit the first digit (which is a 1 for the next ~20 years) on every timestamp entry that you store. if you want to retrive a timestamp you just need to remember to add back this digit.


0

Try this... $yourtstring="<div>\r\n <span>1</span>\r\n \r\n \r\n \r\n <a href=\"?p=2\">2</a>\r\n <a href=\"?p=3\">3</a>\r\n <a href=\"?p=4\">4</a>\r\n <span>...</span>\r\n \r\n <a href=\"?p=64\">64</a>\r\n <a href=\"?p=2\">Next</a>\r\n </div>\r\n"; $answer = ...



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