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54

In Lisp, a linked list element is called a CONS. It is a data structure with two elements, called the CAR and the CDR for historical reasons. (Some Common Lisp programmers prefer to refer to them using the FIRST and REST functions, while others like CAR and CDR because they fit well with the precomposed versions such as (CADR x) ≡ (CAR (CDR x)). The joke is ...


25

There are two things of concern here: precedence and fixity. As sepp2k mentioned, this question on Stack Overflow explains the precedence, thought the rules, as quoted, are not complete enough, and there were very small changes from Scala 2.7 to Scala 2.8. Differences concern mostly operators ending in =, though. As for fixity, almost everything in Scala is ...


24

(conj collection item) adds item to collection. To do that, it needs to realize collection. (I'll explain why below.) So the recursive call happens immediately, rather than being deferred. (cons item collection) creates a sequence which begins with item, followed by everything in collection. Significantly, it doesn't need to realize collection. So the ...


19

The best way to determine the difference between both methods is to look it the source code. The source of ::: def ::[B >: A] (x: B): List[B] = new scala.collection.immutable.::(x, this) The source of +:: override def +:[B >: A, That](elem: B)(implicit bf: CanBuildFrom[List[A], B, That]): That = bf match { case _: List.GenericCanBuildFrom[_] ...


18

Yes, definitely a geek joke. The names come from the IBM 704, but that's not the joke. The joke is (bad) pun on "my other car is a ___." But the in-joke is about recursion. When you loop/manipulate/select/invoke/more in lisp you use a combination of car (the first element in the list) and cdr (the rest of the list) to juggle functions. So you've got a ...


15

The first one is what you want. They're equivalent. You can verify like this: 1 ]=> (cons (cons 'a 'b) (cons 'c 'd)) ;Value 11: ((a . b) c . d) 1 ]=> (car (cons (cons 'a 'b) (cons 'c 'd))) ;Value 12: (a . b) 1 ]=> (cdr (cons (cons 'a 'b) (cons 'c 'd))) ;Value 13: (c . d) Remember a list is a cons cell. The "car" is the head element of the ...


15

Your mistake is that cdr[(B C)] is the list (C), not the atom C. Then car[(C)] is C.


12

There is nothing wrong with them, in the right context. If you have free-standing, stateless methods (such as those found in java.lang.Math), then a static class is the perfect place for them. The only reason they're in a class at all is because Java has no concept of free-standing methods.


12

The main disadvantage IMO is the impossibility, using most of the mocking frameworks, to mock the implementation of such utility methods in order to unit-test some class using these utility methods. For example, Using System.currentTimeMillis() is easy to get the current time. But when you have to test a class which uses the current time to do some work, ...


11

It is special syntax for lists. You can think of the list type as a discriminated union thusly: type list<'T> = // ' | Nil | Cons of 'T * list<'T> except that there's special syntax that makes Nil be [] and Cons(h,t) be h::t. Then it's just normal pattern matching on a discriminated union. Does that help? (Possibly see also ...


11

A cons cell always holds two values, called car and cdr: +-----+-----+ | car | cdr | +-----+-----+ To represent a cons cell, Lisp has the "dot notation": (car . cdr) The function cons creates such a cons cell from its two arguments: (cons 1 2) => (1 . 2) which can be thought of like this: +-----+-----+ | 1 | 2 | +-----+-----+ The values of ...


11

It is very possible to do exactly that in Racket, and in a much shorter way than done above. There are two (not-really) tricks involved: Using Racket's #%top macro makes it possible to create such bindings-out-of-thin-air. This macro is getting used implicitly around any variable reference that is unbound ("top" because these things are references to ...


11

cons returns a dotted pair, not necessarily a list. (cons 1 2) returns (1 . 2) (cons 1 null) returns (1) (cons 1 (cons 2 null)) returns (1 2)


10

//Coming from Scheme Scheme has very few data structures, one of them is a tuple: '(first . second). In this case, car is the first element, and cdr is the second. This construct can be extended to create lists, trees, and other structures. The joke isn't very funny.


10

This sounds a little bit like reductions. As to "pushing" at the end of seq: in general seqs don't have an "end", cf. (iterate inc 0). As to "pushing" at the end of a list: lists are not designed for that. Use a vector. Seed your accumulator with [], not nil. As to lazy-seq: Use "true" recursion instead of recur. Here an example: (defn integer-seq ...


