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30

Now, on creating a new instance of class B, which constructor of class A is automatically called before invoking the class B constructor? The code will fail to compile, basically. Each constructor has to chain to another constructor, either implicitly or explicitly. The constructor it chains to can be in the same class (with this) or the base class ...


11

You will never benefit from duplicating code. This is premature optimization. A method call costs nothing, unless you perform it very often in a short while. In this case, it is acceptable to inline the code if it is not used in too many places of the system, but that is not your case. Imagine that one day you add another feature to your class. If you ...


8

You can't use that initialisation syntax in a class member declaration; you can only initialise members with {} or =. The following should work (assuming support for C++11 or later): Foo foo{true}; Foo foo = Foo(true);


7

A move constructor is executed only when you construct an object. A move assignment operator is executed on a previously constructed object. It is exactly the same scenario as in the copy case. Foo foo = std::move(bar); // construction, invokes move constructor foo = std::move(other); // assignment, invokes move assignment operator If you don't declare ...


7

You can't combine both constructors into one. But you can declare main constructor that construct your fields, and the other constructors just call it, for example. // new constructor public DataResponse(DataErrorEnum error, DataStatusEnum status) { this(null, error, status); } public DataResponse(String response, DataErrorEnum error, ...


7

This is indeed a quite a strange request, maybe you should reconsider the general approach. What is the meaning of this particular 42 value? What is the question for which 42 is the answer? Maybe you should have two sibling Deriveds, or subclass Derived for x==42 case or for x!=42 case, etc. Or maybe 42 comes from a different-type object and you can use a ...


6

You have to tell Java what type of array it is, e.g. Cat cat = new Cat("Maurycy", new String[][]{{"Adam", "Greta"}, {"Jurek", "Tyrmand"}});


6

Main.java package pokus1; public class Main { public int m_a; public int m_b; public Main(int a, int b) { m_a = a; m_b = b; } public Main() { this(0,0); } public static void main(String[] args) { Main main = new Main(); } } Javap output (javap -v Main.class) for pokus1.Main(): Do ...


5

There might be difference in contexts involving std::initializer_list<>, e.g.: Case 1 - () and {} #include <initializer_list> #include <iostream> using namespace std; struct Test2 { Test2(initializer_list<int> l) {} }; int main() { Test2* test3 = new Test2(); // compile error: no default ctor Test2* test4 = new ...


5

According to the C++ Standard (8.3.6 Default arguments): 9 Default arguments are evaluated each time the function is called. The order of evaluation of function arguments is unspecified. Consequently, parameters of a function shall not be used in a default argument, even if they are not evaluated. Parameters of a function declared before a ...


4

Does this part of code returns an object of type x by value? Yes, it creates and value-initialises a temporary object of type X (by calling the constructor with the default value of zero) and returns that. can a constructor can return an object? No, that doesn't make any sense. But an conversion expression like X() does.


4

Once you provide your own constructor to class A, no automatic invocations happens during the class B object creation. The first line in your class B constructor should be super(paramsToClassAConstructor) or it can be call to another constructor with in the class B using this(). It is the responsibility of the second constructor in class B to call the class ...


4

"98" is a String, not a double. You need to remove the quotes: EMR p2 = new EMR("Anquan","9-30-77", "stomach ache", 98, 120, "stress", "Tylenol");


4

Use a helper function: class b { a x; b() : x(complicated_computation()) { } private: static int complicated_computation() { return result_of_complicated_computations; } }; And the default-constructor isn't deleted, but undeclared.


4

Generally, there is no difference at all, because the just in time compiler inlines short methods. Moreover, even if the code was not inlined, the overhead caused by the two branch instructions in machine code is unlikely to materially affect the runtime of the entire program, unless the program spends most of its time working with these vectors.


4

From Oracle docs With super(), the superclass no-argument constructor is called. With super(parameter list), the superclass constructor with a matching parameter list is called. Note: If a constructor does not explicitly invoke a superclass constructor, the Java compiler automatically inserts a call to the no-argument constructor of the ...


3

But I want to do with constructor, using new. Any ideas? No, that's not possible. You won't be able to subclass Imageafter all. If you needed "instances" with your own methods, better create a wrapper object (like doing this.img = new Image(…) in your constructor). Using a factory function is totally fine, it just seems to be appropriate here. If you ...


3

Since your BackgroundOptionSlider extends an Activity, you can't avoid having a default public constructor. making sure there is only one instance ever The way to accomplish this is already given to you by the system, declare <activity android:name=".BackgroundOptionSlider" android:label="@string/update_background" ...


3

In Javascript terminology, an object a's "prototype" refers to the object from which a inherits properties. The standards-based way to access this is with Object.getPrototypeOf: var protoOfA = Object.getPrototypeOf(a); There's also the old way, non-standard but supported by some browsers: var protoOfA = a.__proto__; But if you have a function F, ...


3

super() invokes the parameterless constructor of the super class. In your code it makes no difference, since the compiler will add super() implicitly if you don't. In general, you add an explicit call to the super class's constructor if you wish to call a specific constructor of the super class.


3

When does a move assignment operator get called When you assign an rvalue to an object, as you do in your first example. and when does a move constructor operator get called? When you initialise an object using an rvalue, as you do in your second example. Although it isn't an operator. So has it do to with which is implemented? No, that ...


3

You didn't actually declare a constructor for class C. What you meant to do was this: class C { public: C() : b(&a) // you have to provide the arguments to B's constructor here { } private: A a; B b; // ... not here };


3

Create a parameterless constructor like public Form1() { InitializeComponent(); }


3

Value-initialization for an array will value-initialize each element in the array. You have an array of arrays, so each element (an array) will be value-initialized. From there, return to the first sentence of this answer for what happens to each array. The answer your second question (actually posted as a comment to a different answer), regular ...


3

When you are passing doubles to a method (ie a constructor), you cannot surround the double with quotes, otherwise they are strings.


3

SuchString(SuchString& a); takes a non-const reference as a parameter, so passing it temporaries is not doable. What you probably want is SuchString(const SuchString& a); because when you return by value, a copy is made - i.e.: return SuchString(lel); will create a temporary SuchString which is then copied and returned. In theory, that is, ...


3

The range constructor for std::priority_queue allows you to pass a comparator function in as an optional argument: template <class InputIterator> priority_queue (InputIterator first, InputIterator last, const Compare& comp = Compare(), const Container& ctnr = Container()); So just call it like this: ...


2

The answer is a bit buried in the standard. A using declaration is defined as (7.3.3): using [typename] nested-name-specifier unqualified-id; The nested-name-specifier resolves after some steps into simple-template-id which is defined as template-name < [template-argument-list] > In short, the standard conforming syntax is template <typename ...


2

template <typename T> class variant { struct moo {}; public: variant(const variant& ) = default; variant(std::conditional_t<!std::is_copy_constructible<T>::value, const variant&, moo>, moo=moo()); variant() {}; }; This makes a non-eligible template instance have two copy ...


2

Try to avoid the use of static constructors as much as possible. Unlike instance constructors, you cannot actively invoke a static constructor - it is ran when the type is first being used (which may change due to optimalisation or even obfuscation). Also try to avoid doing "work" in a constructor. The constructor is meant to construct the instance, and ...



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