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I created this class: package test.stackoverflow; import java.io.FileInputStream; import java.io.FileOutputStream; /** * * @author Pasban */ public class MyBitBuffer { private StringBuffer sb; private int index = 0; public MyBitBuffer() { sb = new StringBuffer(); } private void zero() { sb.append('0'); } ...


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I found the problem, tho I doubt it helps but you never know lol public void writeCompressed() throws IOException{ BitOutputStream fop2 = new BitOutputStream( new ObjectOutputStream( new FileOutputStream( "C:\\Users\\David\\Documents\\davidCompress.dabc"))); for (int i = 0; i < ...


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I found this https://github.com/nayuki/Huffman-Coding/tree/master/src/nayuki/huffmancoding related to your huffman coding. This might be useful. If you can provide your BitInputStream / BitOutputStream classes, which I think your problem is there, a better answer based on your codes can be suggested.


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Can you use a custom binding (binary)? (Adjust reader quotas to your liking) <customBinding> <binding name="MyHttpBinding"> <binaryMessageEncoding> <readerQuotas maxDepth="32" maxStringContentLength="2147483647" maxArrayLength="16384" maxBytesPerRead="2147483647" maxNameTableCharCount="16384" /> ...


2

The way OSIsoft PI does this is by checking how much a collected point has deviated from the previous point. If it is a small amount then the point gets "dropped" so only meaningful data is stored. When you ask for a value at a time in which no data exists. PI interpolates it.


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When I only replace JPEGs, I already get a lower file size. Removing the unused object also helps: public class ReduceSize { public static final String SRC = "resources/pdfs/annual_report_2009.pdf"; public static final String DEST = "results/images/annual_report_2009.pdf"; public static final float FACTOR = 0.5f; public static void ...


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You may use following code string[] filePaths = Directory.GetFiles(@"c:\test", "*.zip"); string filetosearch = "testfile"; foreach (var item in filePaths) { string name = Path.GetFileName(item); if (name.IndexOf(filetosearch, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) != -1) { ...


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You probably want something along the lines of string[] filePaths = Directory.GetFiles(@"c:\Test\", "*.zip") Then change you click code to foreach(var filePath in filePaths){ //your code here for each path }


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You can use the following code: foreach(var zipPath in Directory.GetFiles("C:\\Test")) { using (ZipArchive archive = ZipFile.OpenRead(zipPath)) { foreach (ZipArchiveEntry entry in archive.Entries) { var position = entry.Name.IndexOf(filetosearch , StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase); if (position > ...


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I found a solution. We can use normal version of webpack (not just gulp-webpack) to provide plugin include capability: var gulpWebpack = require('gulp-webpack'), webpack = require('webpack'); gulp.task('webpack', function() { gulp.src('webpack-init.js') .pipe(gulpWebpack({ output: { filename: 'bundle.js', }, plugins: [new ...


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By default, IIS doesn't map the MIME type for SVGs. You will have to update your Web.config to include the correct mappings for SVGs like so: <system.webServer> <httpCompression directory="%SystemDrive%\inetpub\temp\IIS Temporary Compressed Files"> <scheme name="gzip" dll="%Windir%\system32\inetsrv\gzip.dll" /> ...


4

First, you could just use any existing compression algorithm, via some library. However knowing that your input is very specialized, you can also write a special algorithm adapted yo your case. But let's first analyze how much you can compress this input. To simplify, I'll first consider compressing exactly 12 digits from 0 to 9 (you didn't explicitly ...


8

Unless your input comes from a specific domain, where many inputs are unlikely/unacceptable - you cannot do it. You can encode 62^4~=1.4*10^7 different serieses with 4 alphanumeric characters. On the other hand, input of 12 digits can have 10^12 possible different inputs. From pigeonhole principle - there must be 2 "compressions" that are mapped to the ...


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Unless there is some other redundancy in your data, no. The best you can do is 12.5%, i.e. 1/8th, since you can code each character as one bit.


4

The compression ratio is directly determined by the content of your file. For example, a file that contains only 0s N times can be compressed using log_2(N) bits (you just specify how many zeros it contains). Technically, the compression ratio is at best equal to the Shannon entropy of the source, since you may regard your file as containing symbols produced ...


1

What you are seeing is entirely expected. Data can be compressed only if it has redundancy that can be detected and exploited. Audio and video files are already compressed. There is no redundancy in them for xz to exploit. There is plenty of redundancy in text files to exploit.


