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7

Because pass by value requires a copy constructor in the first place. So to avoid infinite recursion, the pass by reference copy constructor has to be defined before the pass by value version if we really want to have a pass by value one. As it does not make much sense to have a pass by value copy constructor, the standard forbids it.


7

mFooA = new FooA[12]; --> you are creating an Array which can hold 12 FooA instances. You have not created a FooA instance like this : new FooA()


6

Your compiler is not in C++11 mode. The {...} initializer syntax is new in C++11. Please see this question for enabling C++11 support in CodeBlocks. The other option is to use C++03 syntax, but if this book is using C++11, you'll probably need to turn it on eventually. The C++03 syntax would be: Book ...


5

You want to use smart pointers: class Object { std::unique_ptr<A> a; std::unique_ptr<B> b; public: Object() : a(make_unique<A>()), b(make_unique<B>()) {} }


5

For me works MooseX::StrictConstructor: package Shoe; use Moose; use MooseX::StrictConstructor; # <-- that's all what need has 'size' => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Num'); has 'color' => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Str'); 1; package main; my $sneaker = Shoe->new(size => 11, colour => 'white'); #blows up


5

You are simply not allowed to pass it by value - §12.8 [class.copy]/p6 of the standard explicitly prohibits it : A declaration of a constructor for a class X is ill-formed if its first parameter is of type (optionally cv-qualified) X and either there are no other parameters or else all other parameters have default arguments. A member function ...


4

Use the constructor initialization list: class primary { public: primary(int a, int b, int c) : one(a), two(b), three(c) {} private: secondary_one one; secondary_two two; secondary_three three; };


4

new FooA[12]; doesn't create and initialize instance of FooA class, but array for 12 instances of FooA. Also this array is not filled with new instances of FooA automatically (so it constructor is not invoked) but with nulls. Few of the reasons this design decision was made is that in case of many constructors compiler can't know which one to use in case ...


3

Because std::vector::push_back is defined as void push_back (const value_type& val); void push_back (value_type&& val); For an lvalue like hocSinh, the std::vector::push_back template would use the first one. Inside std::vector::push_back implementation, a copy constructor is used to construct the object in the memory segment allocated by ...


3

GCC currently doesn't support C++14's version of constexpr, so even with -std=c++14 you still get C++11's constexpr. The C++11 restriction on the body of constexpr constructors is (§7.1.5 [dcl.constexpr]/p4): the compound-statement of its function-body shall contain only null statements, static_assert-declarations typedef declarations and ...


2

Quoting the standard (§8.5/14): The form of initialization (using parentheses or =) is generally insignificant, but does matter when the initializer or the entity being initialized has a class type; see below. So in your case, there is no difference (the "see below" refers to the differentiation between copy-initialization and ...


2

As pointed out in the comments, the signatures don't match. Also, if you just want to store the passed values, there's no need to use new. You could do Person::Person(int h, int a) { this->height = h; this->age = a; } or, a bit shorter: Person::Person(int h, int a) : height(h), age(a) {}


2

A user-defined ctor without arguments, without ctor-init-list and with an empty body behaves nearly the same as the default-ctor. There is one difference though, it does not count as a trivial ctor, ever! Explicitly defaulting like this instead would avoid that difference and the concomittant potential performance-degradation: Foo() = default; // Needs ...


2

because it uses fields injection instead your Person(String name, String address, int age) constructor. Please try something like: ... <property name="person"> <bean class="com.andrew.SpringInnerBeans.Person"> <constructor-arg index="0" value="Andrew"/> <constructor-arg index="1" value="Address"/> ...


2

Firstly I fixed your code because it is a C++ question, so it has to be written as C++. A constructor might fail with exceptions other than bad_alloc. Your options are there: Do not store pointers but store the objects. These are constructed automatically (or via the initialiser list) and yes will automatically be cleaned up if created. This can be better ...


2

This is not possible, use an Init method after the constructor: abstract class SomeBase { private SomeObject _obj { get; set; } public SomeObject obj { get { // check _obj is inited: if (_obj == null) throw new <exception of your choice> ; return _obj; } ...


2

Well look again at what you are asking from the Spring container point of view. found a bean of class Customer, with only properties : ok create it as new Customer() using the no-arg constructor and keep it for the moment. found a bean of class Person with only properties : ok create it as new Person(), still using the no-arg constructor, give it an ...


1

It is an issue with the XML file setup. You are not providing constructor arguments, but rather telling Spring to instantiate a new object with certain properties. See this stack overflow post: Does Spring require all beans to have a default constructor? You have to provide the constructor arguments in order to inform Spring that you want to use the ...


1

For the goal that class B should be the only one able to instantiate and destroy objects of class A: For static and automatic variable, restricting access to the constructor is all that's needed, and you're already doing that. For dynamically allocated object you can restrict access to its deallocation functions, operator delete, and operator delete[], and ...


1

Use a mediator-class: class mediator; class A { /* Only for B via mediator */ A(); ~A(); // But how can I get class B to have access to this? friend class mediator; /* Past this line the official interface */ public: void somePrivateFunction(); protected: private: }; class B; class mediator { static A* createA() { return new A{}; } ...


1

You have to supply parameters to your constructor: public function __construct($_f, $_l, $_a) { $this->firstname = $_f; $this->lastname = $_a; $this->age = $_a; } More in the documentation.


1

Actually, the destructor should not be called for tst at the end of the program. According to the latest standard the main program variables are implicitly saved. Therefore, it should only call the destructor for the function result on rhs and for the tst when it is being overwritten in the assignment.


1

Pointers is definitely the way to go. The best mehod I have found is to use EventBus to pass whole ParseObjects, you will find an example in my answer to this question: Getting Parse Object ID from onListItemClick It is really simple and saves you the trouble of doing extra queries to locate the passed object.


1

In Java all user defined types are instantiated when you call new MyClass() In your code, when you call mFooA = new FooA[12]; what you are really doing, is instantiating an array which can hold 12 references to FooA objects that live somewhere on the heap, but you haven't actually instantiated any FooA objects yet. To do that you would have to do something ...


1

How is the Replaces property diclared in your XSD? Probably it's a required element, and the tool generates an instance to comply with the contract. You could then try to change the definition, making it optional. If it's something like: <xs:element name="Replaces" type="ApproverType" use="required" /> You then have to change it to: ...


1

Your Date class outputs "Fatal Error" everywhere in an non-informative way (which we had no idea of until you posted your Date class code). The first time you get Fatal Error is inside the setDate method because dateOK returned false for "Jan", 1, 1000. Your monthOK method is expecting "January", so the "Jan" you're using for your default constructor is ...


1

Since B inherits A, it has to include a call to A's constructor, called the base contructor. class B : A { public B (int k, int l) : base(k, l) { } } This calls the code in A's constructor, populating x and y with the values in k and l.


1

You have to make this initializer required: override init(frame: CGRect) { super.init(frame: frame) } Tested with this code in a playground and it works: class AbstractUIWidget : UIView { required override init(frame: CGRect) { super.init(frame: frame) } required override init() { super.init() } required ...


1

You can store that constructor parameter in class field or property and later access it. public interface IParameterizedClass { string ClassParameter {get} } public class class1 : IParameterizedClass { public string ClassParameter {get; private set;} public class1(string someParameter) { // do some work ClassParameter = ...


1

First of all, if you do not write a constructor, an empty constructor is autogenerated by the compiler. If you do not want the constructor to be called, make it privte like this private BasicMapState() { } If you do not want to make an object from this Class, you can work with static variables, otherwise you have to call the constructor from any public ...



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