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8

A string literal has static storage duration and lasts the life of the program. From the draft C++ standard section 2.14.5 String literals paragraph 8 which says (emphasis mine going forward): Ordinary string literals and UTF-8 string literals are also referred to as narrow string literals. A narrow string literal has type “array of n const char”, ...


7

PEP 8 was created on 05-Jul-2001, whereas these constants exist at least since 1990, as can be seen in this initial revision of math module implementation. tobias_k in his comment made a good guess IMHO, that lowercase in this case seems more natural from mathematician's point of view. Another possible reason is that Python was heavily influenced by the ABC ...


7

In theory, there should be no difference in speed or memory usage - internally, the variables work the same. In practice, letting the compiler know that something is a constant might result in better optimisations. However the most important reason is that using constants (or immutable objects) helps to prevent programmer errors. It's not by accident that ...


7

std::copy(A, A+4, a) or, by using std::array has the easy copy method you want: std::array<int, 4>A = {0, 1, 2, 3} std::array<int, 4>a = A;


6

Use instead standard class std::array. #include <array> //... const std::array<int, 4> A = { 0, 1, 2, 3 }; std::array<int, 4 > a = A;


5

Read up on the printf format specifiers on the printf man page. Code: #include <stdio.h> #define CONST 123456789 int main() { printf("%d = %#x = %#o\n", CONST, CONST, CONST); return 0; } Compile and test: $ gcc -Wall dec-hex-oct.c && ./a.out 123456789 = 0x75bcd15 = 0726746425 $


4

Declaring an object (at namespace scope) as const in C++ assigns it internal linkage by default. If you declare (and define because of the initialization) const std::string baz = "h2g2"; into a header you will have a statically linked string per each translation unit. The address would have to be stored in each translation unit (different addresses per ...


4

use php magic constant __FILE__ -- The full path and filename of the file. If used inside an include, the name of the included file is returned. Since PHP 4.0.2, __FILE__ always contains an absolute path with symlinks resolved whereas in older versions it contained relative path under some circumstances. __LINE__ -- The current line number of the file. ...


4

Instead of creating a seperate method to call for each enum value you could just override the method: public enum ShipType { SMALL{ @Override public int[][] getRegionOfShip(int[] startingPosition, Aligment aligment){ } }, MEDIUM{ @Override public int[][] getRegionOfShip(int[] startingPosition, Aligment aligment){ } }; public ...


4

The << operator is a bitwise left shift. For example, 1 << 0 translates to 1 'left shifted by' 0 bits. This is effectively a nop as 1 left shifted by 0 bits is still the value 1. To further clarify, let's look at a bitwise representation of a number (lets say the number is a 16 bit value to illustrate) 1 -> 0b'0000000000000001 1 << 1 ...


4

It's a very common idiom for treating a single integer value as a collection of individual bits. C doesn't have direct support for bit arrays, so we use bitwise operators to set and clear the bits. The << operator is a left-shift operator. For example: 1 << 0 == 1 1 << 1 == 2 1 << 2 == 4 1 << 3 == 8 1 << n for any ...


3

The consts do not know about the other global consts because they are not initialized at this point. What you could do though is to use computed properties: class ViewController: UIViewController { var screenRect: CGRect { return UIScreen.mainScreen().bounds } var screenWidth: CGFloat { return self.screenRect.origin.x } } This only works with vars, ...


3

Expressions in property declarations are not (yet) supported by PHP. Some expressions will be allowed from PHP 5.6 onwards. You can read more about it on PHP's wiki. Your specific example should work in PHP 5.6.


3

You don't have to (and should not) free this string. You should only have to free things that you have used malloc, realloc, or calloc (as mentioned by sharth in the comments) on.


3

Here you go: enum PaymentType { CREDIT_CUSTOMER, CASH_CUSTOMER; } enum PaymentMethod { CREDIT_CARD, VISA_CARD, MASTER_CARD; } Use it like: PaymentMethod meth = PaymentMethod.VISA_CARD; etc.


