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12

It depends on the order of the members m_BoundingBox and m_Area in the class definition. The standard states: 12.6.2/10 In a non-delegating constructor, initialization proceeds in the following order: — First, and only for the constructor of the most derived class (1.8), virtual base classes are initialized in the order they appear on a ...


8

It is possible since C++11. it is the delegating constructor, and you use the correct syntax.


7

The program tries to initiate ledLight using the default constructor and then assigns l to ledLight. The compiler gives you an error because there is no default constructor for Light. Try this instead: Button(Light l): ledLight(l) { }


6

First of all there is no difference between new Pepper() and new Pepper apart from the fact that the last one will hurt your feelings. Thanks to Douglas Crockford if you know what I mean. How to make a === b? Singleton is the answer. Check this out: function Pepper () { if (Pepper.instance) { return Pepper.instance } Pepper.instance = this; } a = new ...


6

public class iProperty : PropertyDescriptor { private string propName; private object propValue; // Need Parameterless Construtor ? public iProperty() : base("placeholder", new Attribute[] { }) { } public iProperty(string pName, object pValue) : base(pName, new Attribute[] { }) { propName = pName; ...


6

Because The constructor of ClassB does not override the constructor of ClassA. It is a completely different method, that only calls (explicitly or implicitly) the constructor of ClassA. So the visibility can be lowered, too. Another intesting point is, that the default constructor of ClassA would be called if you didn't call many constructor of ClassA ...


6

If you're using C++11, you can construct as: Point newPoint {someXValue, someYValue}; and if you're not, assuming this is a POD structure, you could: Point newPoint = {someXValue, someYValue};


5

COM does not support passing arguments to a constructor. The underlying object factory method (IClassFactory::CreateInstance) does not accept arguments. The workaround is pretty simple, all problems in software engineering can be solved by another level of indirection :) Just create your own factory method. You can write one that takes the arguments that ...


5

In your code snippet, this(port, 50, null) denotes an explicit call to a constructor in the same class, which has three parameters, for two of which you pass hardcoded arguments (50 and null)


5

The simplest way would be to create two constructors. One for each type. public class MyClass { public MyClass (Double d) { //stuff } public MyClass(String[] s) { //other stuff } } Also, i recommend you read this article


5

You can give your class a private constructor to which all the public constructors delegate. Here, the first argument determines whether to initialise: private: A(bool do_initialize, int n, char c, bool b) /* initialisers */ { if (do_initialize) initialize(); } public: A(int n, char c, bool b) : A(true, n, c, b) {} A(int n) : ...


4

You can build an enum with any type, here we use a tuple (much like python) with a little alias for it to be easier to type. import std.stdio; import std.typecons; alias FooT = Tuple!(string, "s", int, "i"); enum Foo : FooT { A = FooT("A string", 0), B = FooT("B string", 1), C = FooT("C string", 2), } void main(string[] args) { ...


4

Your identification type specifies either a name or a social security number. It looks to me like you want to have both of them. For that you should probably use a record type: type ident = { name: string; ss: int * int } Since your person type has just one variant, it is redundant (not to say that it couldn't be useful in some cases). Here is a value of ...


4

Use a factory method. But you will get another function. Point CreatePoint(int x, int y) { Point temp; temp.x=x;temp.y=y; return temp; }


3

You will need to use reflection to access the private field. You can access all fields of a type using the GetField(s) method. You can access their values using the GetValue function public string GetLongText(StringReader reader) { // Get a reference to the private field var field = reader.GetType().GetField("LongText", BindingFlags.NonPublic | ...


3

Inside those operators : operator<< operator+ operator- operator* operator/ You should take const bin& instead of bin&. Otherwise your functions won't be able to take a temporary as parameter. And, when you chain operators, the values returned by each independent operator is a temporary.


3

You need to call one, and exactly one, constructor of the base class. In your example, as you correctly say, the no-argument constructor of the Building class will get called. The single-argument constructor will not get called. There is no requirement for matching the parameter names or types between the base class constructor and the derived class ...


3

Just some feedback, in an answer due to code snippets: Adapting the code at the 3rd link to: #include <iostream> using namespace std; struct SM { int val; SM(int a) : val(a) { cout <<"Constructor val="<<a<<endl;} ~SM() { cout << "Destructor val="<<val<<endl; } SM(const SM& ) = delete; ...


3

Nope, they are initialized in the order in which they are declared in the class block. The order in the initialization list has no effect (and that's why many compilers emit a warning when they do not match).


2

The idiomatic thing is to take those parameters of a function or constructor that you commonly want to partially apply, and move them toward the beginning: data FooBar a = Foo [a] String Char | Bar [a] String Int foo :: String -> Char -> FooBar a foo = Foo [] bar :: String -> Int -> FooBar a bar = Bar [] Similarly, reordering ...


2

I'll address your questions one by one. Default arguments do not exist in Haskell. They are simply not worth the added complexity and loss of compositionally. Being a functional language, you do a lot more function manipulation in Haskell, so funkiness like default arguments would be tough to handle. One thing I didn't realize when I started Haskell is ...


2

You can simply have a single variable that stores an object: var item = function(name, props) { this.name = name; this.props = props; this.sharedMethod = function() { // do stuff } } Then simply pass an object with several properties: new item("one", {"house": "blue", "car": "new"}); You can also set them as properties ...


2

Fields declared as private are inaccessible outside the class that defined them. You cannot read their value without either Changing their visibility Adding an accessor method/property with public visibility Using reflection (this is not recommended, there is almost always a better way) What is the use-case here? What are you trying to achieve? If you ...


2

You can set instance properties in both constructor and activate methods, they are both going to be invoked by Aurelia. However, there is sort of conceptual difference here. Activate is one of the screen activation lifecycle methods and should ideally be used to control screen/view-model behavior only. For example, canDeactivate method controls whether ...


2

You can create a parameterless contructor, but you have to call one of base class contructors anyway public class iProperty : PropertyDescriptor { public iProperty() : base(someDefaults) { } } You can also implement a parameterless constructor in the base class and make it protected. That way no-one except the derived class can call ...


2

this(port, 50, null); means call the constructor of current class which takes int, int, Object (I guess) as an arguments.this refers to the current Object. Here it is used to call constructor from other constructor i.e called ServerSocket(int port, int num, Object x) from ServerSocket(int port)


2

First off, NavigationPage doesn't have a "View" property. It's common practice to include a Page in its constructor, which I'm guessing may contribute to your error about the parameterless constructor not existing. I also have to mention that in most cases instantiating NavigationPages in XAML is unnecessary. Now that I got that out of the way, here's how ...


2

You're missing a default constructor. Try modifying your class like this: class Light { int pin; public: Light()=default; //<-- put this in Light(int p) { pin = p; } }; As to why you're not automatically generating a default constructor, it's because you're already declaring a constructor of some type, so ...


2

Well, actually new Class_name(arguments) will create a new instance of the class. A construction might be useful - it is more concise than Class_name instance = new Class_name(arguments); method_name(instance); but you would not be able to access instance later on.


2

It's not really a recognized good practice. Maybe the default constructor did something in previous versions. Maybe the developer thought it would be a good idea, so that if something additional is done in the default constructor, it will also be done in the other one. If you look at ArrayList, you'll see that a different choice was made. What happens if ...



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