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1

Verba docent, Exempla trahunt. Best seen on an interactive GUI-Demo A configurable UI-panel allows to adjust parameter(s) by moving a few sliders import sys import cv2 import math import numpy from scipy.ndimage import label pi_4 = 4*math.pi def nothing_asCallback(x): pass def GUI_openCV_circles(): # ...


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most likely others are faster because other parties use faster compression while sending you the data. Or try to send less data, for example divide the screen with 8 x 8 blocks, and only send those blocks that have changed in between.. things like that are often used in such apps.


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There are many different approaches that you can follow here. If your images are of good quality, then you could detect feature points in your input image, and then match them with a "prior/template" representation of a similar gesture. This would be a brute-force search. Here, you can use SIFT to detect keypoints and generate descriptors for each image, ...


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1. Indexing You're misunderstanding the way that NumPy indexes images. NumPy prefers row-major indexing (y, x, c) for images for the reasons described here: The drawback of [column-major indexing] is potential performance penalties. It’s common to access the data sequentially, either implicitly in array operations or explicitly by looping over rows of ...


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Yeah things get complicated when applying those parameters to the vtk camera. Here is how I did it (just excerpts of the important code passages, the whole code would be way too much to paste here and would be useless for you anyway). Other points to consider: I am rendering the endoscope image as background texture in my vtkRenderWindow. I am using a ...


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Once you understand what these filters do mathematically, it is quite clear what and you have to change. And where in the pipeline this must be. In his answer, Totoro already pointed out that you can pass your own filters to be run. Sobel edge detection works by first running two filters on the image. These filters give the gradient of the image in X and ...


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You can write a custom filter and use cvFilter2D (2D convolution). To give a very simple example, the convolution kernel {1 0 -1;1 0 -1; 1 0 -1} is a 3x3 filter that can highlight intensity decreases going from left to right. You can threshold the result to get the edges. You will have to select the right size of the kernel, and also the right values, to ...


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You can use a classification machine learning algorithm like logistic regression. This algorithm tries to minimize the cost function to predict a picture input similarity to all classes (all gestures in your case) and it'll pick the most similar class and give you that. for pictures you should use each pixel as a feature for your data. After feeding your ...


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You have not matched any points. Look at this example: http://docs.opencv.org/doc/user_guide/ug_features2d.html. You need to extract descriptors and then match them with FLANN for instance. Then you can draw your matches ;)


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In new OpenCV, I have implemented a surface matching module to match a 3D model to a 3D scene. No initial pose is required and the detection process is fully automatic. Please check that out a video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFnqLFznuZU


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The paper is indeed not very good on providing the relevant information in an easily accessible way. SPTS: "similarity normalized shape features" CAPP: "Canonical normalized appearance" CAPP: They cite 3: ( A. Ashraf, S. Lucey, J. Cohn, T. Chen, Z. Ambadar, K. Prkachin, P. . Solomon, and B.-J. Theobald. The painful face: pain expression recognition ...


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What you are looking for are two separate calibration steps: Alignment of depth image to color image and conversion from depth to a point cloud. Both functions are provided by windows sdk. There are matlab wrappers that call these SDK functions. You may want to do your own calibration only if you are not satisfied with the manufacturer calibration ...


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The scales are represented differently between BRISK and SURF. The reported BRISK scale is based on the radius of the BRISK sampling pattern. The SURF scale is represented by the detection scale "s" of the box filters used for keypoint detection. Details about this can be found in the original references: (BRISK) ...


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Results first 1 Typo in Kernel As Bharat Singh pointed out, your y-Kernel looks wrong. (Later analysis shows that it changes the results but that isn't the main problem.) If you want you can use your original kernel in my code below to see what the result is. (For posterity: kernely(3,:) = [-1, 0, 1];) Basically, it looks like the input image. 2 Use ...


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Your kernel in the y direction seems to be incorrect, it should be [ 1, 2, 1; 0, 0, 0; -1, -2, -1]; Further, if you want to improve edge detection, you can look into Hysteresis, its an easy way to complete some obvious contours in an image which might be missed out ...


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When you calibrate a single camera, you can use the resulting cameraParameters object for several things. First, you can remove the effects of lens distortion using the undistortImage function, which requires cameraParameters. There is also a function called extrinsics, which you can use to locate your calibrated camera in the world relative to some ...


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In your JNI, after the call to Vite(), to copy back the content and free the buffer you should have env->ReleaseIntArrayElements(out, _out, 0); Here is a test program for Vite() #include <opencv2/objdetect/objdetect.hpp> #include "opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp" #include "opencv2/imgproc/imgproc.hpp" #include <iostream> using namespace std; ...


