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6

It is because conditional operator has higher precedence than assignment operator and the expression is interpreted as ((a<=20)? (b=10) : c)=30; What is returned from conditional operator is not a lvalue (N15706.5.15, footnote 110), so the program will emit compile error. You can use parentheses to overcome this problem of precedence. a<=20? (b=10)...


5

You can use the in operator like so: def number(x): if len(x) in (4, 6) and x.isdigit(): print "True" else: print "False" where in checks for containment in a given container. Note that 4 or 6 on their own evaluate to something undesirable, which is why your first code segment fails. You can check it out on the python shell: >>> 4 or ...


4

You never need an else clause. (It's hard to offer examples of something that is not necessary, so I'll leave it at that.) edit as a comment notes, square brackets in language syntax notation usually indicate that something is optional.


4

You need a space before the closing argument, ], of the [ (test) command: if [ "$(wmctrl -l | grep Wunderlist)" = "" ]; then .... else .... fi As a side note, you have used the shebang as bash but running the script using sh (presumably dash, from the error message).


3

Replace: if [ "$(wmctrl -l | grep Wunderlist)" = ""]; then With: if ! wmctrl -l | grep -q Wunderlist; then grep sets its exit condition to true (0) is a match was found and false (1) if it wasn't. Because you want the inverse of that, we placed ! at the beginning of the command to invert the exit code. Normally, grep will send the matching text to ...


3

you can use pd.cut() method in order to categorize your data: Demo: In [66]: events = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(0, 23, 10), columns=['hour']) In [67]: events Out[67]: hour 0 5 1 17 2 12 3 2 4 20 5 22 6 20 7 11 8 14 9 8 In [71]: events['time_slice'] = pd.cut(events.hour, bins=[-1, 6, 12, 18, 23], labels=['night','...


2

You can use native conditionals combined together, is_cart(), is_checkout() and is_account_page(), in the footer.php file of your active theme or child theme, this way to hide some elements from footer (for WooCommerce shop page and products pages): if ( !is_cart() || !is_checkout() || !is_account_page() ) { // On WooCommerce shop and product pages ...


2

Short answer: len(x) in [4, 6] or len(x) == 4 or len(x) == 6. "or" is a boolean, or logical choice. (4 or 6) is guaranteed to resolve to a non-zero (true) value. In this case, it resolves to 4, so your test case passes.


2

Here's a NumPy approach to it - tags = ['night','morning','afternoon','evening'] events['time_slice'] = np.take(tags,((events.hour.values-1)//6).clip(min=0)) Sample run - In [130]: events Out[130]: hour time_slice 0 0 night 1 8 morning 2 16 afternoon 3 20 evening 4 2 night 5 14 afternoon 6 7 morning 7 ...


2

You could create a function: def time_slice(hour): if hour <= 6: return 'night' elif hour <= 12: return 'morning' elif hour <= 18: return 'afternoon' elif hour <= 23: return 'evening' then events['time_slice'] = events.hour.apply(time_slice) should do the trick.


2

It is 100% valid. No, it is not bad practice. If you don't need it, don't write it. Take the following for example: function doStuff(data) { if (data.something) { // go format the data in some way } else if (data.somethingElse) { // go format the data in some other way } // must be formatted correctly, don't do anything ...


1

Your code is missing parentheses around assignments. This compiles and runs correctly: int a = 20, b = -1, c = -1; a<=20? (b=10) : (c=30); printf("b=%d, c=%d\n", b, c); Demo. Note: It goes without saying that such (mis)use of ternary operator has negative impact on readability of your code, and should be avoided in favor of a regular if statement.


1

The answer is either to fix a few bugs with your code, and/or switch to a better compiler. After adding a proper forward declaration, and declaring the static class member as public, the following compiles without issues with gcc 6.1.1: #include <utility> struct EmptyBase { }; template<int R, int C> class Foo; template<int R, int C> ...


