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13

Constraint programming (CP) Sudoku is a typical constraint programming problem. You have a set of variables (the fields in the grid) each with a domain (here the digits 0 to 9) and a set of constraints over these variables (the fact that a number occurs only once in a row, column, block,...). A generic way to solve constraint programming problems is arc ...


7

This problem is studied under the name Social Golfer Problem. The literature has nontrivial size, but there are three main approaches: Local search methods, which can handle the cases where many pairs are not present. Complete search methods like your reduction to exact cover. From what I remember, the research here revolves around efficient methods for ...


6

This question is probably more mathematical than progamming. I haven't found the final answer yet, but at least some ideas are here: We can re-state the problem in the following way. Problem A: Fix positive integers m and n. Let S be the set of n-dimensional vectors whose entries are 0 or 1. Does there exist any m by n matrix M whose entries are 0 or 1, ...


5

Check out the clpfd constraint global_cardinality/2. For example, using SICStus Prolog or SWI: :- use_module(library(clpfd)). ten_cells(Ls) :- numlist(0, 9, Nums), pairs_keys_values(Pairs, Nums, Ls), global_cardinality(Ls, Pairs). Sample query and its result: ?- time((ten_cells(Ls), labeling([ff], Ls))). 1,359,367 inferences, ...


5

ES6 (Javascript) solution With lots of ES6 generators and a little bit of lodash. You will need Babel to run this. var _ = require('lodash'); function canBe(house, criteria) { for (const key of Object.keys(criteria)) if (house[key] && house[key] !== criteria[key]) return false; return true; } function* ...


4

It would help a little if you also give a positive example, not just a negative. I might have missed something in the requirement/definitions, but here is a way of doing it in the Constraint Programming (CP) system MiniZinc (http://minizinc.org/). It don't use any specific constraints unique to CP systems - except perhaps for the function syntax, so it ...


4

As far as I know there is no straightforward algorithm to solve this specific problem more efficiently than using a backtracking approach. You can however do this more intelligently than simply enumerating over all possible solutions. An efficient way to do this is Constraint Programming (CP) (or derived paradigms like Constraint Logic Programming (CLP)). ...


4

The mod/2 operation in (T*100 + W*10 + O*1) mod 2 #= 0 isn't supported. You can rewrite the line as T*100 + W*10 + O*1 #= 2*_ which says that the left hand side expression is equal to twice an anonymous integer variable, and thus a multiple of two.


3

Oh, I just love it when these little optimisation problems pop up. They always remind me of that one time in my very first year when I built a thing that would solve Sudoku's and had a ton of fun with it! You may guess how many sudoku's I've solved ever since :). Now, your problem is an ILP (Integer Linear Program). Even before you read up on that ...


3

i think using Boolean matrix multiplication will allow you to solve the Mv=0 problem with only 1's & 0's more efficiently. Using this method you should be able to solve without worrying about rank deficiencies due to the RHS equaling zero. Here is a link to documentation on some algorithms for using BMM: ...


3

Looks like that is broken. Here is a DIY approach for your specific model: # first problem rc<-solve(lp_model) sols<-list() obj0<-get.objective(lp_model) # find more solutions while(TRUE) { sol <- round(get.variables(lp_model)) sols <- c(sols,list(sol)) add.constraint(lp_model,2*sol-1,"<=", sum(sol)-1) rc<-solve(lp_model) ...


3

CLP(FD) rules... solving this puzzle in plain Prolog is not easy... ten_digit(Xs):- length(Xs, 10), assign(Xs, Xs, 0). assign([], _, 10). assign([X|Xs], L, P) :- member(X, [9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0]), count(L, P, X), Q is P+1, assign(Xs, L, Q), count(L, P, X). count(L, P, 0) :- maplist(\==(P), L). count([P|Xs], P, C) :- C > ...


3

You can formulate the whole problem in terms of finite-domain constraints and then solve it with a standard search routine. There is no need to pre-compute lists of individual rectangle placements. In case this is homework, let me just give some recommendations. I would start by defining a number of auxiliary predicates like ...


3

The problem is that when you "add variables", the values are looked up with the lambda functions are called, not when they are defined. In this case, I'm guessing they don't get called until problem.getSolutions() which means that the value of x will be 2 in each of your function calls (instead of 0, 1 and 2 respectively as in the initial code). This is a ...


2

It would be good if you would also post your final goal (what does a solved constraint actually mean). However, it seems to me that you want to know the set of possible values for each variable at a given statement. In that case you will need an interval constraint solver The distinction between integer and rational intervals depends on your use case and ...


