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0

@Blazemonger's point about compression algorithms costing more than transmitting the whitespace is not very accurate because, knowing Google, they've probably hard-coded that whitespace anyway (i.e., it's not generated by humans or even a specific generator for CSS, just a fixed string). Now, there's a few things to consider: It's easier to developers to ...


0

I like to keep the original files and also create uglified ones: uglify: { dist: { files: [{ expand: true, src: '**/*.js', dest: 'destdir', cwd: 'srcdir', rename: function(dest, src) { return dest + '/' + src.replace('.js', '.min.js'); } }] } },


0

Web Essentials is best program for that, I really like it, and it has a lot of other nice features: http://vswebessentials.com/


0

I had a slightly similar problem before, too long ago to remember in detail. I think I resorted to making the changes directly to the ApplicationHost.config (%windir%\system32\inetsrv\config), but not an ideal solution. Assume you've looked here http://www.iis.net/configreference/system.webserver/httpcompression - Have you tried using the clear element as ...


0

Ok, thanks to DotNetZip I am able to do what I want in a very resource efficient way: using System.IO; using Ionic.Zip; class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { byte[] buffer; using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream()) { using (var zip = new ZipFile(@"C:\temp\MylargeZipFile.zip")) { // The file on which to ...


-1

How do you safely shorten repeating characters that Smaz doesn't compress by itself? You can't without changing the Smaz algorithm and being incompatible with Smaz. Smaz is purpose built to be effective on small strings because its dictionary is universal and pre-computed. Other compression schemes need to build up a dictionary that is data set dependent, ...


0

Gzip is an algorithm that compresses a string of data. It knows nothing about files or folders and so can't do what you want by itself. What you can do is use an archiver tool to build a single archive file, and then use gzip to compress the data that makes up the archive: https://github.com/npm/tar-stream Also see this answer for more information: ...


1

There are two approaches for doing this: Static Compression Dynamic Compression Compression in IIS 7.x is configured with two .config file elements in the space. The elements can be set anywhere in the IIS/ASP.NET configuration pipeline all the way from ApplicationHost.config down to the local web.config file. The following is from the the default ...


0

The only way to assure that you can compress by a factor of two is to throw away about half of the 300 characters. If you can limit the number of possible characters, then you can compress by a factor of log(n)/log(256), where n is the that number. E.g., if you can limit it to 85 characters, i.e. 52 alpha, ten numeric, and 23 special characters (including ...


0

These persmissions are required to store data to your device storage. Mainfest.xml file <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.WRITE_INTERNAL_STORAGE" /> <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE"/> Zip Function public void zip(String[] _files, String zipFileName) { try { ...


0

You may also try JSZip. To run it in browser you just have to download and include dist/jszip.js or dist/jszip.min.js. This is actively supported and supports a wide variety of browsers including everyone's favorite IE6/7/8! Usage (from their docs): var zip = new JSZip(); zip.file("Hello.txt", "Hello World\n"); var img = zip.folder("images"); ...


0

But when I compress this file my ratio is very poor because the high randomness of the data. Compression ratio is a red herring here. You should instead be comparing the compressed file sizes. In theory, there should be no difference in the compressed file sizes, since it's the same data. Uncompressed, the bits-as-bytes file would be 8 times larger. ...


0

If you want to keep same screen size, you can consider using crf factor: https://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/Encode/H.264 Here is the command which works for me: (on mac you need to add -strict -2 to be able to use aac audio codec. ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -c:v libx264 -crf 24 -b:v 1M -c:a aac output.mp4


2

Don't use a string but a binary value. The POSIX Timestamp (EPOCH) is stored in a 32-bit value (at least on a 32-bit PC). Storing your timestamp on a string can take 9x8bit=72bits or up to 9x32bits=288bits if a the char type uses a 32-bit memory slot. Your solution is to get the binary form of your string. Here what you will get in binary: Binary ...


0

If you are sure that your system doesn't reach the date Wed, 18 May 2033 03:33:20 GMT (equals 2000000000) you could omit the first digit (which is a 1 for the next ~20 years) on every timestamp entry that you store. if you want to retrive a timestamp you just need to remember to add back this digit.


0

Try this... $yourtstring="<div>\r\n <span>1</span>\r\n \r\n \r\n \r\n <a href=\"?p=2\">2</a>\r\n <a href=\"?p=3\">3</a>\r\n <a href=\"?p=4\">4</a>\r\n <span>...</span>\r\n \r\n <a href=\"?p=64\">64</a>\r\n <a href=\"?p=2\">Next</a>\r\n </div>\r\n"; $answer = ...


