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17

§13.3.1.7 [over.match.list]/p1: When objects of non-aggregate class type T are list-initialized (8.5.4), overload resolution selects the constructor in two phases: Initially, the candidate functions are the initializer-list constructors (8.5.4) of the class T and the argument list consists of the initializer list as a single argument. If no ...


9

The n2100 proposal for initializer lists goes into great detail about the decision to make sequence constructors (what they call constructors that take std::initializer_lists) to have priority over regular constructors. See Appendix B for a detailed discussion. It's succinctly summarized in the conclusion: 11.4 Conclusion So, how do we decide ...


7

: this(…) after the constructor calls another constructor with the specified arguments. For example: public class A { public A (string foo) { Console.WriteLine(foo); } public A () : this("foo bar") {} } This will allow you to create an object of A and pass a string to customize its output; or you can call it without arguments ...


7

GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes) will return the parameterless constructor, or null if one does not exist, so you can have: return typeof(TT).GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes) != null; EDIT I'm guessing your problem is that TT and source.GetType() are actually two different types. source.GetType() probably derives from TT but has no parameterless ...


6

Use reflection to check if the type has a parameterless constructor. Use Type.GetConstructor: bool HasDefaultConstructor<TT>() { ConstructorInfo c = typeof(TT).GetConstructor(new Type[] { }); // A constructor without any types defined: no parameters return c != null; } If you just want to create an instance of TT, use the new ...


6

It's typically for performance. In your example it's probably the case that MyObject is allocates with 1, 2 or 3 parameters, and therefore the developer has optimized for this. Firstly the underlying implementation may be optimized, and also at the call site the parameters can be passed without any additional memory allocation. By using a params the ...


5

Do not assign Parent of control in your constructor (or in any part inside your control code). Setting parent inside control itself interferes with the way VCL framework works in both design and run-time. Instead you can override SetParent method, and do your initialization there. procedure SetParent(AParent: TWinControl); override; procedure ...


5

When you call: Rational r1 = new Rational(num1, den1); Rational r2 = new Rational(num2, den2); in the main method of your program you are creating two instances of the Rational class, one named r1 and one named r2. Because you are passing int values to the Rational constructors, the constructor that will be called is the constructor which requires two ...


5

An array has a fixed size (at least in standard C++), so you cannot assign a size to it at runtime, but have to specify its size at compile time. If you want a variable size, use a std::vector, in your case std::vector<char> m_components; If the vector is const, then you won't be able to change/append to it, so I don't really see the point of ...


4

If you don't explicitly declare a constructor it's the same as doing public class SomeExample { public SomeExample() {} } As for your two fields allJewelCards and allDiamonds, they're initialized so you don't have an inherent need to declare them in a constructor.


4

_tv(*v); Declares a variable of type "pointer to _tv". The name of that variable is v. Consider [dcl.meaning]/6: In a declaration T D where D has the form       ( D1 ) the type of the contained declarator-id is the same as that of the contained declarator-id in the declaration T D1 Parentheses do not ...


4

Simple like this if(x[1] instanceof Road) { //Hey, you have a road! }


4

Yes. It's saying that you will always get a call to the super() constructor as the first statement in your constructor (unless you use a this(), but then that will have a super() call as it's first statement - or an alternate call, eventually super() will be called). Consider what happens in the empty constructor of a hypothetical class like Main with a ...


3

You missed this bit: by declaring at least one constructor That's what's preventing the default constructor from being created. The example given has a default access (package access) constructor: PackageOnly() { } ... so it satisfies both conditions: a) it declares at least one constructor; b) it declares no public constructors.


3

Circle takes a Point instance as its first constructor argument Circle c = new Circle(new Point(3.0,3.0), 3.0);


3

If the parameter-less constructor is called it will call the constructor accepting a single string, passing "..". In your case there is no such constructor though, so the code wont compile.


