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4

If you want to observe the array itself and don't care about the values in it, your property should observe 'model.[]' instead, like }.property('model.[]') Example fiddle Array docs


3

The problem you are seeing is because your are returning a promise as the value of the property and handlebars won't evaluate that promise for you. What you need to do is create a separate function that observes question and then call your store there to update the totalCount-property. It would be something like this. App.TestController = ...


3

This concept is called Reactive Programming. .NET has something called Reactive Extensions that would allow you to achieve what you have described. Specifically you need to use something called Behavior


2

You could create an object with an indexer property which would contain your computation: class Foo { public int this[int index] { get { return index*2; //Your computation here } } } or class Foo { public int this[int row,int col] { get { return row*col; //Your computation here } } } ...


2

CP will be calculated every time the A or B is set (unless they both manage to get set in one run loop). The computed property is bound to both A and B. That is why is it preferable to put the computed property in the controller. Let the controller decorate the model. The computed property will then only be calculated when the controller is active - when ...


2

You can add runtime dynamic values using {code:...} constants. An example of getting the current date and making a backup of the installation folder can be seen on the ISXKB wiki


1

Alternatively totalCount might lazily set itself, like this: App.TestController = Ember.ObjectController.extend({ totalCount: 0, question: // evaluate to something, totalCount: function() { var that = this; that.store.find('question', {test: that.get('id')}).then(function(items) { var count = ...


1

The problem lies in that em is a relative unit in CSS, which means that an element whose font-size is in ems will base the font-size on its parent's font-size. In your second example, it seems that the body has had its font-size changed to 75%, which you need to change to 100%. The behind-the-scenes calculation that is occuring here is that html's default ...


1

You can create your own array class that takes functions instead of values: class ComputedArray<T> { private Func<T>[] _array; public T this[int index] { get { return _array[index]( ); } } public void Set(int index, Func<T> func) { _array[index] = func; } public ComputedArray( int size ) { ...


1

This is perfect for OO languages as the way references work. At an abstract level I would handle this as such: Create an abstract class, Expression, that will be the base type for all values in our program. Something like: public abstract class Expression { List<Expression> linkedExpressions; protected Expression lhs; // left hand side, right ...


1

You can only access properties of objects that way. For global values, window[ name ] will work. For simple local variables it's just not possible at all. That is, if inside a function you've got var something; then there's no way to get at that variable if all you have is the string "something".


1

I would just put each array as a prop on an object: var obj { incidentWizard: ['page1.html','page2.html','page3.html'], magicWizard: ['page1.html','page2.html','page3.html'] }; Then you can just do obj['incidentWizard'] or obj.incidentWizard this will return: ['page1.html','page2.html','page3.html']


1

On this line: wizardName = [wizardName] + 'Wizard'; You are attempting to concatenate the string 'Wizard' to an Array with one string element "incident". I'm assuming you just want regular string concatenation: wizardName = wizardName + 'Wizard'; However, now you only have a string, not an array instance. To fix that, change the way you define your ...


1

You have two problems: ko.observable returns a function so you need to get its value with calling it as a function with (). For example: self.column1() and self.column1() by default the this inside a computed is not the "current" object so you should use self instead (or pass this as the second argument of ko.computed) So the fixed sum would look like ...



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