0

You can use strip_tags $str = "<div>\r\n <span>1</span>\r\n \r\n \r\n \r\n <a href=\"?p=2\">2</a>\r\n <a href=\"?p=3\">3</a>\r\n <a href=\"?p=4\">4</a>\r\n <span>...</span>\r\n \r\n <a href=\"?p=64\">64</a>\r\n <a href=\"?p=2\">Next</a>\r\n </div>\r\n"; $str = ...


1

Yes, you can compress PHP output this way, but web-servers (nginx, Apache) can do such compressing more effective for all type of content (css assets, etc), not only PHP output :) Yes, you can set zlib.output_compression to numeric value http://php.net/manual/en/zlib.configuration.php#ini.zlib.output-compression This option also accepts integer values ...


0

Well you cant, as far as C/C++ is concerned in socket programming context. It is not possible to have a datatype less than one byte.


2

You can't send single bit because in the underlying level IP protocol sends size of packet in bytes. However, you can manually pack your bits in single byte and send it. That will be more efficient.


-2

Your question just shows that you do not understand what bit and byte is. Byte is a group of 8 bits, nothing less, nothing more. You can interpret it as unsigned number 0-255, or signed number -128 - +127, as ASCII letter or as 8 separate bits. Sockets send bytes, so if you want to send bits, you will have to group them in 8 boundary, that's it. How you pack ...


4

The answer is perhaps surprising, but quite simple, and lies in the PNG format itself. As already mentioned, PNG applies a filter to each line. This helps compression for images which have a pattern within a line or between neighbouring lines. In this case, the image is pretty much single color with just a few dots sprinkled in, so using no filter yields ...


0

Your mistake comes from missing the code size increase. Here are the codes, "nextcode" values and current code size: Code read from bitstream: 100, 001, 110, 110, 0010, 1001 internal 'Next' code value: 110, 110, 110, 111, 1000, 1001 current code size: 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4 The missing logic from your decode loop is that you need to ...


2

It means exactly what is written in spec i.e. specify if is full frame or field. As for difference between frame and field you should read about interlaced video and field (video). In short field is half vertical resolution part (only odd or even lines) of full frame. And no field_pic_flag doesn't have anything todo with "intervals". For the note ...


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This problem is called partition of rectilinear polyhedron. There is a good answer on similar question biziclop posted in a comment. Idea of algorithm is to reduce problem to maximum matching of bipartite graph (vertices are possible cuts.) 3D My original problem was same topic in 3D. That version is shown to be NP-complete :-/ After some research, I ...


0

Minification a process which combines multiple CSS or JS files to a single file and perform process of compression(whitespace removal) and obfuscation(JS) is an ideal build time solution, rather than a run time solution. While using Tomcat with IIS, it will be good to have some thing like this: Use WRO4J as a maven build time plugin. Create an attribute ...


0

Check the official documentation and it addresses your issues clearly. ZipFile.write(filename, arcname=None, compress_type=None) compress should be one of the defined constants, e.g., ZIP_DEFLATED Note that you can also specifcy the conmpression type on the constructor and it will apply to all files added to the zip archive. The documentation also ...


1

To enable compression, specify compression method in the constructor: zip = zipfile.ZipFile(loczip, "w", zipfile.ZIP_DEFLATED) I think you are asking to remove the relative paths of files inside the zip file. If you really want that, you could write: zip.write(locfile, os.path.basename(locfile)) However this is probably a bad idea, since removing all ...


0

When using multiple strings like this it is possible to avoid the pointer overhead for each string (4 or 8 bytes each) by concatenating them together with \0s (1 byte) and using a lookup function. #include <stdio.h> static const char strings[]="hello\0world\0test"; char * nthstring(const char *s, unsigned n){ while(n--) while(*s++) ...


1

You can resize to image view in particular frame. using below code - (UIImage*)imageWithImage:(UIImage*)image scaledToSize:(CGSize)newSize; { UIGraphicsBeginImageContext( newSize ); [image drawInRect:CGRectMake(0,0,newSize.width,newSize.height)]; UIImage* newImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext(); ...


0

You're using a JPEG encoding quality of 1 which corresponds to 100% quality. Try using a setting of 0.2-0.8 when you perform the JPEG encoding and check the file size then.


