Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Which programming guide? When you calibrate a stereo pair, either camera can be camera 1. It is easier if camera 1 is the left camera, because otherwise your disparity will be negative. And left means camera's left, i.e. left as you look in the same direction as the cameras.


0

I am not very sure, but I guess that none of your results is equal to 90 deg is because of coordinate system. The coordinate system in which you rotate the camera by 90 deg about z axis is defined by yourself. You can imagine a camera pose as a vector pointing to the scene, and the R matrix decomposed from essential matrix denotes the rotation of the ...


1

The physical quantities of interest are the sensor size and the focal length. The latter, in the pinhole camera model, is the the distance between the camera center and the image plane. Therefore, if you denote with f the focal length (in mm), W and H respectively the image sensor width and height (in mm), and assume the focal axis is orthogonal to the image ...


-2

Same problem here but I was trying to load an image. As gfkri said in comments you must check with an if statement the Mat image something like. It's like you try to show a NULL image ;) image1 = imread("sample.jpg",CV_LOAD_IMAGE_COLOR); if(image1.empty()) { cout << "Image not found or loaded"; } else { ...


2

but in a way that has some intelligence about the objects in the screen instead of just a simple color/hue/etc. analysis What you are suggesting is a complex problem by itself, so forget about 'lightweight' solutions. Probably you are going to need something like optical flow. Other options I would recommend you looking into are: Vanishing points ...


0

If you can mark 4 points in image coordinates, then you can map these points to another quadrangle, or more specifically, rectangle using a homography. You will also need the whiteboard aspect ratio so that your result will have the correct X and Y equal scales. With this homography you can warp the video to straighten the board. Note that the warping will ...


1

As mentioned, D is a dense range image meaning that for any pixel location x in D where x = [x y]T, D(x) is the depth at pixel location x (or simply D(x, y)). Estimating the optimal Gradient in a least-square sense Suppose we have the following neighborhood around the depth value 5 in D(x) for some x: 8 1 6 3 5 7 4 9 2 Then, using the ...


0

Mean filter (rectangular kernel) is optimal for reducing random noise in spatial domain (image space). However Mean filter is the worst filter for frequency domain, with little ability to separate one band of frequencies from another. Gaussian filter has better performance in frequency domain. Mean filter is the least effective among low-pass filters. ...


0

This was due to HSV.step giving wrong values. I used the width value, and it works perfectly fine.


1

In case of cascade classifier I would suggest to throw away the "half" objects. Since are they positive samples? no since they don't contain the object entirely, are they negative samples? no , because they are not something which have nothing to do with our object. In my experience I started with training with almost similar number of negative and ...


2

To invert a homography (e.g. perspective transformation) you typically just invert the transformation matrix. So to transform some points back from your destination image to your source image you invert the transformation matrix and transform those points with the result. To transform a point with a transformation matrix you multiply it from right to the ...


0

You should apply the following: 1. Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization-CLAHE and convert to gray-scale. 2. Gaussian Blur & Morphological transforms (dialation, erosion, etc) as mentioned by @bad_keypoints. This will help you get rid of the background noise. This is the most tricky step as the results will depend on the order in which you ...


0

Regardless of whether the object is a checkerboard or not, you need a way to reliably map 3d points (on the object), to 2d ones (on the images). With the setup you describe, you can get the pose of the moving camera w.r.t the fixed one object as object-to-fixed * inverse(object-to-moving). This will work even if the object is w.r.t either camera, provided ...


0

It uses the false position ("regula falsi") method. I have not seen a proof that the sequence converges for this particular equation, regardless of the choice of distortion parameters (or even for every choice of "physically plausible" parameters). It'd be very easy to write one for a few special cases, e.g. physical pure 2nd-order barrel distortion. In ...


1

Well, for posterity sake I did a comparison of the approaches mentioned before. I took a typical image with a full range of grayscale pixel intensities, then took a dark and light version of the same image and got the graythresh value for each. I Applied the Otsu threshold using each of the above mappings. The light image pretty clearly demonstrates that ...


-1

Your third answer seems most right to me, with the clarification that 'full range of grayscale pixel values' depends on the data type of the input image. For example, for a uint8 image, an Otsu threshold of 0.75 corresponds to around 191. For a uint16 image, this would correspond to 49151.


0

This is a great paper. You can find every thing about various state of the art background subtraction algorithms: A comprehensive review of background subtraction algorithms evaluated with synthetic and real videos In the section 4.3.4.3. of this paper you can see comparison between algorithms when they encounter with different degree of shadow in test ...