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I assume you are working with 1 just camera, so only intrinsic parameters of the camera are in the game. (1),(2). Once your camera is calibrated, you need to use this parameters to undistort the image. Cameras dont take the images as they are in reality as the lenses distort it a bit, and the calibration parameters are for fixing the images. More in ...


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Hi but still its not clear by your answer that how to get the image location co-ordinates in source image via SIFT or SURF algorithm....Please explain!I am using minHessain value as 400 in my program.


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2 hours later I found the answer :) For some reason #include can't be included directly so the following code will include the video module indirectly. #include "opencv2/video/tracking.hpp" #include "opencv2/video/background_segm.hpp" Answer here : http://fossies.org/dox/opencv-2.4.9/video_8hpp.html


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it's in the video module, so: #include <opencv2/video/video.hpp>


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Approach #1 No-loop bwlabel based - threshold = 100; [L,num] = bwlabel( Iobr ); counts = sum(bsxfun(@eq,L(:),1:num)); B1 = bsxfun(@eq,L,permute(find(counts>threshold),[1 3 2])); Iobr = sum(B1,3)>0; figure, imshow(Iobr); Approach #2 bwconncomp based - threshold = 100; CC = bwconncomp(Iobr); count_pixels = cellfun(@numel,CC.PixelIdxList); for k = ...


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You will find a list of alternative AR SDKs along with a comparison of each here http://socialcompare.com/en/comparison/augmented-reality-sdks From what I can tell this list is pretty active and updated frequently.


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Sadly you dont have a working example, however since you are dealing with BW images, regionprops should work: BW = imread('coins.png'); % convert to BW BW2 = BW > 80; figure imshow(BW2) % properties thresh = 2500; % Threshold of 2500 px [B,L] = bwboundaries(BW2); props = regionprops(L, 'Area'); sel_idx = find([props.Area] > thresh); hold all for n ...


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If floodfill does not provide you with a sufficient mask, another way could be to take the edge image from figure 1 and apply a dilation operator and then a closing operator. The mask will be slightly larger than the original due to the dilation although the dilation helps in closing black spots when applying the closing operator. This is the result I ...


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The code in the second box is meant to be executed by the command line. Under Windows you would have to replace cd with chdir and you would need make installed. You also need to find where mkoctfile is located on Windows and provide that information to make like it is done in the example. Compiling on Windows There is also good information on how to ...


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There are plethora of papers on this, including (1,2) of mine. I can tell you that this is not a simple problem, if you want to achieve a high success rate for a reasonably large no. of test images. The red spots are called "hemorrhages". The exudates, microaneurysms, cotton wool spots and hemorrhages are some of the important keywords you should know. You ...


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The Number of hidden layers: The number of hidden layers required depends on the intrinsic complexity of your dataset, this can be understood by looking at what each layer achieves: A single hidden layer allows the network to model only a linear function. This is inadequate for most image recognition tasks. Two hidden layers allows the network to model an ...


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I think the problem can be split into two parts: Localisation of the iris regions Estimating the colour Step one is time consuming, but I have done this at my workplace. You can train a Haar-cascade classifier for iris images (grayscale), and localise the iris within the eye-region returned be the cascade classifier for the eyes. If you already have a ...


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1) Convert to HSV and take H or take gray-scaled form. Apply median filter to smooth the fields :P if images are high-resolution. 2) Extract histogram and find all the peaks. These peaks indicate the different colored fields. 3) (A) Now you can use simple thresholding around these peaks-value and then find canny edges for trapezium or similar shapes. ...


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If your router has a DHCP reservation feature, simply tell the router to always give an IP camera a certain IP. Thus when the camera polls the DHCP server when it connects to the network, it will automatically receive its reserved IP. Other clients without a reservation will simply receive a random IP like normal. You might even think about doing this for ...


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I assume that you are referring to pyramidal approach which is frequently used in optical flow. The patch is first detected at upper pyramid scale, than the obtained coordinates are rescaled and the patch is searched again in lower pyramid scale. Haar object detection does not need image rescaling as the features can be easily rescaled using integral image. ...


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I would go for template matching methods which are looking image gradients. Those approaches are robust to changing lighting conditions. You can take a look at the fast template matching algorithm implemented in: https://github.com/dajuric/accord-net-extensions Samples included. The implemented template matching algorithm is based on orientation of ...


