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15

blocking is meant to act as a hint to the ExecutionContext that the contained code is blocking and could lead to thread starvation. This will give the thread pool a chance to spawn new threads in order to prevent starvation. This is what is meant by "adjust the runtime behavior". It's not magic though, and won't work with every ExecutionContext. Consider ...


8

There is always some type associated with a channel. Let's assume that the type is T. A channel of T is: chan T A pointer to a channel of T is: *chan T A channel of pointer to channel of T is: chan *chan T A function accepting the channel of pointer to channel of T is: func f(c chan *chan T) { } Because channels are reference types, you probably ...


8

When profiling the application, no other threads are being allowed to run while the long transaction takes place. Most likely, this task is using a resource which is single threaded. i.e the way ti is written prevents concurrent usage. How can I run 100,000 transactions as fast as possible without running into memory problems? If the transactions ...


7

No, it's definitely not guaranteed to be atomic. Whether it's implemented using an uniterruptible instruction (sequence) or not is up to the compiler and platform. But from the point of view of the standard, it's not atomic; so if one thread perfroms x |= 0x1; and another thread accesses x without a synchronisation point in between, it's Undefined Behaviour ...


6

It's because the Java memory model does not guarantee that memory writes by one thread will be visible to other threads unless you use some form of synchronization. For performance and simplicity, Swing is not synchronized. Therefore, writes from other threads may never be visible to the EDT. The application you've seen may work most of the time, and it ...


6

There is no synchronization between the ping and pong goroutines, therefore there is no guarantee that the responses will print in order. If you force the goroutines to race with GOMAXPROCS>1, you get random output: pong ping ping pong ping pong ping pong pong This isn't even an example of a "ping-pong", since there's is no call and response.


6

You are calling getName() on a Thread object, what do you expect? Of course you will get the name of that Thread object. Only that is not the thread you are currently operating in, for example: Test t = new Test(); t.getName(); // What do you think you'll get? I assume what you want to know will be answered by Thread.currentThread().name(); Let me ...


5

All Swing components are implemented to be accessed from a single thread (the event dispatching thread). So there are no protections against concurrent access and concurrent changes of variables and field. If you are lucky everything works well. But you cannot rely on it and the same code can have massive problems on the next run. A simple example: The ...


5

In Java 8 you can use CompletableFuture to chain your filters after each other. Use the thenApply and thenCompose family of methods in order to add new asynchronous filters to the CompletableFuture - they will execute after the previous step is finished. thenCombine combines two independent CompletableFutures when both are finished. Use allOf to wait for the ...


5

The general answer is that inter-thread coordination has a cost, so sending a task off to another goroutine can only speed things up if the task is at least a certain size. So don't send single items. For a divide-and-conquer algorithm like quicksort, the ways to parallelize can be interesting. Generally: when you recurse, you can start the "sort one half ...


5

Calling getThread on your Test object returns the name assigned to that thread object, regardless of what thread is executing the run method of the Test object. If you fix your code so that you're always getting the name of the current thread: public class Test extends Thread{ public void run() { System.out.println("run() called on thread: " ...


5

It is useful when you have a small set of element for a thread safe collection. One example is a Set of listeners. You need to ensure uniqueness and iterate over them efficiently. BTW CopyOnWriteArraySet has the lowest overhead on a per reference basis. It can be as little as 1/6 the size of the other collections. This is particularly useful if you ...


4

You must return the deferred given by $.ajax : function fun() { return $.ajax({//this ajax call should return an ip From the documentation to explain why your callback is executed : If a single argument is passed to jQuery.when() and it is not a Deferred or a Promise, it will be treated as a resolved Deferred and any doneCallbacks attached ...


4

Your statement is correct: if the Person class is mutable, and an update is done on a field that contributes to hashCode and equals, then the PersonSet will have a problem - no matter in which thread. The no duplicate Set contract will be broken, silently...


4

First a comment. This doesn't reproduce the behaviour of join(), if you add a sleep between Thread.start() and the synchronized block for a longer time than the other thread sleeps, the code hangs (while a join() wouldn't)... The answer to your question is well hidden in the Javadocs of Thread.join() As a thread terminates the this.notifyAll method is ...