1

If the accuracy you get is "pretty random" then you are likely not doing it right: with stable optics and a well conducted procedure you should consistently be getting RMS projection errors within a few tenths of a pixel. Whether this corresponds to variances of millimeters or meters in 3D space depends, of course, on your optics and sensor resolution ...


-1

I don't know wht you mean by color invariant, but if you want a fast approach, use the SURF features. You input the program the reference you are searching and then you feed the current image (Like in this). If you relaz the SURF extractor enough, you can get speeds of up to 10Hz, and even mkore if you use GPU SURF implementation (also available in ...


1

You're specifying the source using the wrong parameter. For IMAGE_DATA you need to use image_data_param instead of data_param. Because you specify your source in data_param, and ImageDataLayer looks at image_data_param, the value of source is the empty string. You can see that in the log here: I0624 10:36:11.525106 15246 image_data_layer.cpp:36] Opening ...


1

Ideally you want to place your checkerboard at roughly the same distance from the the camera, as the distance at which you want to do your measurements. So your checkerboard squares must be large enough to be resolvable from that distance. You also do want to cover the entire field of view with points, especially close to the edges and corners of the frame. ...


1

Unfortunately, the short answer is "no". vision.PointTracker is a System Object, which is a special kind of MATLAB class. In a System Object, properties may be tunable or non-tunable. Non-tunable properties can only be changed before you call the step method of the object for the first time. Currently, all properties of vision.PointTracker are non-tunable, ...


3

Gaussian filters weigh pixels a bell-curve around the center pixel. This means that farther pixels get lower weights. Mean-filter, a.k.a box-filter, just average the pixel values of all neighboring pixels. This is equivalent to giving an equal weight to all pixels around the center regardless of the distance from the center pixel. Box-filters can be ...


1

The correct answer is the first one : dark = 75 and light = 230, relative to the range of values in each image graythresh uses the min and max values in the image as boundaries, which is the most logical behavior.


2

The window size should be chosen, s.t. the object(s) you want to detect fit into the window. If you want to have different window sizes for different types this might become tricky. Usually what you do is the following Take training data for each type of objects, and train [number of object types] many models using the features extracted at the known ...


0

If your camera is attached to object B, first you will have to design an algorithm to detect and track object A. A simplified algorithm can be: Loop the steps below: Capture video frame from the camera. If object A was not in the previous frame, detect object A (manual initialisation, detection using known features, etc.). Otherwise, track the object ...


2

So, the way that you've framed the question you will absolutely see poor accuracy and there's very little you can do to change it. Assigning a single emotion to a video (depending on your corpus), is generally inaccurate enough that any machine learning algorithm will have trouble learning the signal you're trying to pull out. Additionally, you've framed ...


0

I would start with: (a) face detection, to find the faces in each image. (b) I'd then proceed to use a facial recognition algorithm. For (a) you can use OpenCV's Cascade Classifier - here's an example. Note it is not really state of the art. You can try Piotr Dollar's toolbox with much better performance if you like Matlab. For (b) you can either use one ...


1

Regarding my comment in the original question, I implemented something that might serve as an example of fixed grid construction: #define SQUARE_SIZE 131 #define OFFSET_X 75 #define OFFSET_Y 75 #define NUM_SQUARES_X 8 #define NUM_SQUARES_Y 8 using namespace std; using namespace cv; int main(){ // Directory settings const string pathToData = ...


2

I personally would advise using the indico image features API. Basically you pass in the image you're dealing with and get back a set of features that represent higher-level morphological-structures within that image. If you compute cosine-similarity on top of those features you'll get a more intuitive similarity metric. There's a great github link showing ...


1

Here is GPU version as well. cv::Mat temp; gpu::GpuMat gpu_img, descriptors; cv::gpu::HOGDescriptor gpu_hog(win_size, Size(16, 16), Size(8, 8), Size(8, 8), 9, cv::gpu::HOGDescriptor::DEFAULT_WIN_SIGMA, 0.2, gamma_corr, cv::gpu::HOGDescriptor::DEFAULT_NLEVELS); gpu_img.upload(img); ...


2

There is ocr function in the Computer Vision System Toolbox.


1

This was because there was an empty row in the csv file and also the encoding had to be UTF-8


0

"Capture images" means take images of the checkerboard pattern with the cameras that you are trying to calibrate. Generally, you can load images of any format that imread can read into the Stereo Camera Calibrator app. However, it is much better not to use a format with lossy compression, like JPEG, because the calibration artifacts affect the calibration ...