2

To get all Constants you can use following code - HashMap<String,String> pairs= new HashMap<String,String>(); Constants constants= new Constants(); Field[] f = constants.getClass().getFields(); for (int i = 0; i < f.length; i++) { pairs.put(f[i].getName().toLowerCase(),f[i].get(constants).toString()); } ...


2

As you recognized if else-if blocks should usually be avoided as they make for difficult to read code and add unwanted dependency's. in this case, why not put all your constants in a list or some other sort of container? then you can loop over the list using Validate.CheckPhrase(str, list[index])


2

#ifdef means "if defined - some value or macro" which is always true because IS_IPAD is defined. There is also an #if macro (for example, #if __IPHONE_OS_VERSION_MAX_ALLOWED >= 30200) but it is not suitable for your case because UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() will be evaluated at runtime, so you need to use a regular if statement. if (IS_IPAD) { // ... } ...


2

You need to define variable $test inside the constructor like this: class yourClass{ private $test; function __construct(){ const USERNAME_MIN_LENGTH = '2'; $this->test = 'Max. username length is ' . USERNAME_MIN_LENGTH; } } This only works in PHP 5.6: private $test = 'Max. username length is ' . USERNAME_MIN_LENGTH;


2

Its not possible to access self before initialisation process gets completed, therefore its giving error.


2

You may try like this: select cast('20010528 08:47:00.000'as DateTime) as DateField


2

In your particular case the using enums is classic solution. First, let's re-write your Constants as an enum: public enum Constants { ACCOUNT, EVENT_ITEM, ; } public enum Operation { MULTIPLIER_ONE { public int action(int value) { return value; } }, MULTIPLIER_NEGATIVE_ONE { public int action(int ...


2

It might be a good idea to use properties file. Java Properties config.properties ball = /assets/sprites/ball.png user = /assets/sprites/user.png To read these values, at the game startup, do following FileHandle propertiesFileHandle = Gdx.files .internal(PROPERTIES_FILE_PATH); PROPERTIES = new Properties(); try { PROPERTIES.load(new ...


2

As simple as this: insert MTBUR_Type_Stage(EndingDate,EndingQuarter) values (@EndDate,1) ; or this insert MTBUR_Type_Stage(EndingDate,EndingQuarter) select @EndDate,1 Expanded for more fields: insert MTBUR_Type_Stage( [Type], [Hours], [Part No], [UnscheduledRemovals], [MTBUR], [EndingDate], [EndingQuarter] [int] NULL ) ...


2

You can use companion objects with case classes. If you declare an object with the same name in the same compilation unit (usually the same file) it will be treated as the case class's companion object and have the usual case class companion object methods, e.g. unapply, added to it. The other option is to declare DefaultEncoding as a def. Because field ...


2

Writing a custom companion object for a case class won't prevent the compiler from providing the default helper methods for the case class. trait Expression trait UnaryExpression extends Expression trait LengthExpression extends Expression trait Typ case object StringType extends Typ case class Literal(val encoding: String, val typ: Typ) extends ...


2

Ruby code cannot be created by concatenation of string. You might like to declare css_normal_price_extract as a lamba 'css_normal_price_extract' => ->(val) {val[0].attr('data-price')} price = STORES[:zara]['css_normal_price_extract'].call(page.css(STORES[:zara]['normal_price_css']))


1

I'm a bit curious why people tend to use the base classes to access those variables, since sometimes we don't know for sure in which classes is the value defined, and more importantly, it is possible that the child classes may override the values defined in base classes. Sure, but both of these scenarios are hideously bad code and you want to ...


1

I think you need to step back and think about if the string needs to be defined as a const. Clearly the string isn't a constant since you are trying to assign a new value to it - and that is not possible since you specifically instructed the compiler to make sure the value wasn't changed by using the const keyword. If the string resides as a property in a ...


1

You are correct, it's impossible to register both foo and bar as constants. Also for using a provider as a workaround, you almost got it right except that you have to store data in a provider instance: var app = angular.module('myApp', []); app.constant('foo', { message: 'Hello' }); app.provider('bar', ['foo', function(foo) { this.data = { ...



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