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15

You'll need to refactor the lines of code that call Console.ReadLine into a separate object, so you can stub it out with your own implementation in your tests. As a quick example, you could just make a class like so: public class ConsoleNameRetriever { public virtual string GetNextName() { return Console.ReadLine(); } } Then, in ...


12

Another, probably cleaner way to do this is to extend TextWriter with your own that logs to wherever you'd like it to. Note: I have not tested this. public class ListBoxWriter : TextWriter { private ListBox list; private StringBuilder content = new StringBuilder(); public ListBoxWriter(ListBox list) { this.list = list; } ...


7

You should refactor your code to remove the dependency on the console from this code. For instance, you could do this: public interface IConsole { void Write(string message); void WriteLine(string message); string ReadLine(); } and then change your code like this: public void SignInScoreBoard(int steps, IConsole console) { ... just ...


5

You can read directly from the StanadardOutput/Error for the process using all the standard Stream methods, just be sure to set the StartInfo.Redirectxxx to true. var p = new Process() p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false; //not sure if this is absolutely required p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOuput = true; .... do { Thread.Sleep(nnn); ...


3

Bit of a stumper, took me a while. I noticed that e.Data can be Nothing, never seen that before. The network utilities are, erm, special, Berkeley is an unusual place on planet Earth. You do have to add the line-ending yourself. Using InvokeRequired is pointless, it always is for the OutputDataReceived event. This version worked fine: Public Sub ...


3

Unlike Linux, all color IO is not going to be captured with simple redirecting, so the only way to capture it is to hook on WinAPI calls (i.e. you will need to intercept system calls), which require administrative privileges, fragile and suspicious.


2

Rather than try to "capture" text sent to the console, I would create a new class that handles writing the output for you. Then that new class could write to the console, as well as anyplace else you want it to go. If you're using .NET's Debug class, simply use two listeners: a ConsoleTraceListener and a TextWriterTraceListener. To make your existing code ...


2

You can use Moles to replace Console.ReadLine with your own method without having to change your code at all (designing and implementing an abstract console, with support for dependency injection is all completely unnecessary).


2

Instead of using a delegate try reading the output directly to the textbox. The StandardOutput property of the Process is a stream that you can use the ReadLineAsync method to get the output. Something like this should work: pi.CreateNoWindow = True pi.UseShellExecute = False pi.RedirectStandardOutput = True pi.RedirectStandardError = True p.StartInfo = ...


1

This worked for me process.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true; process.StartInfo.ErrorDialog = false; process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true; process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true; process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false; process.ErrorDataReceived += (sendingProcess, errorLine) => ...


1

This solution both works on Windows (7) and Windows CE Just pipe the output to REM ping localhost | REM


1

public void SignInScoreBoard(int steps, Func<String> nameProvider) { ... string name = nameProvider(); ... } In your test case, you can call it as SignInScoreBoard(val, () => "TestName"); In your normal implementation, call it as SignInScoreBoard(val, Console.ReadLine); If you're using C# 4.0, you can make Console.ReadLine ...


1

Rather than abstracting Console, I would rather create a component to encapsulate this logic, and test this component, and use it in the console application.


1

Why not create a new stream (file/memory) for both stdin and stdout, then redirect input/ouput to your new streams before calling the method? You could then check the content of the streams after the method has finished.



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