2

This is called the Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP), probably with time windows (VRPTW). In normal VRPTW, a customer has 1 location (and a service duration). In this VRPTW, a bustrip (= the customer in original VRPTW) has a different arrival and departure point (and a long service duration), so you're basically planning the routes between the busstrips (= ...


2

You can flatten the list with append(Trains, FlatTrains) and then constrain the domain of FlatTrains FlatTrains ins 1..9


2

In this previous answer we utilized the SICStus Prolog clpfd predicate global_cardinality/2. As an non-constraint alternative, we could also use selectd/3 like this: multi_selectd_rest([],Ds,Ds). multi_selectd_rest([Z|Zs],Ds0,Ds) :- selectd(Z,Ds0,Ds1), multi_selectd_rest(Zs,Ds1,Ds). Putting it to good use in limited_repetitions__selectd/3 we ...


2

Here's a model that seems to be correct. However, it don't use "cumulative" at all since I wanted to visualize as much as possible (see below). The main idea is that - for each time step, 1..max_step - each machine must have only tasks <= 32 GB. The foreach loop checks - for each machine - that the sum of memory of each task that is active at that time ...


2

You can use ArrayUtils.getColumn(matrix, colIndex); Best, Jean-Guillaume Fages www.cosling.com


2

It seems from your questions that you have not tried yet to implement and test your model so we cannot help much. Anyway: Q1) I did not understand clearly your approach but there may be many ways to go. It is by testing it that you will know whether it solves your problem or not. Maybe you could also use and integer variable x where x=k means task x is done ...


2

Below is another Constraint Programming model, using a similar approach as Willem Van Onsem's solution, i.e. using the global constraint "all_different", which is an efficient method to ensure that the numbers in the matrix are assigned only once. (The concept of "global constraints" is very important in CP and there is much research finding fast ...


2

I would start with writing down in math what you want. Not sure if this is helpful, but here is my implementation, solving it as a mathematical programming problem. It is not using Constraint Programming but things can look similar to what you would do in Choco: I try to maximize the minimum number of games of a player, so we don't have someone playing ...


2

Actually, my original formulation wasn't very good. This is better as a set cover. import pulp # Input data A = [ [2, 1, 0, 0], [2, 0, 0, 0], [2, 1, 2, 2], [1, 2, 2, 2], [2, 1, 1, 0] ] # Preprocess the data a bit. # Bikj = 1 if Aij != Akj, 0 otherwise B = [] for i in range(len(A)): Bi = [] for k in range(len(A)): Bik = ...


2

There are at least three constraints that can be used for this: global_cardinality count and perhaps all_different_except_0 See https://www.minizinc.org/2.0/doc-lib/doc-globals.html for a list of the global constraints supported in MiniZinc 2. The counting constraints are here: https://www.minizinc.org/2.0/doc-lib/doc-globals-counting.html An example of ...


2

The call to propagate_impl will return an ExecStatus that is not checked. Not checking the result means that any failure or subsumption reported in propagate_impl will be discarded. Surrounding the call with GECODE_ES_CHECK will check for those cases and return appropriately. This is a clear error, I have not checked if there are any more issues. A few ...


1

MiniZinc is an excelent starting point. If you are interested in more languages I suggest to study Choco and JaCoP, both can be used as Java libraries, and both have very active communities.


1

Absolutely, Choco Solver is a powerful Java constraint solver that is often used for scheduling and planning. Let's take the following example: "it would be nice if x = 10" You can encode preferences in different ways. 1) through variables and constraints. 1.1) reify the constraint with a binary variables ICF.arithm(x,"=",10).reifyWith(b); it ...


1

In this answer we use clpfd and a little lambda: :- use_module([library(clpfd), library(lambda)]). Based on meta-predicate maplist/4 and the constraints (ins)/2 and sum/3 we define: zs_selection_len_sum(Zs, Bs, L, S) :- same_length(Zs, Bs), Bs ins 0..1, maplist(\Z^B^X^(X #= Z*B), Zs, Bs, Xs), sum(Bs, #=, L), sum(Xs, #=, S). ...


1

Line 16 is mutable set difference: Remove (X,c) from the set TDA. Line 17 is set builder notation: Set ND X (which I believe means something like "New domain of X") to the set of all elements x where x is in the domain of X and there also exists a set of equal pairs that's an element of set c and that includes X=x, Y1=y1 up through Y_k=y_k where these pairs ...



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