New answers tagged

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Don't reinvent the wheel :) Check out http://librosa.github.io, especially the part about the Short-Time-Fourier Transform (STFT) or in your case rather something like a Constant-Q-Transform (CQT). But first things first: Let's assume we have a stereo signal (2 channels) from an audio file. For now, we throw away spatial information which is encoded in the ...


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Thanks to the response for Nevado above I was able to come up with a solution by grouping two adjacent values in two groups.


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Simplifying the map does not make much sense, I suppose you mean simplify the expression, in which case yes, you can. You would have to make two groups of two ones (trues), getting Y1 = A1B1A2' + A1B1B2'.


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For Inoder Traversal, Thumb rule is leftChild - Root - rightChild Follow up on below link for better understanding


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Okay, I solved it! (linear time) As you go, you want to track: d[i], the minimum distance to each index D[i], the minimum distance to ANY value of each index. In the first pass, set d[i]=i for all i, and set D[i] equal to the minimum d[i] across all indices with that value. Congratulations, you now have the minimum distance to your starting position! In ...


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Same problem with me. It seems it´s a bug. Lots of posts out there: https://forums.xamarin.com/discussion/65862/i-cant-build-any-android-project At this one I´ve seen a light and worked for me: https://bugzilla.xamarin.com/show_bug.cgi?id=39910 In short: Close VS DEL your folder C:\users\\appdata\local\xamarin DEL your project sub-folders BIN and OBJ at ...


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Let's go backwards with more steps (A+B)(AB)' <=>A(AB)' + B(AB)' (distributivity) <=>A(A'+B') + B(A'+B') (demorgan on (AB)') <=>AA' + AB' + BA' + BB' (distributivity) Since AA' and BB' evaluate to false (i.e. T AND F or F AND T result in False), they can be removed from the chained or-condition leaving (False OR X <=> X) AB' + ...


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So it turns out that even with g() overriding f(), if the input is outside of the range of both the first and overriding function; the output is an error as it never qualifies for either test. Similarly when we try to factorise a negative number using a calculator. Well, thanks for anyone who tried to answer my question... And thanks for the down vote. ...


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I think this site have very good example and explanation :D


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The diagram is for a classic 5 stage MIPS pipelined architecture. Modern chips use superscalar design, but let's ignore that [at least for the moment]. The problem here is that the diagram shows the times for the various types of instructions [for each T-state T1-T5], but there is no sample program to execute, unless the diagram is also an example of the ...


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Consider this max-heap (which I'll draw as a tree, but represents [7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 1, 2]. 7 6 5 4 3 1 2 What's the last element that can be inserted? The last slot filled in the heap must be the bottom-right of the tree, and the bubbling-up procedure can only have touched elements along the route from that node to the top. So the previous ...


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The reason why the second set doesn't work is that you are attempting to modify a string literal (char *colour = "foo") which is not allowed in C. As an aside, both versions have undefined behavior, and you should consider compiling with all of the -W flags on.


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What the question asks is, How many combinations are there to insert elements to the binary tree in order to obtain the maximum height of the binary tree Suppose if we insert elements to the tree in the reverse sorted manner. First 5, then 4 and finally 1. In this case, each element will be added to the right of the parent making a tree of height 5. ...


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This solution is a bit unpleasant but it works for this case. _.chain(data) .mapObject((value, key) => { if (key==='people') { return value.map((p,i) => _.extend(p, {rank: i})); } else { return value; } }) .value();


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Paramiko library could be one of the solutions here: import paramiko ssh = paramiko.SSHClient() ssh.set_missing_host_key_policy(paramiko.AutoAddPolicy()) ssh.connect(host, username=username, password=password, port=port, timeout=30) # setting up ssh connection ssh.exec_command('<Execute Your Remote Script here>') ssh.close()


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Actually, it seems that MySQL uses both kind of indexes either a hash table or a b-tree according to the following link. The difference between using a b-tree and a hash table is that the former allows you to use column comparisons in expressions that use the =, >, >=, <, <=, or BETWEEN operators, while the former is used only for equality comparisons ...


