Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Initializing the member in the initializer list value-initializes it. Omitting it from the list default-initializes it, If B is a non-aggregate and has a default constructor, there is no difference. If B is an aggregate, then there may be a difference. default-initializing it means if it contains built-ins these may not get initialized. value-initializing ...


14

By including it in the initialiser list, the member is value-initialised. If it weren't, it would be default-initialised. Whether there's a difference depends on the type. If it's a class type with a declared default constructor, then there's no difference: that constructor will be used in either case. Otherwise, value-initialisation will zero-initialise ...


8

Can C++ handle this case? Short answer: no. typedefs are aliases for types. So type_a and type_b are the same type: int. Which means you are trying to do this: class Test { public: explicit Test(int a) {} explicit Test(int b) {} }; Since it isn't clear why you want this, it is hard to suggest possible solutions. But if you were to implement a ...


5

What you have there is undefined behavior. You assign line2 = line1 but have no user-defined assignment operator, so you use the default one provided by the compiler. And the default one simply copies all the fields, which in your case includes an int*. That gives you two copies of the same int*, leaks the value that line2 previously pointed to, and ...


5

I suspect you want to change Map<String,InterfaceA> to Map<String, ? extends InterfaceA> in the ClassA constructor signature (and field). Otherwise a HashMap<String, ImplmntsInterfaceA> really isn't a valid argument for it. Consider what operations are valid on a Map<String,InterfaceA> - you could write: map.put("foo", new ...


4

You can use: var constructor = type.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes); p.SetValue(this, constructor.Invoke()); Or: p.SetValue(this, Activator.CreateInstance(type)); Note that I have replaced first parameter to this since the SetValue method expects an instance of your object not the PropertyInfo


4

If you call super in a subclass, the superclass constructor will run (and thus create an object of that class??) then how come you can accually call super in a subclass of an abstract class? This part is wrong. When you call super in the subclass constructor, you're just telling to the subclass that it first has to execute the initialization code from ...


3

TL;DR Problem is that implicitValue from SubClass is used by superclass implicit SuperClass constructor (super()) via implicitValue() method, before subClassValue = 20; will be executed in SubClass constructor, so it returns default value of subClassValue which for int field is 0. Does the SubClass constructor make use of the SuperClass constructor? ...


3

It's not the MyInteger(s) that's the problem. It constructs that temporary object. It's the attempt to return this temporary object that is the problem. You are returning by value, which means that a copy needs to be made, yet your copy constructor takes a MyInteger&, which is unable to bind to temporary objects (rvalues). Your copy constructor should ...


3

Your code contains a single constructor with package level (default) permissions, CalculatorEngine(Calculator parent){ this.parent = parent; } So you don't get the default constructor and you can't call the constructor that takes a Calculator anywhere but the same package (or a sub-class). Add an empty public constructor (or remove your existing one ...


3

The reason is that you are using the second constructor definition for both cases A(int y,int z) : b(y),c(z) { } The constructor call A obj(1,2.3); // ^ Has a double parameter, that will be converted to 2 automatically. a is left uninitialized in both cases.


3

In both cases, you call constructor A(int y,int z) You may be doing that inadvertently in the case of obj, but the end result is that the code doesn't initialize A::a in either case. When you access obj.a or obj2.a you invoke undefined behaviour. You can't expect any particular outcome from your program.


3

In a situation like this, writing your own copy constructor, assignment operator and destructor should be your last resort, not your first reaction. Your first reaction should usually be to use some pre-defined class that already handles these chores for you. In this case, changing from a raw pointer to a shared_ptr (for only one possibility) cleans up the ...


3

Yes, you can inherit from A and call the base constructor: class B : A { public B(ref int value): base(ref value) { } } But to be honest, it's the first time I see a constructor with ref/out parameters. Those parameters are used when the method is performing some calculations and modifying the value of the parameter which is not what a ...


2

Given what mike and juan have said, I'd say that class B's implementation is broken iff it requires to be value-initialized like that unless it'd be reasonably expected to behave that way. Generally, given a properly designed class - with a user-provided default constructor iff if has POD members - there should be no difference in behavior between value- ...