4

How about reading the entered value from a JTextField or reading the state of a JCheckBox and using those results to influence the method executing on the worker thread? Easy: The state of the JTextField and the JCheckBox would be read on the Swing event thread, the information then would likely be passed into the Worker via its constructor (again on ...


4

First, thank you for taking a look at CO2 :) The Boost.Coroutine doc describes the advantage of stackful coroutine well: stackfulness In contrast to a stackless coroutine a stackful coroutine can be suspended from within a nested stackframe. Execution resumes at exactly the same point in the code where it was suspended before. With a ...


4

I assume you are referring to this segment of code: try { boolean b = true; while (true) { b = !b; } } catch(Exception e) { System.out.println("exception happened hurray!"); } The reason you cannot catch an InterruptedException here is because there is nothing inside of that block that can throw an InterruptedException. interrupt() ...


4

I would say you're not using it the way it's intended to be used. First of all, Scala Promises are primarily a mechanism for "bootstrapping" Futures, so the values you pass around should generally be Futures and not Promises. That makes the chain of accesses one segment shorter. Next, the reason you are going through so many layers is that Futures ...


4

Good question! This is actually specifically addressed by clause 25 in ยง1.10 of the C++11 standard: An implementation should ensure that the last value (in modification order) assigned by an atomic or synchronization operation will become visible to all other threads in a finite period of time. So the answer is yes, the value is guaranteed to ...


4

I don't see any benefit in the first approach. I'd just use LINQ to find the items though: foreach (var entry in dictionary.Where(e => e.Value == "A")) { string ignored; // Do you actually need to check the return value? dictionary.TryRemove(entry.Key, out ignored); } Of course, you need to consider what you want to happen if another thread ...


4

You are falling for a very common trap with the Thread API: the failure to distinguish a thread from an instance of the Thread class. These two are completely different concepts: a thread is not even an object, it is the system resource that does the execution of your code. A Thread, on the other hand, is just a plain Java object, which happens to have some ...


4

Copy-on-write structures are functionally immutable. Java at one point had a very poor story for providing immutable views on writeable structures such as sets. For example, if you had a set member, and you returned it publicly, the caller could just turn around and edit it, and therefore be editing your object's internal state! But what else can you do, ...


4

You are creating a new ReentrantLock per runnable meaning there is no synchronization. You will need to share the one lock with each Runnable instance.


4

Immutable Objects (with only final fields) are only "threadsafe" after they are properly constructed, meaning their constructor has completed. (The VM probably accomplishes this by a memory barrier after the constructor of such objects) Lets see how to make your example surely unsafe: If the Bar-Constructor would store a this-reference where another ...


4

Yes, it is safe. Your code does not introduce a data race, hence, it is synchronized correctly. All objects of both classes will always be visible in their fully initialized state to any thread that is accessing the objects. For your example, this is quite straight-forward to derive formally: For the thread that is constructing the threads, all observed ...


4

(I'm not completely happy with the answers so far, so here is my attempt...) I think that Kevin Wright's comment ("You can make a Promise and it's up to you to keep it. When someone else makes you a promise you must wait to see if they honour it in the Future") summarizes it pretty well, but some explanation can be useful. Futures and promises are pretty ...


3

The reason is that any S1 is Sync, but T doesn't carry that information. You have to make sure that pointer is Sync even in the absence of the info that it is S1. There are multiple ways to do this: Make the trait always Sync: trait T : Sync { fn func(&self); } Make the Pointer T+Sync: fn main() { let pointer: &(T + Sync) = ...


3

Yes it is thread safe. Thread safe in the sense that only one thread at a time can do read on set via containsPerson method or may be able to add set via addPerson method. This class is thread safe because it has one Object state i.e. Set it self. So it protects it's state by allowing only one thread to work upon it. However it doesn't guarantee that ...


3

Ah, the confusion between an event loop and multithreading... When you instantiate your first promise, the underlying implementation is such that after the creation, JavaScript hands over control back to the next instruction, which is to start the loop. This instruction (if you prefer, the function IETF in the promise) starts running, and does not stop ...



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