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The gzip module will only open a single file that has been compressed, i.e. my_file.gz. You have a tar archive of multiple files that are also compressed. This needs to be both untarred and uncompressed. Try using the tarfile module instead, see https://docs.python.org/2/library/tarfile.html#examples edit: To add a bit more information on what has ...


1

The public domain Crush algorithm by Ilia Muraviev has similar performance and compression ratio as QuickLZ has, Crush being a bit more powerful. The algorithms are conceptually similar too, Crush containing a bit more tricks. The BALZ algorithm that was already mentioned earlier is also by Ilia Muraviev. See http://compressme.net/


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There is no builtin function in TSQL but you can write your own dll written by C# or VB.net called SQLCLR and add it to your sql. Now you can use this function.


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You can use ffmpeg, an open source video library, to do the compression. Be aware that video compression is generally quite compute intense so it is unlikely to take just 'a few seconds' except for small videos. There are a number of ways to include ffmpeg in your application. Take a look at these 'wrapper' projects for examples to ether use or to help you ...


1

You have a typo in this object declaration: res.render('index', { container1:data[0]; container2:data[1]; container3:data[2]; container4:data[3]; }); Should be: res.render('index', { container1:data[0], container2:data[1], container3:data[2], container4:data[3] });


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Try this code private void previewCapturedImage() { try { int targetW = 450; int targetH = 450; Log.e("Get w", "width" + targetW); Log.e("Get H", "height" + targetH); // Get the dimensions of the bitmap BitmapFactory.Options bmOptions = new BitmapFactory.Options(); bmOptions.inJustDecodeBounds = ...


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You probably don't have the interfaces you need in Java, but this can be done with zlib. You could write your own Java interface to zlib to do this. While scanning you would retain the last 32K of uncompressed data using a queue. You would scan the compressed file using Z_BLOCK in inflate(). That would stop at every deflate block. When you get to the ...


1

I had exact need today so came up with this code. Send this function a bitmap and it will return a file path (local) of compressed image. Then create a File object with the returned file path and send it to server: public File compressImage(Bitmap bmp) { Bitmap scaledBitmap = null; int actualHeight = bmp.getHeight(); int ...


2

for cropping image you can use this lib and for compressing the image you can use this code also. public Bitmap decodeFile(String filePath) { BitmapFactory.Options o = new BitmapFactory.Options(); o.inJustDecodeBounds = true; BitmapFactory.decodeFile(filePath, o); // The new size we want to scale to final int REQUIRED_SIZE = 1024; // Find the correct ...


0

I'm gonna suppose that you are using an Apache Web Server. You have to add into your .htaccess these lines: <ifModule mod_gzip.c> mod_gzip_on Yes mod_gzip_dechunk Yes mod_gzip_item_include file .(html?|txt|css|js|php|pl)$ mod_gzip_item_include handler ^cgi-script$ mod_gzip_item_include mime ^text/.* mod_gzip_item_include mime ...


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FWIW, this function checks if a file is gzipped: public static boolean isGzipped(File f) { InputStream is = null; try { is = new FileInputStream(f); byte [] signature = new byte[2]; int nread = is.read( signature ); //read the gzip signature return nread == 2 && signature[ 0 ] == (byte) 0x1f && ...


0

To ensure that your histc call does count the amount of x values per unique x value call it as h=histc(x,linspace(xmin,xmax,numel(unique(x(:)))); Else, if you rimage is binary and your only values are 0 and 255, histc will return a size(h)=256 size array with lots of zeroes, because xmin:xmax is 0:255=[0 1 2 3 ... 254 255]


1

If you have heard about Set Redundancy Compression (SRC) that would make your task very easy. It provides loss less and lossy image image compression techniques for set of similar images. Min-Max differential technique might be the one you seek.


1

Right now, I only compress my images. Don't. All the image formats used on the WWW have native compression schemes. You don't gain anything by adding gzip on top. Do I need to compress my minify assets like : JS, CSS, HTML? Yes. Text files benefit from gzip compression.


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You can also compress your minified JS/CSS by adding the report option: cssmin: { dist: { options: { report: 'gzip' }, files: [{... uglify: { options: { mangle: true, report: 'gzip' }, Use grunt-uncss to remove unused CSS from your projects. If you're using compass, try Spriting your images instead ...


1

Google has a good guide to optimize content efficiency. You can take a look here. The general idea is Compress text assets if possible Image is already compressed usually. Gzip/deflate cannot compress it much further. Image optimization is a better way to reduce the payload size. Use HTTP caching whenever possible.


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It is possible to have multiple threads compressing data simultaneously, as long as each thread has its own separate z_stream object. Each z_stream object should have deflateInit() called on it, then as many calls to deflate() as necessary, and then deflateEnd() called after all of the uncompressed data has been passed to deflate(). Using this technique, it ...


1

It may be late but I had similar problem in log4j XML config file and now I tried to put the file path inside "quotes" and it seems it compress now.


0

As I understand, both the calls are referring to the same zstream while calling deflate(), which is resulting in undesired behaviour. What did you expect to happen? Each thread needs it's own z_stream structure to work with. Two threads accessing the same z_stream at the same time makes no sense.


0

You are using Bitmap and BitmapFactory to convert a small jpg file to a big png file. Why aren't you sending the jpg directly? So do NOT use Bitmap and BitmapFactory to begin with. You end up else with something that was not your file.


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I found some way to continue, even if i didnt manage to decrypt the data, i'm now a least shure that it has to be encrypted/compressed, because it has a very high entropy. I wrote a tool that creates 4 bitmaps from the files data-block. I analysed the file on word and on byte basis, counting all occurances of certain bytes/words and got those two ...


1

Calling compress on a PNG will not make your file smaller as it is already compressed. Converting a binary file to a text stream will really make it big. To avoid less overhead by converting the PNG file to text file, just send the file as is, as a byte array. And add the file length in the header. You can use DataOutputStream to do this. byte[] byteArray ...


1

Why do I have this overhead? In addition to the Base64 overhead itself, you are re-encoding the image as a PNG. If the image started as something else, like a JPEG, a PNG version of that image may be substantially larger. Also, please delete the four lines preceded by // Let's read picked image path using content resolver. First, that code will fail on ...


0

It will be approximately 37% larger: Very roughly, the final size of Base64-encoded binary data is equal to 1.37 times the original data size Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base64


1

If data is that big then you should use GCM only as informer to the application that it needs to pull some updated data from server. So use a tickle message to notify the device that there is something new at server end. When you receive that tickle message from server, make a pull request to the server in response of which do the needful (Generate a ...


0

Well, bit shifting can be represented by mulitplication (for left shifts) or division (for right shifts) with powers of two. You just have to take into account that the floats will stroe the fractional parts which would normally be shifted "out" in normal integer bitshifts. So to pack 4 normalized floats a,b,c,d into a normalized float x, you can simply use ...


0

libpq documentation states that there is a parameter sslcompression which when enabled will allow the data stream to be compressed. This requires compatible OpenSSL libraries to be used and of course SSL to be enabled. Depending on how you're connecting to the server it might be an option. But there is currently no compression in the actual protocol itself. ...


1

Did you configure Snappy. Verify first snappy is loaded in all the nodes. To verify please use this command. hbase org.apache.hadoop.hbase.util.CompressionTest hdfs://host/path/to/hbase snappy Once snappy test is successful. The mentioned above compression should work. For more detail about configuration and installation of snappy: ...


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HBase will only compress new HFiles - either new data you write or the results of compactions


1

We need to configure HBase to use Snappy if we installed Hadoop and HBase from tarballs; if we installed them from RPM or Debian packages, Snappy requires no HBase configuration. Depending on the architecture of the machine we are installing on, we have to add one of the following lines to /etc/hbase/conf/hbase-env.sh: For 32-bit platforms: export ...


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You would need to configure HBase to use Snappy. You can follow steps mentioned in the reference link to enable snappy compression in hbase: configure snappy compression with HBase Hope it helps you.


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Raw deflate-compressed data begins 32 bytes in (starting with the ec 7c). You can use zlib to decompress it.


0

Not same as your example, and not minimal in size, but one approach. "ABCCCCCCCCABCCCCCCCCCCBBC".replace(/(([A-Z])\2{3,})/g,function($0,$1,$2){return $2+$1.length}).replace(/(\d+)/g,'{$1}') "ABC{8}ABC{10}BBC" "ABCCCCABCCCCCCCCCCBBC".replace(/(([A-Z])\2{3,})/g,function($0,$1,$2){return $2+$1.length}).replace(/(\d+)/g,'{$1}') "ABC{4}ABC{10}BBC"


1

The function h2s needs to break the input string into reasonable parts. As done here and in your code, Split() - on space - is used. In that case you can go without the zero padding Right("0000" & Hex(AscW(a(i))+AscW(Mid(k,y,1))), 4) in s2h. Alternatively, you can keep the padding and use s2h = Join(a, "") in s2h to get a string of 4 hex-digit chunks ...



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