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11

In C++17 and later I expect the preferred idiom will be std::optional<T>. In C++11 and C++14 it seems that std::unique_ptr<T> is common though it has the obvious drawback of requiring a heap allocation. Usage: std::optional<T> t; // initially empty // do some stuff // now we're ready to create the T value t.emplace(foo, bar); // ...


8

From C++11, [class.base.init]¶6: If a constructor delegates to itself directly or indirectly, the program is ill-formed; no diagnostic is required. All compilers are right – the code is broken, and the compiler isn't required to tell you so. At this point you have UB; from [intro.compliance]¶2: If a program contains a violation of a rule for which ...


7

The class constructor is not the one doing the initialization, the JVM does this. After memory for the object is created, the members of the object are default initialized to some predictable value. According to the specification Each class variable, instance variable, or array component is initialized with a default value when it is created (§15.9, §...


5

Use a single primary constructor that will do final fields assignment. All other constructors will call that one using this(), e.g.: public Foo(File file, Dog dog, ...) this(file, dog, getImportantString()); } getImportantString() is needed because you can't do anything in constructor before this() call and also it needs to be static for it to work ...


4

Since Java is an object oriented language, you have to have a mindset of dealing with instances that are realizations of the classes you defined. These are the objects. So if you want to call a method from packageClassTwo class, you first create an object of packageClassTwo. You seem to be trying to do just this. Once you have the object, you can call its ...


3

First, an int variable is a C++ object. Presumably when you talk about about C++ objects as opposed to int, you mean class type objects. But not just class type objects, because you can do this: struct Blah{ int x; int y; }; auto main() -> int { Blah o; // Uninitialized, indeterminate value. // Whatever o = {6, 7}; }; So probably you ...


3

In Java fields are initialized before the constructor. This can be easily proved by the following code: public class MyClass { int MyField = InitMyField(); MyClass(){ System.out.println("ctor"); } static int InitMyField() { System.out.println("init field"); return 1; } } output init field ctor You can also ...


3

Isn't the default constructor initializing the instance member name = null? No, constructors get called after all instance variables are initialized by the default values: 0 or the equivalent value for primitive numerical types, false for the boolean type, null for reference types.


3

This is simple polymorphism. You are creating a B object, so when the A constructor is invoking setI(), it is calling the "B version" (which leads to 3*20 = 60). In other words: when you call a method on a object in Java, the JVM will check at runtime of which concrete class that object is; and invoke the method it finds on that class. Thus: setI() is ...


3

For what it's worth, the code looks OK to me. I don't see anything controversial in this use of static_cast - it's run-of-the-mill derived-to-base pointer conversion. Looks like a compiler bug to me. If you insist on chapter and verse: [expr.static.cast]/4 An expression e can be explicitly converted to a type T using a static_cast of the form ...


2

The problem here is order of destructors calls. Here is a simple example: #include <functional> #include <iostream> #include <memory> #include <string> using namespace std; class Object { public: Object(){ cout<<"O\n"; } ~Object() { cout<<"~O\n"; } }; class AbstractBase { public: AbstractBase(){ cout<<"A\n"...


2

undefined reference to 'Tool::Tool()' is a linker error message. It means your cpp files individually are successfully compiled, but the linker can't find Tool::Tool() when creating the binary. It's most likely a project setup issue in your build system.


1

Java is a strong typed language - this means you need to have declaration of each referenced type. However, you can use Map<String,Object> to pass structure less data and workaround it. Online Demo - https://repl.it/CgWw/1 import java.util.*; class Main { public static Map<String, Object> aMethod() { Map<String,Object> results = ...


1

First, ask yourself, what is this Object that you want to return? What does it represent? Next, write a class named after whatever this thing represents, with a constructor that takes the parameters you require. Finally, change the return type of aMethod() from Object to the class that you just wrote.


1

You could do this. It's depending on the fact that every non primitive type (i.e. arrays) inherits from Object. But if you do it, demons will come to take your first born. static public Object aMethod() { Object[] objectArray = new Object[] {}; Integer integer = new Integer(1); return new Object[] {objectArray, integer}; }


1

Are you looking for something like this? this is do-able public class Main { public static void main(String[] args) { Object o = method(); } public static Object method() { return new Object() { int x = 1; String str = "test"; }; } }


1

I don't think there's a way to achieve what you want because Java isn't a dynamic language. You might be able to use an anonymous inner class to do what you want.


1

It does. Although the question is based more on usage. public class Main { String x; Main() { x = "Init"; } @Override public String toString() { return x; } public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println(new Main()); } } Ouput: Init


1

No, it is not the default constructor which initialize the instance variables for you. Each type has a default value. The moment you created the object, the default value is used. So if you do not explicitly initialize the instance variables, they will be still using the default values defined for them implicitly. i.e. 0 for int, null for reference type.. ...


1

Immutable objects are often constructed by creating a builder and then set all properties to it that are relevant and finally calling Commit() to retrieve the immutable version of it. I am personally pretty fond of a "fake" immutable class that looks like this: public interface IPlanet { string Name { get; } } internal class PlanetBuilder : IPlanet { ...


1

If you mean that each customer can have an unlimited number of drinks they can order, and you want a random order of one drink for that customer each time you call the order() method then you just just need to pick a random drink for the customers drinks property? var Customer = function(name, drinks) { this.drinks = drinks; this.name = name; ...


1

This code is async this._reparacionsService.getReparacions().subscribe(rep => this.reparacions = rep.json()); this means that this.getLastWeek(); in ngOnInit() { this.getReparacions(); this.getLastWeek(); is executed before this.reparacions = rep.json() is executed You probably want to do something like getReparacions() { return this....


1

You need to use the Singleton pattern. public class SomeClass{ private static String returnString = null; protected SomeClass() {} //So that you can block calling default constructor public static String getStaticInstance(String a, String b) { if (returnString == null) { returnString = a + b; } return returnString; } } ...


1

If you want to call all methods of packageClassTwo you have to do it explicitly packageClassTwo pct = new packageClassTwo(""); pct.CreateWord(); pct.CreateSentence(); If you allways want the 2 methods to be called when you create a new packageClassTwo object, than you can just add the calls to the constructor public packageClassTwo(String name) { ...


1

If you don't know the value to assign to a field, that can mean two things: Mostly, it means you don't have the class at all. Note that in C++, class is not a 'collecting storage' for some data until you have it (we have a separate pattern/anti-pattern called Builder for that), in which case you shouldn't create the class. You might consider having several ...


1

If myoldClass is an existing class and you want to inject the IMemcache argument while keeping backwards compatibility with classes that aren't DI-constructed, you can do this: public myoldClass(string a, string b, IMemcache memcache = null) { _a = a; _b = b; _memcache = memCache ?? new Memcache(); } A DI container will ...


1

It may be a compiler bug. I reduced and simplified the code example: struct ctor_takes_int { // dummy parameter needed to put expression in a ctor-init-list of derived class ctor_takes_int (int=0){ } } ; struct stupid_base { //int nevermind; } ; struct upcast_in_init_list; /* * volatile = anti optimisation : * no value propagation ...


1

Java creates a default constructor if and only if no other explicit constructor is provided. From the docs: You don't have to provide any constructors for your class, but you must be careful when doing this. The compiler automatically provides a no-argument, default constructor for any class without constructors. See: https://docs.oracle.com/javase/...


1

In ES6, Reflect.construct() is quite convenient: Reflect.construct(F, args)



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