2

if not valid delete the object Don't. Better, test the email address to be valid before trying to create the user. or return nothing You can't really. Returning nothing from a constructor is effectively quite impossible, except you throw an exception. Use an extra factory function instead: function isValidEmail(str) { // ...


2

This: #include "item.h" #include "item.cpp" // <-- is wrong. You only include header files. The way you get your definitions in is you compile item.cpp and then compile main.cpp and then link them together.


2

Your non-virtual functions "work" (a relative term) because they need no vtable lookup. Under the hood is implementation-dependent, but consider what is needed to execute a non-virtual member. You need a function pointer, and a this. The latter is obvious, but where does the fn-ptr come from? its just a plain function call (expecting a this, then any ...


2

You have declared x and y to be pointers to objects of struct node, but you didn't create the objects. The simplest solution would be to change your declarations from node* x; node* y; to: node x; node y; which would create automatic node vars, and would allow you to access the array elements like so: x.a[0] = 1; You could alternatively create ...


2

One option you have is to wrap the parameters with a template type that includes a 'domain': template <typename Type, typename Domain> class TypeWrapper { public: TypeWrapper(Type); operator Type (); }; typedef int type_a; typedef int type_b; typedef TypeWrapper<type_a, class type_a_domain> type_a_wrapper; typedef TypeWrapper<type_b, ...


2

You're ignoring the NazwaPliku argument, instead hardcoding "Test.txt". Instead: Plansza::Plansza(char* NazwaPliku){ FILE * plik; plik= fopen(NazwaPliku, "r"); fclose(plik); }; If you want to access the file later, you need to store it in a field in the object. You already have ekran, szer and wys, so presumably you know how to do that. (Now ...


2

If no user-defined copy assignment operators are provided for a class type (struct, class, or union), the compiler will always declare one as an inline public member of the class. This implicitly-declared copy assignment operator has the form T& T::operator=(const T&) if all of the following is true: Each direct base B of T has a copy assignment ...


2

Nothing at all, other than the constructor function being "named". For #1, Person.name would evaluate to an empty string, and for #2, Person.name would evaluate to "Person".


2

Calling a constructor in an abstract class would only be used to setup attributes that are specific to that abstract class - which would otherwise be tedious to setup in each implementation of the abstract class. This ability removes boiler plate code. In the example below, see how determining the lifetime of the car could be calculated based on other ...


2

titl=ui->title->toPlainText().toLatin1().data(); This is probably the issue: toLatin1() returns a new QByteArray which owns its data. You assign the internal data pointer of that QByteArray to titl. However, the QByteArray is only a temporary variable and will get destroyed in the next line of code. When the QByteArray gets destroyed, it will free ...


2

As seen in the following article https://blog.engineyard.com/2015/mastering-this-in-javascript and following discussion in comments, a possible solution would be to store this in a variable higher in the scope to use it in the callback. Therefore a possible solution could be : Library.Module = function () { var _this = this; _this.resources = ...


1

The difference between .call and .apply is that .call takes its arguments as separate arguments for the function, while .apply takes the arguments as a single array. For example: function myFunction(x, y) { var z; // Do something return z; } var context = {}; // The following function calls are equivalent: var fx = myFunction.call(context, 5, ...


1

I'd recommmend to use the Function constructor instead of eval (though you could do the same with an evaled IEFE). That way, you get a "module" scope for free don't collide with the scopes of the loader function can pass arguments with arbitrary names (new Function("exports", ressourceCode))(ressourceObject);


1

Suggest you to read this http://thbecker.net/articles/rvalue_references/section_05.html it'll will tell you why. In a short, c++ regards parameter other in ReaderValue as a lvalue, but the parameter other in moveAlloc is a rvalue. So you have to convert other in ReaderValue to a rvalue when you call moveAlloc.


1

ReaderValue::ReaderValue(ReaderValue && other) { //other here is a lvalue(has a name) referring to a rvalue //move alloc however takes a rvalue moveAlloc(other); } that is why you have to cast your lvalue to a rvalue explicitely moveAlloc(std::move(other)); //other now is a rvalue please note that all std::move does is effectively a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible