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7

In Java, the constructor is not a method. It only has the name of the class and a specific visibility. If it declares that returns something, then it is not a constructor, not even if it declares that returns a void. Note the difference here: public class SomeClass { public SomeClass() { //constructor } public void SomeClass() { ...


6

It is because you cannot call a constructor like this : Window::Window(const char* title, int x, int y, int width, int height) { string t(title); Window(t, width, height, x, y); // this create a temporary Window then destroy it } Instead do this : Window::Window(const char* title, int x, int y, int width, int height) : Window( string(t), width, ...


5

When you define your own constructor,the compiler does not provide a no-argument constructor for you. When you define a class with no constructor,the compiler inserts a no-arg constructor for you with a call to super(). class Example{ } becomes class Example{ Example(){ super(); // an accessible no-arg constructor must be present for the class to ...


5

Constexpr constructors are possibles, but the requirement are quite strict. The main problem for you is, as @dyp said, that std::unique_ptr as no trivial destructor and thus is not a LiteralType. If you try with an int under g++: class int_ptr : public std::unique_ptr<int> { public: constexpr int_ptr() : std::unique_ptr<int>(), ...


4

Here is your loop: for(int i = 42 ; i == 0; i = i - 1){ i is set to 42. Then the middle part states that the loop will only continue if i == 0 which is false because you just set it to 42. So the loop stops, and never even executes one iteration. You probably want for(int i = 42 ; i > 0; i = i - 1){ This will loop until i is less than or equal to ...


4

So how i can achieve this. You can't, basically - not the way you're trying. Each constructor chains to exactly one other constructor, either in the same class or the direct superclass. I suggest you create one "primary" constructor which does all the initialization you need, and then chain to it - potentially indirectly - from all the other ...


3

Manually instantiating classes inside another class creates implicit dependencies, which are quite hard to maintain - you will have a hard time detecting what needs to be changed if you ever need to change those Foo and Too classes. So, a better way of managing dependencies is: class Foo { private $_bar; function __construct(Bar $bar) { ...


3

public void class1() is not a constructor, it is a void method whose name happens to match the class name. It is never called. Instead java creates a default constructor (since you have not created one), which does nothing.


2

It's no problems. In C++ constructor and destructor are member-functions generated by default. You can override default behaviour with explicit constructor and destructor definitions. You can override both or only one of them. NOTE: for destructor do not forget to free all dynamic memory you've your class data-members are linking to, close all handles, ...


2

Why don't you use the constructor that you have already added your form? private Form_Main _mainForm; public Form_Log(Form_Main _f1) { InitializeComponent(); _mainForm = _f1; } private void Form1_FormClosing(Object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e) { var myList = _mainForm.folderList; }


2

If you don't declare a constructor explicitly, a default no-arg public constructor is added automatically. From the tutorials, You don't have to provide any constructors for your class, but you must be careful when doing this. The compiler automatically provides a no-argument, default constructor for any class without constructors. And this ...


2

"users" is an empty array which means its length is 0 when you hit the constructor. So assigning "this" to length-1 would mean assigning "this" to the "-1" index...thats why it is not working....get rid of the -1, or... Use the javascript array.push() function instead to add to your array perhaps Check out the example on W3Schools site... Array#push


2

It's not inherently bad. The downside is that it decreases the "testability" of your class, simply because Boo is now dependent on the existence Foo and Too.


1

This depends on the size of your project. On large projects, or long term projects, it should be changed slightly. Ideally, you would refactor it implement Dependency Injection pattern, and maybe use a Factory to instantiate it. Some sample code: interface FooInterface { function fooMethod(); } class Foo implements FooInterface { function ...


1

Ok, i have found the answer. public function __construct($db) { $this->_db_group=$db; parent::__construct(); } The value assignment has to be before calling parent constructor


1

I researched constructors, classes, and separate files. I learned how to make an object, and call the member functions from the other classes that were on different files. I should have done more research about this before I asked this question.


1

It depends of your requirement and the classes. Let's says that every call to the constructor of Foo/Too you will execute a huge query to the database to get data, in that scenario I would opt to use lazy instantiation. Of course, it's a good practice to initialize your properties on the constructor, but on real life performance could your enemy. Example: ...


1

I removed all information that cluttered your code. When using templates, constructors and copy constructors NEED the following: Example < eltType >(void); in the class definition. All objects that inherit from Countables are known as derived classes. They also may call a derived class a child, and the class in which it is derived from is called the ...


1

You are missing out on deleting some Example objects because of this line: d.e = NULL; in Child::Child(). You are allocating memory for e in the constructor of Deep. After executing the above line, that memory is leaked. You can resolve that problem by: Removing that line (or commenting it out), Deleting d.e before making it NULL, or Doing ...


1

Also, when you extend a class, the first thing you do in the constructor is call the constructor of the super class. In your case it's missing an super.SpinnerUtilityBase()


1

Just remove -1 from your code and it will look like bellow one var users = []; function user(username, password){ this.username = username; this.password = password; users[users.length] = this; }; var joe = new user('Joe', "joe100"); An HTML Demo code example for you <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <body> <p ...


1

There is not much difference in your particular case. But generally, if you wanted to initialize your object with some custom values, then you do it in a constructor. example : public Mainframe(String name, String number) { nameLbl = new JLabel( name ); nameTf = new JTextField( number ); }


1

This is arguably a design flaw in Java. class MyClass { // this is a constructor MyClass() {...} // this is an instance method void MyClass() {...} } Perfectly legal. Probably shouldn't be, but is. In your example, class1() is never getting called, because it's not a constructor. Instead, the default constructor is getting called. ...


1

I just came across this problem, and I solved it like this: function instantiate(ctor) { switch (arguments.length) { case 1: return new ctor(); case 2: return new ctor(arguments[1]); case 3: return new ctor(arguments[1], arguments[2]); case 4: return new ctor(arguments[1], arguments[2], arguments[3]); //... ...


1

Unless I'm missing something, you are calling the constructor like this: val msg = new SomeMessage(rawMessage) But the Message class doesn't not take a parameter, your class should be defined so: class Message(val message: String) { def this(m: Map[String, String]) = this("some value from mapping") } Also note that the constructor in scala must call ...


1

I don't know how advanced is your project but in this situation i would use delegates. Here is how i would do it: public delegate void ModifyCollectionHandler(string parameter); public delegate void ClearCollectionHandler(); public partial class Form1 : Form { public List<string> folderList; public Form1() { InitializeComponent(); ...


1

Try This, public class Form_Main : Form { public List<string> folderList; //<---- i want to access this..... private void button_showForm2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) { Form_Log ConfirmBoxForm = new Form_Log(this); ConfirmBoxForm.Show(); } } Form log : public partial class Form_Log : Form { private ...


1

yes that's true. The FileOutputStream(File file) invokes FileOutputStream(File file, boolean append) setting append=false. For your reference, the source code looks like public FileOutputStream(File file) throws FileNotFoundException { this(file, false); } public FileOutputStream(File file, boolean append) throws FileNotFoundException { ...



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