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11

If you do not declare a constructor yourself, the compiler will always generate a public trivial one for you. They will also implicitly create a public copy constuctor and copy assignment operator. From c++ standard 12.1.5: If there is no user-declared constructor for class X, a constructor having no parameters is implicitly declared as defaulted. An ...


8

Constructors don't have return types, correct. But the expression new A() does have a result: A reference to the newly-created object. Here's what happens with new A(): An object is created It's given the type A The relevant A constructor is called with this referring to that new object Once initialization is done, the expression completes The result of ...


6

For calling methods the syntax is super.methodName(). Just super() will call the constructor. It's very similar to this keyword but for parent. this() calls this classes constructor from another constructor. super() calls the parents constructor from childs constructor. this.methodName() calls the method of the current class, super.methodName() calls the ...


6

The correct way to handle this is an initializer list. Write the constructor of Cylinder like this: Cylinder(double r, double h) : base(r), height(h) {} The part between the : and the opening brace is the initializer list that constructs all the data members of the class before the body of the constructor code is run. That way, C++ ensures that your ...


6

Since it's a constructor we are talking about here, it's reasonably efficient to just take the arguments by value and move them: X::X(std::vector<int> v1, std::vector<int> v2, std::vector<int> v3) : _v1(std::move(v1)), _v2(std::move(v2)), _v3(std::move(v3)) {} This costs up to one extra move per vector, depending on the actual ...


5

For the bounty: This is one of the biggest and most disgusting hacks I've ever created but its good enough for debug reasons in my opinion #include <iostream> #include <typeinfo> #define DEBUG_INSTANCE( classtype, name ) class _ ## classtype ## _INSTANCE_ ## name ## _ : public classtype \ { \ public: \ _ ## classtype ## ...


5

It is certainly possible for an instance to know its name from within the class method: #include <iostream> class Foo { public: void Print() { std::cout << "Instance name = " << this << std::endl; } }; int main() { Foo a, b; a.Print(); b.Print(); return 0; } will produce the output similar to this: Instance ...


4

The question is a really broad one, and it depends heavily on the rest of your API. So here are just some things you might need to consider when choosing one over another (in no particular order): Unnecessary pointers lead to more work for the GC. You might win some time by returning a pointer (one word) rather than a struct (zero to many words), but some ...


4

$A = new A(); $B = new B(); These two lines above create 2 different object, which don't have anything to do with each other. So since you also have a constructor in class B the parent constructor doesn't get called implicit, means you have to change your code and call the constructor from class A in class B, e.g. public function __construct() { ...


4

What is the default access of constructor in C++ and why? The implicitly generated default constructor, copy constructor, move constructor, copy assignment, move assignment and destructors are all implicitly declared public for obvious reasons (otherwise by default all types would not be instanciable, copyable, movable and destructible). If you are to ...


3

There is not default access to constructors. You decide what the access is when you declare it in the class. If you are talking about the default constructor that is created by the compiler then the C++ standard 12.1.4 has: [...]An implicitly-declared default constructor is an inline public member of its class.


3

If there is no explicit call to a super class constructor, the compiler will generate a call to super(). Because of this there is no difference between your examples.


3

Remembering my old days developing C#, don't you have to write ? : public PartitionSegment(Vector3 midpoint, float radius) : base(midpoint, radius) { }


3

It's really much simpler than that, and closer to your java code (only showing relevant parts): class StrategyManager { private: IState *_states[3]; public: StrategyManager(); }; StrategyManager::StrategyManager(){ _states[0] = new StateImpl(); _states[1] = new StateImpl(); _states[2] = new StateImpl(); ...


3

The problem is that when C++ begins the execution of the constructor code all the member variables must have been already constructed (what if you for example call a method of Circle before constructing it?). If immediate construction is a problem then a possible solution is to add to your member a default constructor and the using assignment in the body of ...


3

You can use dynamic_cast<void*> to retrieve the original pointer from a base class. The resulting pointer will always point to the most derived class, a.k.a. the whole object. As far as I am aware, it is illegal for pStorage and p to be different addresses.


3

Because it needs two user defined conversions, const char* -> std::string, and then std::string -> HasPtrValue, but only once user defined implicit conversion is permitted in an implicit conversion sequence. This must be handled by explicit conversions; (only one level of user defined implicit conversion is legal). So you can: vector<HasPtrValue> ...


2

Sounds like this is an academic question that would require a pedagogical answer. But if you're willing to entertain brute-force-and-ignorance it might serve your purposes to slice your pool blocks out of raw memory on even power-of-two boundaries, resulting in blocks that are guaranteed to be larger than any object to be placemented (and presumably ...


2

The simplest option is to create a setter like you have mentioned. There are many approaches, but this is the simplest. You have chosen to use Unity like a DI container, therefore your constructors function as dependency wiring code. The ID is not a dependency. Based on your comment... At the time that unity resolves the class, I don't know what ID the ...


2

The first item returned is a value, the second is a pointer. The pointer works much like a pointer in C or C++ only the value it points to is garbage collected like in C# or Java. Go offers something of a compromise between those two paradigms. The pointer is explicit and exposed, however it's still garbage collected. Here are a few somewhat obvious ...


2

No Difference, Its just a matter of explicit and implicit. In the second case, it implicitly calls the super constructor of this Students class if it is inherited from a parent class. Read more on this. You can find more info if you google it. public class A { //there is a hidden constructor. Even if you explicitly write it //public A(){ //} ...


2

Simply override getMinFuelTime and getMaxFuelTime in your child classes, as such: public class Type1Plane extends Plane{ private Time minFuelTime = new Time(0, 20, 0) // 20 minute private Time maxFuelTime = new Time(0, 40, 0) // 40 minute public Type2Plane (int id, Time currentTime) { super(id, currentTime); } protected Time ...


2

You can use the base constructor. public PartitionSegment(Vector3 midpoint, float radius) : base(midpoint, radius) { //additional relevant code }


2

You don't need to access the json object using indices. The key is all you need. Also, you want to access res, which is your object you loaded, not json, the name of the module self.EURToUSD = res['EUR_USD'] insead of this: self.EURToUSD = json[6]['EUR_USD']


2

The compiler doesnt automatically know the type of the array so it has to be expressly defined when declaring it as an expression private Item item = new Item("Something", new String[] {"A", "B"}, null);


2

The readResolve implementation is there to prevent the creation of invalid instances of the case class by editing serialised copies of the class. Depending on how much you trust the environment in which the code will be used, you may feel you can safely ignore this risk. It comes about because case classes extend Serializable, and so may end up getting ...


2

See Java Language Specification: A protected member or constructor of an object may be accessed from outside the package in which it is declared only by code that is responsible for the implementation of that object. Your class A2 is not responsible for the implementation of A in the new A() call. Meaning, it is not responsible for the implementation ...


1

Move the line that constructs the object after the switch statement. int intake, choice; cin >> choice; switch(choice){ case 1: cin >> intake; // Don't do this. // q(intake); break; case 2: ... default: } // Now that you have intake, construct q. Quota q(intake);


1

There's no default access for a constructor or any other member. In a class defined with the keyword class all members are private by default; in a class defined with the keyword struct they are public by default. That includes the constructor.


1

giving your partition base class a parameter less default constructor would also get rid of your error message.



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