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89

What does it mean? That means that each iterator you obtain from a ConcurrentHashMap is designed to be used by a single thread and should not be passed around. This includes the syntactic sugar that the for-each loop provides. What happens if I try to iterate the map with two threads at the same time? It will work as expected if each of the ...


77

Concurrency is hard. If you are going to bother with concurrent maps instead of straightforward locking, you might as well go for it. Indeed, don't do lookups more than necessary. Set<X> set = map.get(name); if (set == null) { final Set<X> value = new HashSet<X>(); set = map.putIfAbsent(name, value); if (set == null) { ...


66

From the author of ConcurrentHashMap himself (Doug Lea): The main reason that nulls aren't allowed in ConcurrentMaps (ConcurrentHashMaps, ConcurrentSkipListMaps) is that ambiguities that may be just barely tolerable in non-concurrent maps can't be accommodated. The main one is that if map.get(key) returns null, you can't detect whether the key ...


66

I found the reason: it is a Problem of gcc-4.7!! With gcc-4.7 inserts: 37728 get : 2985 With gcc-4.6 inserts: 2531 get : 1565 So std::unordered_map in gcc-4.7 is broken (or my installation, which is an installation of gcc-4.7.0 on Ubuntu - and another installation which is gcc 4.7.1 on debian testing). I will submit a bug report.. until then: ...


45

The point is to provide an implementation of HashMap that is threadsafe. Multiple threads can read from and write to it without the chance of receiving out-of-date or corrupted data. ConcurrentHashMap provides its own synchronization, so you do not have to synchronize accesses to it explicitly. Another feature of ConcurrentHashMap is that it provides the ...


37

These two classes vary in a few ways. ConcurrentHashMap does not guarantee* the runtime of its operations as part of its contract. It also allows tuning for certain load factors (roughly, the number of threads concurrently modifying it). ConcurrentSkipListMap, on the other hand, guarantees average O(log(n)) performance on a wide variety of operations. It ...


34

This is of course a "feature". The ConcurrentHashMap.computeIfAbsent() Javadoc reads: If the specified key is not already associated with a value, attempts to compute its value using the given mapping function and enters it into this map unless null. The entire method invocation is performed atomically, so the function is applied at most once per key. ...


24

Right after the code has acquired the object’s monitor, the reference to the object is stored into the tab which is the globally visible array of nodes which make up the contents of the ConcurrentHashMap: Node<K,V> r = new ReservationNode<K,V>(); synchronized (r) { if (casTabAt(tab, i, null, r)) { Right at this point, other threads ...


24

This is fixed in JDK-8062841. In the 2011 proposal, I identified this issue during the code review. The JavaDoc was updated and a temporary fix was added. It was removed in a further rewrite due to performance issues. In the 2014 discussion, we explored ways to better detect and fail. Note that some of the discussion was taken offline to private email for ...


22

Further to Ken's answer, if creating a heavyweight object which later gets thrown away is NOT acceptable (you want to guarantee that only one object gets created for each key, for some reason), then you can do this by.... actually, don't. Don't do it yourself. Use the google-collections (now guava) MapMaker class: Map<KeyType, HeavyData> cache = new ...


22

Try this: public void record(String key, String value) { List<String> values = entries.get(key); if (values == null) { entries.putIfAbsent(key, Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<String>())); // At this point, there will definitely be a list for the key. // We don't know or care which thread's new object ...


18

I am guessing that you have not properly sized your unordered_map, as Ylisar suggested. When chains grow too long in unordered_map, the g++ implementation will automatically rehash to a larger hash table, and this would be a big drag on performance. If I remember correctly, unordered_map defaults to (smallest prime larger than) 100. I didn't have chrono on ...


17

I guess this depends on your use case, but why would you need a CopyOnWriteMap when you already have a ConcurrentHashMap? For a plain lookup table with many readers and only one or few updates it is a good fit. Compared to a copy on write collection: Read concurrency: Equal to a copy on write collection. Several readers can retrieve elements from the map ...


16

You need to read the javadocs for the ConcurrentHashMap.values() method, paying special attention to this description of how the iterator for the values() collection works: "The view's iterator is a "weakly consistent" iterator that will never throw ConcurrentModificationException, and guarantees to traverse elements as they existed upon construction of ...