0

In many cases in databases zlib will be better. Both zlib and gzip compress pretty well though of course the degree of compression with each will depend on your data. One difference though is that whereas gzip takes approximately the same amount of time to compress as to decompress, zlib will decompress much faster that it compresses. This makes it good ...


3

On the PostgreSQL side, you could also use an open source columnar store. This gets you compression, columnar layout, and skip indexes for free. Storage and disk I/O related benefits are: Since column values are stored sequentially, you get better compression ratios The database only reads the columns you are querying, and skips the rest cstore_fdw builds ...


0

ZIP format supports many algorithms with different compression ratios. Also the tools themselves can use proprietary algorithms (7Zip has its own algorithm, which is more efficient than the one used in regular ZIPs). So you need to check the effectiveness yourself on your files.


2

Let's separate DEFLATE, as a compression bitstream format described in https://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1951.txt from zlib, which is implementation of algorithms to encode and decode such bitstream. Then, DEFLATE certainly can represent, and compress, concatenation of 2 strings. Why zlib doesn't do that? Well, because match searching for LZ77 compression is ...


0

I solved the problem of the C drive possibly filling by changing the job to just zip the files in the same directory as the logs currently exist so that the impact of copying the folders was eliminated. Thanks to all for all help given.


1

I would: Break up the data into several thousand segments, grouped by time. I don't know the spread of times, but perhaps a file for each hour. Store them in subdirectories by timestamp. E.g. 2014/07/02/04. Put the starting time stamp in the file name. E.g. 2014-07-02 04:04:23.806.gz. For all lines, store the type as an index in the first byte. This ...


1

I wouldn't put zlib compression on within my application. I would leave it at the web server level where it is highly optimized. A lot of folks make the mistake of using their Node.js server's HTTP server as their primary serving method. This obviously works, but you can make things more efficient by putting a proper web server, such as Nginx, out in ...


-1

Definitely use a database. PostgreSQL timestamp fields are 8 bytes each. If you use smallint for TYPE and real for your data values (6 decimal place precision), that's 18 bytes per row or over 55GB for your current dataset. Without indexes or nasty hacks. There appears to be too much focus on storage space. Gigabytes are not expensive. The time you spend ...


1

PNG is inherently lossless. If the destination can accept it, use a JPEG instead. If not, you could try to decimate the image yourself, and then losslessly compress it with PNG. You can also try the PNG-8 mode to compress to a palette of 256 or fewer colors (which might require a lossy step), which should result in a smaller file.


0

You should give Opus a try. Example compression command line: ffmpeg -i x.wav -b:a 32k x.opus


0

You can get better compression when you use a trie or a compressed trie,a k.a patricia trie or crit-bit trie. You can try my php trie kart-trie and ternary-search-tree @ phpclasses.org.


0

Try at4j implementation of BZip2OutputStream. According to the manual it supports parallel compresion. http://at4j.sourceforge.net/releases/current/pg/ch04.xhtml


1

The inner ZipOutputStream should call finish() instead of close() as finish() flushes all compressed data, but does not close the outer zip. Mind to test the erroneousness of close() one would need to add yet another file, as the inner zip is last. Path sourcePath = Paths.get("C:/D/test.html"); try (ZipOutputStream zipOut = new ZipOutputStream( ...


0

I prefer to use option 3,and i can surely tell you that why is that. It's the most logical. It utilizes the most caching, all common functionality is loaded once. Taking the least traffic and generating the fastest loading times when surfing multiple pages. Loading times of multiple pages are important and while the traffic on your side might not be ...


1

Use libtar, a tar file manipulator.


2

There is no C++ standard library element for doing this. You must either use a special library, use an external application or develop your own text compressor. I guess the closest you get to using a "standard" library is to use the Boost libraries. I just found this question and think that Boost may have support for gzip.


1

I believe your setup, using the compression module, is correct. I just don't think it compresses the files during development. Try setting the NODE_ENV to "production", e.g. $ NODE_ENV="production" $ node server.js EDIT To your follow up question. Essentially what you are seeing in Chrome Dev Tools is the result of the compressed gzip compression. This ...


0

zlib.createGunzip() is for decompressing. I think that using headers and streams works. app.get('/', function(req,res){ res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-Encoding': 'gzip' }); fs.createReadStream('_public/index.html').pipe(zlib.createGzip()).pipe(res); });



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