3

You did not declare a move constructor, but a regular constructor : no implicit constructor will be deleted. A move constructor would be of the form Foo(Foo&& arg) (with any cv-qualifier on the argument) Also note that this statement is not valid C++ : Foo::Foo(f); Maybe you meant : Foo g = Foo(f);


3

That's not a move constructor, so it doesn't suppress any implicit ones. Just like Foo(const int&) isn't a copy constructor, Foo(int&&) isn't a move constructor, it's just a constructor taking an rvalue reference. A move constructor looks like one of: Foo(Foo&&) Foo(const Foo&&) Foo(volatile Foo&&) Foo(const volatile ...


3

The whole initializer list thing was meant to enable list initialisation like so: std::vector<int> v { 0, 1, 2 }; Consider the case std::vector<int> v { 123 }; That this initializes the vector with one element of value 123 rather than 123 elements of value zero is intended. To access the other constructor, use the old syntax Foo foo(10); ...


3

First of all, template types cannot be deduced from default arguments. So we can only look for other ways to achieve the idea of being able to optionally specify an argument to match a forwarding reference. This workaround suggests itself: template <typename Range, typename Encoding = encoder_t, typename Validation = validator_t> test ( ...


3

C(AN_E_VALUE); This declares an object of type C with name AN_E_VALUE. The error complains about the fact that you need a default constructor to initialize AN_E_VALUE, but no default constructor exists (and none is implicitly declared).Have you ever tried this?: int(a); That's essentially accomplishes the same thing. Perhaps check out this question.


3

Try this in the .h file class mtp_wrapper { private: LIBMTP_raw_device_t * usbrawdevice; int numusbrawdevice; LIBMTP_error_number_t err; LIBMTP_mtpdevice_t *dev; public: mtp_wrapper(); void setDevice(LIBMTP_mtpdevice_t *dev); LIBMTP_mtpdevice_t *getDevice(); }; and this in the cpp mtp_wrapper::mtp_wrapper() : dev(NULL) { ...


2

You would have to bind the object to the function var app = new APP("ieps"); var testing = app.test.bind(app); console.log(testing()); http://jsbin.com/kiyiyutili/2/edit EDIT: From the MDN docs for .bind: "The bind() method creates a new function that, when called, has its this keyword set to the provided value, with a given sequence of arguments ...


2

Your two constructors with default arguments "overlap": Node(const int&, Node* = nullptr, Node* = nullptr, Node* = nullptr); And: Node(const int&, Node* = nullptr); Both of these could match a call with just an int or just an int and a Node *. Looks like there are other overlapping constructors as well.


2

__new__ is the type’s constructor, and you usually don’t want to use it like that ever. The normal way to create an object, that also includes calling its initializator is this: order_order(order_completed_date=order_completed_date, ...) So, just call the type; and the parameters of that call will be passed to the initializator.


2

The reason it works is that when you call city(cityobj) it uses the compiler's implicitly defined copy constructor, and when you call city(&cityobj) it uses the converting constructor you defined yourself: city(city* cityobj). You didn't mean to say neighbor(&cityobj) did you?


2

The problem is simpler than you think. You're on the right track but you forgot to assign courseTaught in your Teacher constructor. The initial value of courseTaught is null and it stays that way because you never assign it to anything. You'd want something like this: public Teacher(String tName, String tCourseTaught){ super(tName); // <- takes ...


2

Base s = new Base(); will invoke automatically Super() constructor But alternate constructor like argument constructor will actually will not call super(); you have explicitly call super() or super(argument) whatever available in the super class Alternate constructor also includes this() which will call Base() constructor which will not allow super() ...


2

Here are your two constructors: public ProductoExtranjero(int PaisOrigen, String UnNombre, String UnRubro) { super(UnNombre, UnRubro); this.PaisOrigen = PaisOrigen; } public ProductoExtranjero(int PaísOrigen) { this.PaisOrigen = PaisOrigen; } Both of them have parameters. But this line: ProductoExtranjeroPe = new ProductoExtranjero(); ... ...


2

A a = b; This would call the conversion constructor of class A. A(const B&){ } << This is conversion constructor for class A which defines conversion from B to A Its same like we declare A(int i) {} << Convert int to class A object. Even if you remove the relationship between class A and B then also it lead to that constructor ...



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