10

Adding to the answer of @seanmcl, Actually OCaml supports a prefix form of (::): # (::)(1, []);; - : int list = [1] This is in the uncurried form, corresponding with the fact that all the OCaml variant constructors are not curried and cannot be partially applied. This is handled by a special parsing rule just for (::), which is why you got a rather ...


10

There is indeed a way to take advantage of laziness. In Haskell you can safely do recursive calls inside lazy data constructors, and there will be no risk of stack overflow or divergence. Placing the recursive call inside a constructor eliminates the need for an accumulator, and the order of elements in the list will also correspond to the order in which ...


9

In Clojure, unlike traditional Lisps, lists are not the primary data structures. The data structures can implement the ISeq interface - which is another view of the data structure it's given - allowing the same functions to access elements in each. (Lists already implement this. seq? checks whether something implements ISeq.(seq? '(1 2)), (seq? [1 2])) ...


9

They are not exactly the same, even though they evaluate to the same values in the REPL. Consider these examples, in which cons cells are modified destructively: TEST> (defun literal-cons () (let ((cons '(1 . 2))) (incf (cdr cons)) cons)) LITERAL-CONS TEST> (literal-cons) (1 . 3) TEST> (literal-cons) (1 . 4) TEST> ...


9

An empty list is simply the nil symbol (and symbols, by definition, are not conses). car and cdr are defined to return nil if given nil. As for list-mutation functions, they return a value that you are supposed to reassign to your variable. For example, look at the specification for the nreverse function: it may modify the given list, or not, and you are ...


8

"\r\n\r\n" ++ T is just syntax sugar for [13,10,13,10|T]. It should perform same. If not there is something wrong ;-)


7

Cons constructs a "cons cell". This has nothing to do with lists at first. A cons cell is a pair of two values. A cons cell is represented in written form by a "dotted pair", e.g. (A . B), which holds the two values 'A and 'B. The two places in a cons cell are called "car" and "cdr". You can visualize such a cons cell as a bisected block: car cdr ...


7

Just look at what you get back when you enter in a literal ((A . B) . (C . D)): * '((a . b) . (c . d)) ((A . B) C . D) There is a defined algorithm the Lisp printer uses to print out data structures built from pairs. Basically, you can't ever get a cons to be printed as a dotted pair inside parentheses when it is the CDR of another cons. However, it is ...


7

Since I'm your lecturer I, here's my answer. (Oh, and I can confirm that this isn't homework, it's related to the practice exam). The syntax [a|b|c] actually doesn't seem to be standard Prolog, and some implementations interpret it differently. (Had I known this I might not have used it.) Some interpret it as [a|[b|c]]. (As I intended.) But with SWI ...


7

No. Cons (::) is a constructor, constructors can not be infix operators. The allowed infix symbols are here: http://caml.inria.fr/pub/docs/manual-caml-light/node4.9.html Some workarounds are (as you mention) the verbose (fun x l -> x :: l) and defining your own nontraditional infix cons let (+:) x l = x :: l


7

In Lisp ((1 . 2) . (3 . 4)) and ((1 . 2) 3 . 4) are exactly the same thing. You can check by evaluating '((1 . 2) . (3 . 4)). If you think about it the 3 is the car of the cdr, so it's the second element of the improper list, so the pair (1 . 2) is the first element, 3 as second element and that has 4 instead of NIL to terminate it. They're just two ...


6

Spaces are used to separate list tokens. A.B is a single token. (A.B) is a list with a single element. (A . B) is a cons cell with A as car and B as cdr. A cons cell is a pair of "things" (objects). In your case, these things are symbols, and they are named A, B, etc.. The printed representation of such a cell is (A . B), for example. This is called ...


6

. between two characters is a part of a symbol. b.c is a symbol with a name of three characters: b, ., and c. If you enter FOO.BAR, then Lisp will read it as one symbol. If you enter (FOO.BAR) then Lisp will read it as a list with one symbol as its contents. If you enter (FOO . BAR) then Lisp will read it as a cons cell with FOO as the CAR and BAR as the ...


6

In addition to Brian's answer, there are a few points that are worth noting. The h::t syntax can be used both as an operator and as a pattern: let l = 1::2::[] // As an operator match l with x::xs -> 1 | [] -> 0 // As a pattern This means that it is a bit special construct, because other operators (for example +) cannot be used ...


6

i think there are a couple of things to learn here. first, a kind of general rule - recursive functions typically have a natural order, and adding an accumulator reverses that. you can see that because when a "normal" (without accumulator) recursive function runs, it does some work to calculate a value, then recurses to generate the tail of the list, ...



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