16

I believe it is, at least in part, to allow you to combine containsKey and get into a single call. If the map can hold nulls, there is no way to tell if get is returning a null because there was no key for that value, or just because the value was null. Why is that a problem? Because there is no safe way to do that yourself. Take the following code: if ...


15

Tom's answer is correct as far as API usage goes for ConcurrentMap. An alternative that avoids using putIfAbsent is to use the computing map from the GoogleCollections/Guava MapMaker which auto-populates the values with a supplied function and handles all the thread-safety for you. It actually only creates one value per key and if the create function is ...


15

ConcurrentHashMap allow concurrent access to the map. HashTables too offers synchronized access to map, but your entire map is locked to perform any operation. The logic behind ConcurrentHashMap is that your entire table is not getting locked, but only the portion[segments]. Each segments manages its own HashTable. Locking is applied only for updates. In ...


13

All operations on a ConcurrentHashMap are thread-safe, but thread-safe operations are not composable. You trying to make atomic a pair of operations: checking for something in the map and, in case it's not there, put something there (I assume). So the answer to your questions is yes, you need to check again, and your code looks ok.


13

You should be using the putIfAbsent methods of ConcurrentMap. ConcurrentMap<String, AtomicLong> map = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, AtomicLong> (); public long addTo(String key, long value) { // The final value it became. long result = value; // Make a new one to put in the map. AtomicLong newValue = new AtomicLong(value); // Insert ...


12

The short answer: set "initial capacity" to roughly how many mappings you expect to put in the map, and leave the other parameters at their default. Long answer: load factor is the ratio between the number of "buckets" in the map and the number of expected elements; 0.75 is usually a reasonable compromise-- as I recall, it means that with a good hash ...


12

ConcurrentHashMap.get() is thread safe. You can make HashMap thread safe by wrapping it with Collections.synchronizedMap()


11

The iterator is indeed thread-safe for the ConcurrentHashMap. But what is not thread-safe in your code is the ArrayList<Double> you seem to update! Your problems might come from this data structure. You may want to use a concurrent data structure adapted to you needs.


11

Every segment is separately rehashed so there is no collision. ConcurrentHashMap is array of specialized hash tables which are called Segments From the source code final Segment<K,V>[] segments; /** * Segments are specialized versions of hash tables. This * subclasses from ReentrantLock opportunistically, just to * simplify some locking and ...


11

The point is to avoid synchronization when you don't need it. If you don't mind seeing new elements in some cases and not seeing them in others, using ConcurrentHashMap's iterator can be significantly cheaper than either preventing other threads from adding items while you're iterating or taking a consistent snapshot when the iterator is created. So yes, ...


10

This issue of creating an expensive-to-create object in a cache based on a failure to find it in the cache is known problem. And fortunately this had already been implemented. You can use MapMaker from Google Collecitons. You just give it a callback that creates your object, and if the client code looks in the map and the map is empty, the callback is ...


10

If it is safe to temporarily have more than one instance for the thing you're trying to cache, you can do a "lock-free" cache like this: public Heavy instance(Object key) { Heavy info = infoMap.get(key); if ( info == null ) { // It's OK to construct a Heavy that ends up not being used info = new Heavy(key); Heavy putByOtherThreadJustNow = ...


10

You may use this class to test two accessing threads and one mutating the shared instance of ConcurrentHashMap: import java.util.Map; import java.util.Random; import java.util.UUID; import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap; import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService; import java.util.concurrent.Executors; public class ConcurrentMapIteration { ...


10

You HashCompare::hash() returns sizeof(int), which, I guess, means every entry maps into the same bucket. It seems like you are not using it as a hash table, more of a linked list. You could try using Boost's hash: #include <boost/functional/hash.hpp> template<typename K> struct HashCompare { static size_t hash( const K& key ) ...


10

They are functionally different. replace only stores the key-value pair if there already was a value stored under the specified key. The API documentation of replace explains it: Replaces the entry for a key only if currently mapped to some value. This is equivalent to if (map.containsKey(key)) { return map.put(key, value); } else return null; ...


10

ConcurrentMap.putIfAbscent returns the previous value associated with the specified key, or null if there was no mapping for the key. You did not have a value associated with "key 3". All correct



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