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I was facing the same problem in case of PostgreSQL and performed the following steps for successful database connection with Netbean: Remove all the connection pools and data sources created by you from GlassFish using admin console Go to your project in NB and add New->Other->Glassfish->JDBC Connection Pool. Give pool name and select “New Configuration ...


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Enable port sharing on your TCP binding like this, tcpBinding.PortSharingEnabled = true; Or, Change maxConnections available on your TCP binding configuration to something of your choice.The default for Max connection is 10 out of the box.


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Connection pooling is automatic in ADO.NET. Most likely you don't need to know that it exists. Your code is fine. Be sure to dispose of the connection when you're done. The International Space Station has nothing to do with this. Neither has IIS.


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You have not implemented any connection pooling, you are using the broken DirContext connection pool from Sun. This is discouraged. Take a look at Spring LDAP's ContextSource pool. It works very well.


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How about SELECT user() I use this before.MySQL, H2 is OK, I don't know others.


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Using a connection pool in a batch is a matter of convenciency. It will help you limit the amount of open connections, abandoned time, close connections if you forget to close them verify if the connection is open etc. Check out the Plain Ol' Java example here


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One way to debug is to add performance counters to trace / log / exception handling. NumberOfActiveConnectionPoolGroups, NumberOfActiveConnectionPools and NumberOfPooledConnections are probably the counter values you need to debug the problem. MSDN Link


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I can see many actions happening once Reader is open. If any exceptions raised on dependent function like : myNav.Categories = GetCategoriesCollectionFromReader(reader); can keep the reader open. Safe side exclusively close the reader. like this: public static NavigatorEntity GetNavigator(int navigatorID) { Database db = ...


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I would recommend using the Abandon configurations options. <Resource type="javax.sql.DataSource" name="jdbc/FOODB" factory="org.apache.tomcat.jdbc.pool.DataSourceFactory" driverClassName="com.microsoft.sqlserver.jdbc.SQLServerDriver" url="jdbc:sqlserver://Foobar\Inventory;databaseName=FooInventory;user=johnDoe;password=astrongpassword;" ...


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You need to add some options 1 in the connection pool configuration to detect if the connection is still valid. The simplest way is to run a simple SQL statement 2 to test the connection. So the pool configuration can be: <Resource type="javax.sql.DataSource" name="jdbc/FOODB" factory="org.apache.tomcat.jdbc.pool.DataSourceFactory" ...


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Your connections are almost certainly timing out due to inactivity, based on your log message of com.microsoft.sqlserver.jdbc.SQLServerException: Connection reset by peer: socket write error you could read this Technet note which says, A connection was forcibly closed by a peer. This normally results from a loss of the connection on the remote socket due ...


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I found that using GF 4.1 and NB 8.0.1 (on Ubuntu 14.04 and Windows 2008 server both 64 bit) and using the mysql-connector-java-5.1.34-bin.jar file -> fixed all my problems.


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The latter: a pool is associated to a single database configuration parameters, and it is your responsibility to instantiate as many pools as database I will use. Create the pools accordingly. I have a DataSourceFactory to accomplish this: public final class DataSourceFactory { private static final Logger LOG = ...


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Yeah, you are right inside method there is no concurrency problems , until you are using shared variables inside it, in other words "Stateless objects are always thread-safe." Servlet is quite good example of it ;) edited. For making your code safe I recommend you to do follow: private static Connection connect() throws Exception { if (ds == null) { ...


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I like tigeronk2's idea of one connection per worker. As he says, Celery maintains its own pool of workers so there really isn't a need for a separate database connection pool. The Celery Signal docs explain how to do custom initialization when a worker is created so I added the following code to my tasks.py and it seems to work exactly like you would ...


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You can safely increase max_client_conn to a higher number. That is the total number of clients that can connect to bgbouncer, not to the PostgreSQL server. It can be as high as you want, for example 2000 or even higher. That is indeed one of the main purposes of a connection pooler - to hold small amount of connections open to the database, while allowing ...


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i think you can use pool with define Resource via xml: <Resource name="jdbc/UsersDB" auth="Container" type="javax.sql.DataSource" maxActive="100" maxIdle="30" maxWait="10000" driverClassName="com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" url="jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/usersDB" username="root" password="secret" /> and after ...


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You probably don't need connection pooling at all: https://cloud.google.com/sql/faq#connections ... if the time to create a new connection is about the same as testing if an existing connection is alive and reusing it, then we recommend that you create a new connection to service each HTTP request, and reuse it for the duration of the request. In ...


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I think to accomplish this, you would want to use the NumberOfActiveConnections performance counter in ADO.Net (if that is an option for you). This article talks about that specific counter: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms254503(v=vs.110).aspx It's off by default, so you'll have to add some configuration to enable it. That is detailed in the ...


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Based on my research, I have come up with the following solution. Instead of using the more direct approach shown in most Jython example code, I instantiate a DataSource using Java methods. (I took this from example code on the Apache Tomcat site.) Then, instead of calling a zxJDBC method to obtain a connection object, I make use of what that method relies ...


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You'll need a different c3p0 DataSource for each JDBC url. A Connection pool must contain homogeneous Connections: all checked out Connections must be equivalent from a client's perspective. If Connections from multiple databases were included in the same pool, clients would have no way of specifying or knowing which db they were communicating with. (If ...


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You can use CLIENT_IDENTIFIER attribute to preserve the actual user who logged in to the application. Please find below more information from Oracle documentation: Support for Application User Models by Using Client Identifiers Many applications use session pooling to set up a number of sessions to be reused by multiple application users. Users ...


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First and foremost, I made a HUGE mistake. I was confusing Spring's Scheduled Task with Quartz. Secondly, I was able to accomplish this using a bean with AutoWired. Basically, I have the following in each of my "jobs" or tasks: @Autowired MyCustomDBConnPoolManager mgr; For the actual class code for MyCustomDBConnPoolManager @Service("databaseManager") ...


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You can choose between two ways: use oracle.jdbc.pool.OracleConnectionPoolDataSource as datasource class use commons-dbcp https://gist.github.com/splatch/2d631ec09f9be0730b1e (this is fork of somebody else gist)


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In your project.clj :ring definition where you specify a :handler, you can also specify :init and :destroy keys, with functions that take no arguments which will be called on startup (for :init) and destruction (:destroy) of your servlet. project.clj: :ring {:handler hello-world.core/handler :init hello-world.core/setup-connectionpool ...


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In fact, you'll likely don't need a connections pool at all, as the right solution is to use memory-based ReloadFromJDBCDataModel wrapper, which, as the side-effect, decreases the number of connections to 1.


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Okay, I did some digging and figured this out myself. (Thanks for the many kind folks on the tomcat-users mailing list!) JB Nizet is right: if you are creating Tomcat database connection pools from Java code, each DataSource you instantiate literally is/represents a separate connection pool. This was surprising to me; coming from a .NET background, I ...


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Try to close connection in your Dao class and ask for new one from connection pool for every request to database. Connection con; try { con=DBConnectionUtil.getConnection(); //some code here } finally { if(con!=null){ con.close(); } And it's not safe to have Connection as a object field, better to use it as a local variable, because ...



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