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8

This is not a constructor; because of void, it's a method. public void Person(String first, String middle, String last, String dateOfBirth){ There was no explicit constructor, so the Java compiler created a default, no-arg constructor. That explains the part of the error message that states: required: no arguments Remove the void to turn it into a ...


7

Constructors allows more complex initialization of fields, that could go far beyond simple assignment.


7

The compiler is eliding the move construction and directly constructing X(3) into c, essentially turning your initialization into X c(3); With gcc, you can disable this using the -fno-elide-constructors switch. Once you add that, the output from your original example is as expected: Constructor Copy Constructor Move Live demo


6

The first one is the best. It is referenced multiple times in the offical docs and in many books. It is a specific case of method-chaining or, as others noted in the comments, telescoping constructors. They allows you to write less code and to not repeat yourself (DRY). You can find that approach everywhere in solid libraries like Apache Commons and also ...


6

The intention is for those tuples to be tuples of references, as created by std::forward_as_tuple: Foo x; Bar y(1, 2, true); std::pair<A, B> p(std::piecewise_construct, std::forward_as_tuple(10, x, make()), std::forward_as_tuple(std::move(y), false, get(), 'a')); This constructs pair elements as if by A(10, x, ...


6

First look here: A o3 = A(4); The A(4) creates a temporary object. This expression is an rvalue. An rvalue cannot bind to a non-const lvalue reference like A&, so the copy constructor cannot be chosen. A better copy constructor declaration has a const A&, so that it can be constructed from rvalues too. That's why your (b) fix works. The same ...


5

To get collection initializer you'll need to implement 2 methods and inherit your class from IEnumerable: public class LayerGroup: IEnumerable { private readonly IList<string> _collection = new List<string>(); public void Add(string value) { _collection.Add(value); } public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() { ...


5

This is called copy elision. The rule in this situation is that a copy/move operation is specified, but the compiler is allowed to optionally elide it as an optimization, even if the copy/move constructor had side-effects. When copy elision happens, typically the object is created directly in the memory space of the destination; instead of creating a new ...


5

MY suggestion: Use a function: private: static int calculate_first(int input) {return input*5;} explicit Second(int input) : first(calculate_first(input)) {} Base classes will be initialized in the order they're declared in the class inheritance list, and then members will be initialized in the order that they're listed in the class, so the calculation ...


4

If you are just learning c++ then the best tip is stay away from memory management. Use the stl types if you can. Use a std::vector to replace that array: std::vector<std::vector<int>> data; create it like this: data(y_size, std::vector<int>(x_size, 0)); and access it like this: data[i][j]; As jaunchopanza said, you can also use a ...


4

super(), when used in the constructor will call the constructor of the class which is extended. In this case, it will call the WriteableComparator constructor. You can see more details on super in the java documentation here: Java super link In particular, see the section titled "Subclass Constructors".


4

A far more OO standards compliant way to do this is to use an abstract property. This means the base class has defined the property but the extending classes must implement it. This also means you cannot directly create an instance of vehicle, instead you must create one of the derived types. abstract class vehicle { vehicle() { } public ...


4

The C++ standard explicitly allows compilers to omit copies in certain situations. This is known as copy elision. One such situation is as you've shown: when a temporary class object that has not been bound to a reference (12.2) would be copied/moved to a class object with the same cv-unqualified type, the copy/move operation can be omitted by ...


3

The Java Tutorial states that [...] Constructors are not members. Therefore, there is no problem in calling them, since they are not bound to instances of your class. This would not make sense - hence, you cannot do the following: Thing thing = new Thing(); Thing anotherThing = thing.Thing(); A constructor is not a method, so you cannot apply ...


3

By making it a template too: template<typename T2, typename S2> filterable_data(const filterable_data<T2, S2>& other);


3

Make those variables properties instead: class a { public $a; public $b; public function __construct() { $this->a = 10; $this->b = 9; } } $z = new a(); echo $z->a; Better yet though, abstract your operation into a function: echo $z->addProperties(); // Inside a class public function addProperties() { ...


3

The array-style initializers are called Collection Initializers. In order for collection initializers to work, the object being initialized needs to implement IEnumerable, and provide the corresponding Add method, with the signature matching the parameters that you plan to supply. Hence the LayerGroup class needs to contain an Add method that looks like ...


3

As far as the quality of the constructor goes, there are other answers/comments which have explained why this is a bad idea. Regarding specifically placing all of your code into a constructor rather than directly in main, it has benefit when it comes to automated testing and portability. Moving all code into a constructor allows that code to be tested by ...


3

That book is quite notorious for being quite bad. But there is a heck of a lot fo code in that constructor, constructors are inteded to 'construct' an object, such as setting values of the object etc. Not perform so many tasks, create methods in the class that the constructor can call on instead.


3

you can put the repository into the base-class constructor if every class inherited from baseclass uses the same repository-type or if you use genric parameters like MyBaseClase<ELementtype> gets a IRepository<ElementType>. I usually have different repositorys for different model-class so my customer-model gets a customer-repository and ...


3

You must declare static member outside your class. In your header: class Phone{ ... static vector < class Phone* > instances; ... }; In your cpp you need to create the instance of it: //on global or namespace scope vector <Phone*> Phone::instances;


3

Your code is not valid and won't compile. x as defined in the constructor is local to the constructor only. It is not a field of the Mechanics class. To be able to use x somewhere else, you need to declare it as a field of the class: public class Mechanics { private int x; public Mechanics() { this.x = 1; //initialize x in the constructor ...


3

You are trying to call a string. def __str__(self): return '{0} - price: {1:.2f}, inventory: {2:d}'.format(self.__description(), self.__price(), self.__inventory()) you need to either leave the "()" out: def __str__(self): return '{0} - price: {1:.2f}, inventory: {2:d}'.format(self.__description, self.__price, self.__inventory) ...


3

I think you are asking why this A a[2] = { 0, 1 }; fails to compile, while you would expect it to compile because A may have a move constructor. But it doesn't. The reason is that A has a member that is not copyable, so its own copy constructor is deleted, and this counts as a user declared copy constructor has a user-declared destructor. This in turn ...


3

You can always make the default constructor private (or not have a default constructor at all). What you can't do is use a private default constructor from outside the class (or its friends). You haven't provided enough context to know for sure, but I suspect your problem is that something else in your code is trying to default construct a GridElem, so it ...


3

Initialize first in the member initializer list. It may help to perform your calculations in a helper function and use a forwarding constructor: class Second { public: Second() : Second(helper_function()) {} private: Second(int calc): first(calc) {} static int helper_function() { return ...; } First first; };


3

Exactly what you've done, only putting the variable name in where you had the asterisks: // Inherited classes class tesla : vehicle { private readonly string model = "Model S"; // This is unchanging tesla(string model) : base ( model ) { // Initialize } } You also need to ensure that the base class's constructor is ...


2

Do you want to pass the init-property name from Employee to Person? This is done like so: // Create a constructor-function for your Person-Object. function Person(name) { this.name = name; } // Create the constructor-function for an Employee-Object that extends Person function Employee(name) { // Call the constructor-function from Person ...


2

Rather than using a void SetList(List) called from constructors, you could have a List PrepareList(List). This method would prepare the list, and return it to the callers -ie: the constructors. So the code wouldn't be repeated -except an affectation _list = PrepareList(list) in each constructors.


2

Override your toString methode in your child class public String toString(){ return age + " " + name + " " + grade; } when your run this line in your agent class which is Data public static void main(String...args){ Child x = new Child(20, "James", 'A'); System.out.print(x.toString()); } output: Input age: 32 Input name: izak ...



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