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If you got negation you can use: P NOR Q <-> P XNOR Q AND NOT P It should be granted as known, that you can implement all with NOR. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NOR_gate


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Just use (!whatever.isEnabled()) The character '!' is similar to a NOT in Java. So it will behave like isDiabled()


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I'm not sure if I understand correctly, but this looks like it could be just a z-index issue. Try putting in the CSS z-index:0 on the element that should be below, and z-index:1on the element that should be on top. See if this helps


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A few insights/ideas you might explore: where the values are similar in length - or little bigger than pointers - closed hashing will give you better performance than any open hashing aka separate chaining approach the length of words being checked is a cheap (perhaps free if you're tracking it anyway) way you can direct validations to methods that are ...


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In both of your trials, what is noticeable is that the majority of words are correctly spelled. Consequently, you should focus on optimizing lookup of words which are in the dictionary. In your first trial, for example, only 1.5% of all words are misspelled. Suppose it takes twice as long on average to look up a word which is not in the dictionary (because ...


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This is a pretty well-solved problem. ;-) You should look into a data structure called a trie. A trie is a tree built of individual characters, so that the path represents the information. Each node consists of letters you can legitimately add to the current prefix. When a letter is a valid word, that is also recorded. For four words: root-> [a]-> ...


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Okay, I'm going to take a stab at this. I'm not an expert on this stuff, but I've spent some time thinking about @UdayReddy's answers to this question that you linked to, and I think I've got my head wrapped around it. Referential Transparency in Analytic Philosophy I think you have to start where Mr. Reddy did in his answer to the other question. Mr. ...


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For connected graphs, vertex cover must be a dominating set. For isolated nodes, you need to include that in dominating set but don't need it in vertex cover. However, dominating sets are larger class, they needn't be vertex cover as the example in this reply shows.


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By adding a constant to all the weights you shall make paths with more number of edges more costly and paths with less number of edges relatively less costly hence disrupting the original problem. So you can't apply Dijkstra even if there is no negative weight cycle.


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This is the "Maximum coverage problem", which is a class of problems thought to be difficult to solve efficiently (so-called NP-hard problems). You can read about the problem on wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximum_coverage_problem A simple algorithm to solve it is to enumerate all subsets of size 5 of your friends, and measure the size of union ...


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Definitions Let's say A == B means A and B always evaluate to the same boolean expression given any assignment of the free (boolean) variables x_i. The boolean expression equivalence problem is, given A and B to say whether A == B. The boolean tautology problem is, given A, whether for all possible assignments of the free (boolean) variables x_i, A ...


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All you really need to know from CS is how to count in binary and use bitwise operators, really stuff you could just glean from a Wikipedia article. It would also be helpful to learn some basic discrete math to evaluate the efficiency of algorithms. However, a CS course in algorithms would't be that helpful beyond comparison since quantum algorithms are ...


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I wouldn't use a GridPane for this. In fact, I’m pretty sure a GridPane alone can’t do what you want. You can make a center-aligned HBox for each row, and put those rows into a single VBox: Collection<HBox> buttonRows = Arrays.asList( new HBox(6, previous, search, next), new HBox(6, add, edit, remove), new HBox(6, clear, quit)); ...


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First of all NAND is not "and not" but "not and", the logical table is P Q NAND(P,Q) 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 second of all, there is nothing hard about NAND nor your gate. The "only" problematic one is XOR (and nXOR). P Q XOR(P,Q) 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 So: single perceptron can easily ...


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The machine code (or, in the case of Java, virtual machine code) generated for the statement int foo = arr[55]; Would be essentially: Get the starting memory address of arr into A Add 55 to A Take the contents of the memory address in A, and put it in the memory address of foo These three instructions all take O(1) time on a standard machine.


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I have figured out a solution to this. I'm assuming arrays are initialized with all 0's (otherwise N needs to be filled with 0) and that M is a adjacency matrix for the graph. I let n be the number of nodes (n = |V|). j,i = 1; N = new int[n] while (j <= n && i <= n) { if (N[i] == 1) { i++ } else if (N[j] == 1) { j++; } else if ...


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It's just following terminology, global max is the "peak" in that span, although, not necessarily the highest peak we can find. So any 'column peak' can be a start point to find a 2D peak(while in the algorithm, it's the global max)


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In theory, array access is O(1), as others have already explained, and I guess your question is more or less a theoretical one. Still I like to bring in another aspect. In practice, array access will get slower if the array gets large. There are two reasons: Caching: The array will not fit into cache or only into a higher level (slower) cache. Address ...


