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4

To complement and elaborate on @aireties' excellent answer, there are three cases currently in Julia when you do const x = a and later do const x = b again in the same module: No warning: if a === b then a and b are programmatically indistinguishable in the sense of Henry Baker's EGAL [1, 2]: replacing a with b cannot affect the behavior of any program, so ...


4

If you are going to use something as a constant then you really don't want to be defining it multiple times (after all, that's the point of a constant) and when you run your script multiple times, that's exactly what you are doing. Also, it's not quite true that redefining constants doesn't affect your code in any way - it actually can hurt performance ...


4

You didn't quote the constant name var_dump(defined('LIBXML_DTDLOAD')); // bool(true)


4

For more complex initialization values, it is often helpful to make a function that returns the constant value to assign, like: type ROM is array (7 downto 0, 7 downto 0) of std_logic; function ROM_init return ROM is variable res_v : ROM; begin -- Write code that assigns initial value to res_v return res_v; end function; constant R : ROM := ROM_init;...


2

When you define a static var/let into a class (or struct), that information will be shared among all the instances (or values). Sharing information class Animal { static var nums = 0 init() { Animal.nums += 1 } } let dog = Animal() Animal.nums // 1 let cat = Animal() Animal.nums // 2 As you can see here, I created 2 separate ...


2

Encapsulate them. Add a class module, and make an abstraction over these. Abstract away the column numbering logic, exose Property Get accessors for your columns, and then another property with Get and Let accessors for the "mode", which determines the value returned by the properties. Public Enum SpreadsheetType A B End Enum Private columnMode As ...


2

You can make it a separate package called "constants" if you really want them to be constants. Or, since your constants aren't really constants (you're using var, not const), you could make a constants struct with the values you want. type Constants struct { FirstName string LastName string }


2

consts are compile time constants. Meaning that their value has to be assigned during compile time, unlike vals, where it can be done at runtime. This means, that consts can never be a assigned to a function or any class constructor, but only to a String or primitive. For example: const val foo = complexFunctionCall() //Not okay val fooVal = ...


2

You use named constants (and enums) in Java for at least two and probably more reasons: Constant values used in your program are given meaningful names This avoids the use of "magic numbers" in code that give future maintainers fits and cause them to curse your name forever. A value may be a constant when the program was written but might change in the ...


2

Value types in Swift are immutable. When you come to 'mutate' them, be it via changing the value of a property, or through using a mutating function – you're actually creating a copy of that value type with the mutation applied, and then assigning it back to the original variable – thus violating the let constant. You can think of changing the property on ...


2

In the variable declaration you cannot do operations. Neither concatenation nor math operations. You can do it in construct method; public static $arr = []; public function __construct(){ self::$arr = [KEY_ONE => "string " . MyClass::CONSTANT . " string"]; }


2

You cannot assign a string to a char * pointer after initialization using the conventional assignment operator. You can, however, use the strcpy function. If you declare it as just a pointer instead of an array with fixed length, you also need to allocate memory for the string: char *str = NULL; str = malloc(20); if(str == NULL) return; strcpy(str, "...


2

Is there a way to read the value "base 10" in a non constant string variable? You can use an union union fake { const char *as_const; char *as_non_const; }; union fake x; x.as_const = string_b10_e2; and then use x.as_non_const, but keep in mind that you can not modify his contents (it is still in a read only data segment)


1

Because it would require to create special case for enums for check. consider another example interface SomeInterface{} enum Values implements SomeInterface {RED}; enum MoreValues implements SomeInterface {RED}; public void dostuff2(SomeInterface value) { value = RED; } It is quite similar to your code to yours, and dostuff2 is exactly same. As under ...


1

Using Constants will gain you with maintainability, ease of development and less error prone and not performance. For instance you use the Constants.DimLink at multiple places in your code, then if in case it's value need to be changed, you need to change in just single place, making your code more maintainable and less error prone. You will also find ...


1

You cannot do that. You will need to move the definition of the enum before the definition of Bar or define it inside Bar.


1

There are some posts for how to write code for static constant and static variable in Swift. But it is not clear when to use static constant and static variable rather than constant and variable. Can someone explain? When you define a static var/let into a class (or struct), that value will be shared among all the instances (or values). static variables/...


1

As you said there are many solutions and it dependence on usage. You can store them in environment variables. dotenv gem help you handle it easier: https://github.com/bkeepers/dotenv


1

I don't know that there is "a right way" - the new 'x' configuration option system in Rails 4 seems to be the most "Railsy" solution out there. I personally think it is totally okay to have a GlobalConstants module defined in an initializer or a file in the lib directory. Put all your global constants in there and be diligent about using them throughout ...


1

The odd thing about constants in Ruby is you can define them once, but modify them endlessly unless they're frozen. The first one is a problem because you're switching which object PERSONS refers to. In the second case you're adding something to an existing object, this is allowed. Technically it's possible to redefine constants but this is best avoided.


1

A common place to put application-wide global constants is inside config/application. module MyApp FOO ||= ENV.fetch('FOO', nil) BAR ||= %w(one two three) class Application < Rails::Application config.foo_bar = :baz end end


1

This is a bit of an old question, but I thought I would contribute my 2 cents anyway since this thread came up in conversation today. This doesn't exactly answer why is there no const? but how to make your classes immutable. (Unfortunately I have not enough reputation yet to post as a comment to the accepted answer) The way to guarantee immutability on an ...


1

This way can help you SELECT TOP 3 1 AS First, 2 AS Second, 3 AS Third FROM Any_Table_In_Your_DataBase Any_Table_In_Your_DataBase: any table which contains more than 3 records, or use any system table. Here we have no concern with data of that table. You can bring variations in result set by concatenating a column with ...



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