1

You're creating an infinite loop: while (!"S".equals(userInput)) || (!"Q".equals(userInput)); // always true For this condition to not hold you'll need an input that is equal to "S" and to "Q" together. It's easy to see applying De-Morgan's law: while (!("S".equals(userInput)) && "Q".equals(userInput))); // always true Obviously, it won't ...


1

The ending else is not mandatory. As for whether it is needed, it depends on what you want to achieve. The trailing else clause will execute when none of the specified conditions is true. If the conditions are guaranteed to be mutually exclusive, then an else clause is entirely superfluous, except possibly to contain an assertion that catches the "...


1

Your template shouldn't use global variables. It's better to store such logic in your action: actions: { CallThisAction(){ if(!global || !global.x){ return; } // do something } }


1

You can create another variable and assign it appropriately: <c:forEach var="i" items="${bean.results}"> <c:choose> <c:when test="${empty i.shippingDate}"> <c:set var="inputDate" value="<%=todaysDate%>" scope="request"/> </c:when> <c:otherwise> <c:set var="inputDate" value="${i....


1

$fields = []; if (!$job->id && $program) { $fields['job_copy'] = [ 'label' => 'Copy Job From', 'type' => 'select', 'textAsValue' => false, '_comment' => 'Selecting a job here will copy all job information except the name.', 'opts' => array_replace([0 => '-- ...


1

Let's use a bit of mathematical notation. So you have two number ranges, [a, b] and [x, y], where [a, b] represents the concept of "all numbers between a and b". One interpretation is you want to see if [a, b] is a subset of [x, y]. if a >= x and b <= y: ... Another is that you want to see if [a, b] intersects [x, y] in any way. That happens ...


1

I'll go ahead and answer Any way to write cleaner code for this? Yes. Return the boolean value, rather than printing a string. def number(x): return len(x) in {4, 6} and x.isdigit() print(number("1234")) # True Then, it is simple do use your method in a if-statement without string comparison.


1

The trouble is in your or statement. Any value greater than one will evaluate to True when you put it in a conditional. So (4 or 6) will always resolve to true. You could use the in statement above or you could just use two =='s: if (len(x) == 4 or len(x) == 6) and x.isdigit() It's a bit wordier, I find it easier to read.


1

It helps to examine the logic of this line: if (len(x) == (4 or 6)): The (4 or 6) clause contains a logical or short circuit. The value 4 is true, so it is evaluated and returned to the == relational comparison. The way that or works is that its lefthand side is evaluated for Boolean truth, and its value is returned if true. If the lefthand side is ...


1

You probably wanted to write if (len(x) in (4, 6)) and x.isdigit(): Instead of if (len(x) == (4 or 6)) and x.isdigit():


1

Your If statement looks wrong. If you need to check if two conditions are met, use: If Datarray(p, 1) <> Empty And Datarray(p + 1, 1) <> Empty


1

You can remove footer from WooCommerce product page - if (is_product()) { // here is your footer code which you want to display on woocommerce product page } else { // past your all footer code here for other pages } use this code in footer.php file . If you want to learn more, you can check this - WooCommerce conditional tags


1

Yes of course there is is_account_page() native WooCommerce conditional that returns true on the customer’s account pages. Here is an example using is_account_page() and is_user_logged_in(). To get the my account link url you can use: get_permalink( get_option('woocommerce_myaccount_page_id') ). if ( !is_account_page() ) { // User is NOT on my account ...


1

Select the relevant column and HOME > Styles - Conditional Formatting, New Rule..., Use a formula to determine which cells to format and Format values where this formula is true:: =LEN( enter the reference to your mystery column 1)>160 Format..., select colour Fill (highlight) of your choice, OK, OK. However, as noted by @Scott Holtzman, where ...


1

Ruby uses the case for writing switch statements. As per the Ruby Docs: Case statements consist of an optional condition, which is in the position of an argument to case, and zero or more when clauses. The first when clause to match the condition (or to evaluate to Boolean truth, if the condition is null) “wins”, and its code stanza is executed. ...



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