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Arrays store the data contiguously, unlike Linked Lists or Trees or Graphs or other data structures using references to find the next/previous element. It is intuitive to you that the access time of first element is O(1). However you feel that the access time to 55th element is O(55). That's where you got it wrong. You know the address to first element, so ...


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If we say the subscript operator (indexing) has O(1) time complexity, we make this statement excluding the runtime of any other operations/statements/expressions/etc. So addElements does not affect the operation. Surely it'd take longer to find element 55 than it would element 1? "find"? Oh no! "Find" implies a relatively complex search operation. We ...


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To find an element isn't O(1) - but accessing element in the array has nothing to do with finding an element - to be precise, you don't interact with other elements, you don't need to access anything but your single element - you just always calculate the address, regardless how big array is, and that is that single operation - hence O(1).


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Array is a data structure, where objects are stored in continuous memory location. So in principle, if you know the address of base object, you will be able to find the address of ith object. addr(a[i]) = addr(a[0]) + i*size(object) This makes accessing ith element of array O(1). EDIT Theoretically, when we talk about complexity of accessing an array ...


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The address of an element in memory will be the base address of the array plus the index times the size of the element in the array. So to access that element, you just essentially access memory_location + 55 * sizeof(int). This of course assumes you are under the assumption multiplication takes constant time regardless of size of inputs, which is arguably ...


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Round-Trip-Time means that you have to take into account the ACK (acknowledgement message) you must receive that tells you the frames you are sending are being received by on the other side of the link. This 'time' window is the period where you get to send the remaining frames that the window allows you to send before you anticipate an ACK. Ideally you ...


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(You seem to be working with log probabilities, which is very sensible, but I am going to write most of the following for the raw probabilities, which you could get by taking the exponential of the log probabilities, because it makes the algebra easier even if it does in practice mean that you would probably get numerical underflow if you didn't use logs) ...


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It is implementation dependent. Usually, however, a loop will start to scan from left to right and will get the first 3. But how I say thare is not a standard. This is a possible implementation according to Wikipedia: procedure SelectionSort(a: list to sorts); for i = 1 to n - 1 posmin ← i for j = (i + 1) to n if a[j] < a[posmin] ...


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Although your specific question about swapping in 3 is easy to answer, a more general version of it is not easy, because selection sort is not stable. Classic implementation will pick 3 at the third index, because the condition for picking the next element to swap is if (a[i] < a[iMin]) Once the first 3 is swapped into position 0, the second 3 at ...


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All the answers saying "no" are only correct if you are assuming the "typical" type of finite state machines (FSMs) known as deterministic finite automata (DFAs), which can only have a single active state at any given time. However, this is not the only type of FSMs, and there is no good reason to restrict yourself to this type of mechanism in all cases. ...


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For every edge u-v that is not on the MST, the smallest spanning tree including the edge is the one where u-v replaces the largest edge on the path from u to v on the MST. The edge to be replaced can be found efficiently as follows. First, root the MST at an arbitrary vertex. We will modify the algorithm to find the lowest common ancestor (LCA) of two ...


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The type in your first example is called bit field or flag field. Each constant is represented by a single bit. This means that you can combine different settings within one variable by using the bitwise or operator, for example ability = WALK | JUMP. Later you can extract the single property by using a bitwise and, like canJump = ability & JUMP This is ...


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It's also used a lot in engineering. For example in video games if there is logic that is causing a lot of switching without a good result you can add hysteresis to the problem, and cause the objects to commit to a particular direction for a period of time which can avoid twitching issues. Similar to what is done in electronics with Schmidt triggers - to ...


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In Fortran 77 lines were divided into sections by columns and each part of your code had to go into a specific section. Specifically for non-comment lines , the first 5 columns would either contain that line's label or be blank if the line had no label. Column 6 would contain an arbitrary non-space character if the line was a continuation of a previous line ...


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Byte Code is the Object Code of the JVM . They are the same is the answer to your question. They are the same in the sense that Byte Code is an object code. But, an object code isn't necessarly byte code. There are more explanations within the link below as this is a repeat question (Edited)Oh and Apparently this is a repeat question: Does Java produce ...


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In a flash memory a cell is the minimal storage unit, which usually correspond to a single floating gate transistor. It follows naturally that a bad cell is a not working storage unit. The term is apparently valid and used, at least in this paper: Flash Memory Technology Sometimes audio flash devices may contain some bad cells. In a NAND flash cells ...



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