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7

You can pass both single items and arrays using the params constructor, you don't need two constructors. using System; public class Cell { public Cell(int x) {} } public class Cells { public Cells(params Cell[] cells) { Console.WriteLine("Called with " + cells.Length.ToString() + " elements"); } } namespace Rextester { public class Program ...


5

Why does it work the opposite in constructors, the constructor of subclass has to throw the same exception or wider, Any reasonable explanation for this? A subclass constructor always invokes its parent constructor with a call to super(..). In this case, the parent constructor is declared as throwing a checked exception of type MyException. Your ...


5

The problem is not the string. The const char[7] would be successfully used to construct the temporary std::strings. The problem is you are trying to bind int literals to references-to-non-const; you cannot do that. Accepting const int& into your constructor would fix your program. However, I recommend changing your constructor to take its ints by ...


4

static constructors are meant to run only once. You are not going to change that. The best solution is, as you stated, to create an instance of your class and put that code that needs to be ran again in the constructor. It seems to me though that certificate checks need to be done once, since the certificate won't change in a few seconds.


4

Unfortunately there is no simpler way to initialize instance variable - you have to write such initialization code in a constructor. However all modern IDE (like IntelliJ IDEA, Eclipse, etc.) can generate such constructors automatically based on instance variables, so you don't have to write such code manually. (For instance in IntelliJ IDEA press ...


4

Your guess is correct, this(0) is calling the BankAccount(decmial) constructor. The reason you might create two is to give the consumer of your class a choice. If they have a value they can use the BackAccount(decimal) constructor, if they don't care they can save themselves a few seconds by using the BankAccount() constructor and it will initialize the ...


4

The problem for both your constructors is that you have put a return type of void. You cannot have a return type on constructors. That is why the constructor is not found and compiler thinks there is only a default constructor.


3

You likely use the wrong structure : your city is not a county, your county is not a state. You should use composition instead of derivation class State(object): def __init__(self, **kwargs): self.__dict__.update(kwargs) def state_name(self): return self.state class County(object): def __init__(self, state, **kwargs): self.state=state # ...


3

When you add your own __init__() here, you are overriding the __init__() in the superclass. However, the superclass often (as in this case) has some stuff it needs in its __init__(). Therefore, you either have to re-create that functionality (e.g. initializing _popen as described in your error, among other things), or call the superclass constructor within ...


3

Every time you call the method, this line will execute: Sale sale1 = new Sale(); ... And a brand-new object will be created, it doesn't matter at all that the same variable name is used - a new object will be allocated, the fact that the same name is reused is irrelevant; an object is not defined by its name. Now you only have to return it at the end: ...


3

Please see this article. There it's clearly explained what could happen when you let this escape. And here is a follow-up with further explanations. It's Heinz Kabutz amazing newsletter, where this and other very interesting topics are discussed. I highly recommend it. Here is the sample taken from the links, which show how the this reference escapes: ...


3

You don't need to, because Java compiler will already give you an error during compile-time. It is Strong typed, meaning that a variable will only have one type and ONE TYPE ONLY. The code you gave will not compile


3

I'll modify the example a bit, to make it more clear. Consider this class: public class ThisEscape { Object someThing; public ThisEscape(EventSource source) { source.registerListener( new EventListener() { public void onEvent(Event e) { doSomething(e, someThing); } ...


3

What you have is far more complex than necessary. All you need to do is keep track of the current position, and return true when it goes past the threshold. struct deterministic_sample { double sampRate; double position; deterministic_sample() : sampRate(0.1), position(0.0) { } void deterministic_rate( double rate ) { ...


3

In the context here, it means "when the constructor public BankAccount() is called, execute the other constructor, matching the signature. The 0 matches public BankAccount(decimal initialBalance), causing that constructor to be called as well. The keyword this can be applied in other context as well, but it always refers to the current instance of the ...


2

No A static constructor can only be called once and is intended only for initialization, not for logic (such as authentication)


2

In JavaScript, all normally-created functions have a prototype property which is, initially, an object created by the JavaScript engine with one property: constructor, which refers back to the function. So for function A() { } ...we know that, initially, A.prototype.constructor === A. This also means that objects created via new A will inherit ...


2

The key point here is that it is often easy to forget that an in-lined anonymous object still has a reference to its parent object and that's how this code fragment is exposing a not-yet-completely-initialised instance of itself. Imagine EventSource.registerListener immediately calls EventLister.doSomething()! That doSomething will be called on an object ...


2

A new Sale object is created every time new Sale() is called. public Sale newSale(){ Sale sale1 = new Sale(); return sale1; } You can test it with: if(newSale() == newSale()){ System.out.println("It's the same object!"); } else { System.out.println("They are distinct objects"); }


2

Firstly, if you give wrong parameters to constructor, java compiler will return an error. Answering your second question it is acceptable to use while loop inside the constructor.


2

This is actually straight forward, if it was like A B A B A B, then you would have trouble if you wanted to access b from the constructor of B, since the order you thought implies that first member a gets instantiated, then ctor runs, then b gets initialized. In reality, every member is instantiated (constructed etc.) first, then, the constructors are ...


2

Typically having an initialize method require a whole bunch of arguments usually leads to the use of an options hash rather than splat. With an options hash you're able to dry up your initialize method, set instance variables and attr_readers in a very ruby way: class Animal def initialize(opts = {}) options = defaults.merge(opts) options.each ...


2

Well, you don't have a _popen in your class. If _popen was declared at the class level or was a function in mp.Process, then your code would work because it would grab it off the Process namespace. class Process(object): _popen = None def __init__(...): #stuff, but not involving _popen The assert looks like a guard however and I'll ...


2

There is really no magic to pass values from outside to base class constructor - derived class must somehow specify all arguments to base constructor either passing directly or computing in some other way. Usually you'd compute parameters of base constructor from arguments and some constant values: public C(int w, int x, string y, string z) : ...


2

No there is not, but you should refer to the builder approach since there are a lot of parameters / arguments to the constructor in there. The builder would make the object creation readable, less error prone and assists in thread safety as well. Take a look at When would you use the Builder Pattern? for details and samples.


2

As an expression, ref is an lvalue, as is any expression that names a variable of any type. So it will bind to an lvalue reference (for the copy constructor), but not an rvalue reference (for the move constructor). Using std::move (or an equivalent cast expression) gives an rvalue expression that denotes to the object. This will bind to an rvalue reference, ...


2

JLabel enterYourBalance = new JLabel("Current Balance:"); JTextField textBoxToEnterBalance = new JTextField(0); ... int balance = Integer.parseInt(enterYourBalance.getText().trim());` enterYourBalance.getText().trim() will return "Current Balance:" and parsing it to int fails. Change to textBoxToEnterBalance.getText().trim() to get the text from the text ...


2

It means that the constructor calls another constructor of the same class. Which constructor is called depends on int signature. In this case this(0) will call the only matching constructor, BankAccount(decimal initialBalance), since 0 can be passed as decimal.


2

The parameter, w, of function doSomeWork is a Widget that you have created as a parameter in the line doSomeWork(Widget(15)); doSomeWork expected a Widget and one has been explicitly supplied using the constructor you have listed. No compiler supplied copy constructor is used because the doSomeWork(const Widget &w) signature uses pass by reference ...


1

You should set the context when you call the function: privateInitFunc.call(this)



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