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24

Since you need the Node.js part anyway, go ahead, implement everything in Node.js. If it is fast enough, this is easy enough to maintain. It's very hard to predict the power of a virtual machine / JIT compiler. If it is not fast enough, first think about algorithmic improvements. If this doesn't help and if profiling shows that the computation is the ...


22

True story: When I got my first programming job out of graduate school, the guys that owned the company that I worked for were pilots. A few weeks after I was hired, one of them asked me this question: There are 106 airports in Arkansas. Could you write a program that would find the shortest rout necessary to land at each one of them? I ...


22

When I graduated from college, I assumed that I was on par with everyone else: "I have a BS in CS, and so do a lot of other people, and we can all do essentially the same things." I eventually discovered that my assumption was false. I stood out, and my background had a lot to do with it--particularly my degree. I knew that there was one "slight" ...


19

Arrows are generalized by Categories, and so by the Category typeclass. class Category f where (.) :: f a b -> f b c -> f a c id :: f a a The Arrow typeclass definition has Category as a superclass. Categories (in the haskell sense) generalize functions (you can compose them but not apply them) and so are definitely a "model of ...


18

Sure, it's useful. Imagine a developer working on a template engine. You know the sort of thing... Blah blah blah ${MyTemplateString} blah blah blah. It starts out simple, with a cheeky little regular expression to peform the replacements. But gradually the templates get a little more fancy, and the developer includes features for templatizing lists and ...


15

The things I use most: computational complexity to write algorithms that scale gracefully understanding of how memory allocation, paging, and CPU caching work so I can write efficient code understanding of data structures understanding of threading, locking, and associated problems As to that stuff on Turing machines etc. I think it is important because ...


12

it's the difference between learning algebra and being taught how to use a calculator if you know algebra, you realize that the same problem may manifest in different forms, and you understand the rules for transforming the problem into a more concise form if you only know how to use a calculator, you may waste a lot of time punching buttons on a problem ...


10

Apache Commons - Math has what you are looking for. More specifically, check out the NormalDistrubitionImpl class.


9

Try adding a STDOUT.sync = true. You could also try STDOUT.flush after the puts. Some more info here.


9

Does this just refer to a function that produces a monadic result? Yes, in short. In long, it's because Monad allows you to inject values into it (via return) but once inside the Monad they're stuck. You have to use some function like evalWriter or runCont which is strictly more specific than Monad to get values back "out". More than that, Monad ...


9

There are a countable number of Turing machines. That doesn't mean there's a finite number. The set of Turing machines is countably infinite, which means that Turing machines can be numbered using natural numbers. That is you can create a 1-to-1 mapping between natural numbers and Turing machines.


9

Generally, a "computation in a monad" means not just a function returning a monadic result, but such a function used inside a do block, or as part of the second argument to (>>=), or anything else equivalent to those. The distinction is relevant to something you said in a comment: "Computation" occurs in func f, after val extracted from input ...


8

All Monads are Arrows (Monad is isomorphic to ArrowApply). In a different way, all Monads are instances of Applicative, where <*> is Control.Monad.ap and *> is >>. Applicative is weaker because it does not guarantee the >>= operation. Thus Applicative captures computations that do not examine previous results and branch on values. In ...


8

denshade, your C implementation goes only to 2e5 not 2e6, like you've done for js (linking to today's revs on Github): primes.c primes.js Piping to /dev/null, and changing js also to 2e5, I get about 6.5 seconds for C and about 8.5 seconds for js (using some version of node) on my current computer. Since your algorithm is O(n^2), I would expect 2e6 to ...


8

This question worries me a bit because there are better algorithms for approximately counting the number of distinct elements with small amounts of storage. Nevertheless, if we must use a Bloom filter, let's assume that the hash functions are random oracles (all values chosen independently, or “really perfect”, not to be confused with perfect ...


8

This is the knapsack problem. (That is, the decision version of this problem is the same as the decision version of the knapsack problem, although the optimization version of the knapsack problem is usually stated differently.) It is NP-hard (which means no algorithm is known that is polynomial in the "size" -- number of bits -- in the input). But if your ...


8

A friend of mine is doing work on a language with some templates. I was asked in to do a little consulting. Part of our discussion was on the template feature, because if the templates were Turing complete, they would have to really consider VM-ish properties and how/if their compiler would support it. My story is to this point: automata theory is still ...


7

Although I don't directly apply them in day-to-day work, I know that my education on formal computer science has affected my thinking process. I certainly avoid certain mistakes from the onset because I have the lessons learned from the formal approaches instilled in me. It might seem useless while they're learning it; but I bet your classmate will ...


7

It is undefined behaviour to evaluate k[8], since k only has 8 elements, not 9. There is little point arguing about the consequences of undefined behaviour. Anything could happen. Your program is not well-formed. (Note that it would even be undefined behaviour to evaluate k[0], ..., k[7], since they are unini­tia­lized. You have to write to them ...


6

At one job I was assigned the task of improving our electrical distribution model's network tracing algorithm as the one they were using was too slow. The 3-phase network was essentially three n-trees (since loops aren't allowed in electrical networks). The network nodes were in the database and some of the original team couldn't figure out how to build an ...


6

Hate to rain on your parade, but the reason it's so fast is because the math module is actually not implemented in Python. Python supports loading shared libraries that export Python APIs, but are implemented in other languages. math.so, which provides the module you get from import math, happens to be one of those (and so is _random.so).


6

What topics in the field of the theory of computation do you think are most important The question is vague. Important to who? which parts are worth learning about? All of them are worth learning about. This is a special case of the fact that all human endeavours are inherently worth learning about. If your question is "which topics provide ...


6

Have you read "What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic"? It discusses rounding error (what you're calling "computation noise"), the IEEE 754 standard for representation of floating-point numbers, and implementations of floating-point math on computers. I believe that reading this paper would answer your question, or at ...


6

Let a = (x+1)^2, that's 2 ops. Then y=3a + 5a^2 = a(3+5a), 3 more ops for a total of 5.


6

import operator a_dot = [reduce(operator.mul, col, 1) for col in zip(*a)] But if all your data is 0s and 1s: a_dot = [all(col) for col in zip(*a)]


5

Redirection with > is done by the shell. So the first thing that happens when executing cat data_$N.dat | xargs ./program.exe > data_$N.dat is that the shell opens data_$N.dat for write and truncates it. Now it's empty, so when cat starts it finds a file but it has already been truncated. Just redirect your output to a temporary location (it's ...


5

Multiplication is a much more complex process, requiring more silicon either as a multiplier circuit or in a lookup table in order to reach the same level of performance as provided by addition.


5

If you don't need all the digits, you can get away with using logarithms. The log of (0.4 ^ 100000000) is log(0.4)*100000000, well within the regular floating point range.


5

When compiling to byte code, constant expressions such as 2**19937 will optimized down to a single constant: >>> def foo(): return 2**10 ... >>> import dis >>> dis.dis(foo) 1 0 LOAD_CONST 3 (1024) 3 RETURN_VALUE >>> Consider instead: [~] python -m timeit 'x=2' ...


5

You need to create a class that holds Thing1 and Thing2, e.g: class Things { public final Thing1 thing1; public final Thing2 thing2; public Things(Thing1 thing1, Thing2 thing2) { this.thing1 = thing1; this.thing2 = thing2; } @Override public boolean equals(Object obj) { ... } @Override public int hashCode() { ... ...



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