2

The Mathworks documentation on the Stereo Camera Calibration app does give specific advice on image formats: Use uncompressed images or lossless compression formats such as PNG. There's also a great deal more information on the details of what sort of images you need, under the "Image, Camera, and Pattern Preparation" subheading, in the expandable ...


0

Emgu.CV::CameraCalibration.SolvePnP(Emgu.CV.Structure.MCvPoint3D32f[], System.Drawing.PointF[], Emgu.CV.IntrinsicCameraParameters, Emgu.CV.CvEnum.SolvePnpMethod) Upgrade and install the latest NuGet package. Estimates extrinsic camera parameters using known intrinsic parameters and extrinsic parameters for each view. The coordinates of 3D object points and ...


0

Do you have to filter each image with multiple kernels? In that case you should only call integralImage(I) once for each image, and store and re-use the result. Computing the integral image takes some time. However, once you have it, applying an integral kernel to the resulting integral image should be very fast.


0

The camera calibration will probably always somewhat inaccurate, because for more than 2 calibration images instead of getting one true solution to equation system acquired from calibration images, You get the solution with the smallest error. The same goes to cv::solvePnP() . You use one of three methods of optimising the many possible solutions for given ...


0

I agree with other message : today, openCV is the best (and the only ...) computer vision library. In open source world, you also can check Scilab, Octave, but it's complicate to package an final application. Don't forget that you have some good propritary lib like Halcon from MVTech. But I also agree that openCV need to improved his compile tools/lib ...


0

Given RECT = [x_min, y_min, width, height] The method is: XYs = []; Xs = [x_min:x_min+width]'; Ys = [y_min:y_min+height]'; for i = 1:size(Xs,1) XYs = cat(1, XYs, [Xs .* ones(size(Ys,1),1), Ys]); end clear Xs Ys Just be careful the result XYs is [columns, rows]. Thanks!


0

Use image processing to identify the solid line (you may need to apply various filters, detect edges etc). When you identify the center line (or ruler - it really does not matter which), you have to decide how much you are going to rotate the image and in which direction (you didn't mention any of this info). Let's say, you decided to rotate in clock wise ...


0

You do element-wise multiplication of DFT response of both filter and the image. Before you compute FFT, you have to pad the kernel with zeros to make it the same dimension as that of the image. This is why the FFT option is only computationally efficient if the size of the filter is too large or at least comparable to the dimension of the image. To have a ...


0

Just use find to obtain the pixel coordinates. Assuming your image is binary and stored in im, do: [r,c] = find(im); r and c will be the rows and columns of every pixel that is white. This assumes that the object is fully closed - one caveat I'd like to mention. If there are holes in the interior of the object, consider using imfill to fill in these ...


1

You can compute the homography transformation between the two bounding boxes using the fitgeotrans function. You can then apply the resulting transformation to the image using imwarp.


2

OK. You have the contour of the puzzle trapezoid. You have the bounding box. You want a nice looking square. This is a subjective part of your system. You can, for example, just snap the target height to the width: Rect target(0,0,boundbox.width,boundbox.width); How to actually transform the trapezoid into a square? First, crop/set the roi to the target: ...


0

Do you know the physical size of the object, and is it the same in all images? Then the scale is exactly one, because you are in a calibrated setup. If either condition above does not apply, then you cannot recover a physically meaningful scaling factor.


-1

If it is a rectangle you wish to edit in an image I , then the simplest way is just I(xmin:xmax,ymin:ymax) = whatever; or, in your terms: I(RECT(1):RECT(1)+RECT(3), RECT(2):RECT(2)+RECT(4)) = whatever; without actually creating a mask. matlab will interpret this as a rectangle (not a diagonal line). You may as well want to use the form : ...


0

Yes, that's a very inefficient way to do it. Use meshgrid instead: [xs,ys] = meshgrid(RECT(1):RECT(1)+RECT(3), RECT(2):RECT(2)+RECT(4)); xs = xs(:); ys = ys(:); meshgrid defines a 2D grid of points that span over a certain range. The first parameter is a vector of x values and the second parameter is a vector of y values. This ultimately becomes a 2D ...


0

The simplest approach, as described by Ajay, is to cluster keypoints into N clusters and then define N binary features, such that for a given sample, feature i equals 1 if the sample shows a keypoint in cluster i, and 0 otherwise. Another approach is to use a kernel classifier, like Support Vector Machines (SVM), and use a kernel that accepts ...


2

You can use the bitdepth parameter to set that. imwrite(img,'myimg.png','bitdepth',16) Of course, not all image formats support all bitdepths, so make sure you are choosing the the right format for your data.



Top 50 recent answers are included