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The exactly what you need is implemented in: https://github.com/dajuric/accord-net-extensions check fast template matching sample, particle filter sample (hand tracking). The class which is suitable for holding history is called History.


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I have not worked with the Kinect controller, but you can try fast template matching algorithm implemented in: https://github.com/dajuric/accord-net-extensions Just use your depth image instead standard grayscale image. The samples are included. P.S. This library also provides other tracking algorithms such as Kalman filtering, particle filtering, JPDAF, ...


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For 2D alignment - to discover the affine transform that maps a set of landmark points onto another set - you are probably best starting with the classic Procrustes Analysis. Here someone very graciously provides a converted implementation (from Matlab) into python. Using this, here's how I can do what I think you are after... import procrustes as pc ...


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Well, I haven't used HoG specifically but judging from other descriptors, usually they are not the same. The actual feature is the descriptor while the detector as you can guess it is used to detect (to locate) the feature. There is no point in finding interesting points and then extract features from the whole image. (Again) I don't know how HoG exactly ...


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If you have a lot of points, say 68..then you can perform delaunay triangulation and then perform piecewise affine warp. If you have much fewer than 68, say 5 or 6, then you can try least square fitting of affine or perspective transform. I believe you can use the findhomography function of opencv and then use perspectivetransform function to perform this ...


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I found that the conceptual answer is here: http://pascallin.ecs.soton.ac.uk/challenges/VOC/voc2012/htmldoc/devkit_doc.html#SECTION00054000000000000000 from this thread: Compare two bounding boxes with each other Matlab I should be able to code this in python!


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Try the implementations of the MSER algorithm in MserFeatureDetector. The original algorithm was thought for grayscale pictures, and I don't have good experiences with the color version of it, so try to do some preprocesing of the original frames to generate grayscales according to our needs.


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Part 1 I think your problem is setting alpha to 0 (transparent) in this line: img2 = Mat(img1.size(), img1.type(), Scalar(186, 44, 28, 0)); Change it to img2 = Mat(img1.size(), img1.type(), Scalar(186, 44, 28, 255)); Since the only difference is the alpha channel, that is the first place to look. If either img1 or img2 has 0 alpha your result will ...


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You're simply misinterpreting the binary data of the bitmaps. The source bitmap is 24 bits per pixel, whereas the new bitmap is 8 bits per pixel. Notice how on the source, each value is repeated three times. (3 times 8 bit bytes = 24 bits) If you just combine each set of three bytes into a single byte, it matches the target bitmap. You also appear to be ...


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vimage is faster if it can reuse the buffers. So if possible declare and allocate the buffer (or the associated data) outside the loop. unsigned char *sourceData = (unsigned char*)malloc(patchSide * patchSide * sizeof(uchar)); vImage_Buffer source = {sourceData, patchSide, patchSide, patchSide}; unsigned char *destinationData = (unsigned ...


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If you can use local network, then Yes, you should use fixed IP address....if the Camera SDK is compatiable with OpenCV this you dont have have to worry about this and you can call VideoCapture directly. Or, you could use the camera SDK to get frames directly and then copy these frames to opencv image format and use opencv. This should not be too ...


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10x10 is a very small image. You easily could be spending most of your time in overhead / malloc. Instruments time trace should help determine where the time is going. The vector ALU on 4s is also half the width of a 5 or 5s, so doesn't provide as much of a win over scalar.


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You can make your code faster by replacing this: cv::Mat_<uchar>::iterator it = img.begin<uchar>(); cv::Mat_<uchar>::iterator end = img.end<uchar>(); for (; it != end; ++it) if (*it) points.push_back(it.pos());` ...with this: points.push_back(cv::Point(0,0)); points.push_back(cv::Point(img.rows,0)); ...


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Unfortunately the current MATLAB implementation only computes the 512 bit BRISK descriptor.


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The homography coefficients are known only up to a common scale factor, so it is only sensible to speak of their accuracy in relative terms. A global number is rather meaningless. Normally one is more interested in the reprojection error, that is, the distance observed when applying the homography to a point and comparing it to a matching point in the other ...


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The formula you wrote is valid only in the special case when the image planes of the two cameras are on the same geometrical plane, and the motion from one to the other is a translation parallel to one of the image axes. In the general case you'll need to triangulate actual rays in 3D space, using one of the techniques described in that book (it has a ...


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I think this web site have the answer : OpenCV The diference is eepending on there train data, so that, if you want to select a suit classifier, I prefer you try both two to find a better result.



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