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9

Assuming you mean why there is no access modifier for the constructor, that's because In an enum declaration, a constructor declaration with no access modifiers is private. and It is a compile-time error if a constructor declaration in an enum declaration is public or protected (§6.6). It's redundant to specify private, so some people don't.


9

Yes. Get rid of your constructors and use instead some other approach, such as 1) A Factory Method, so you'd have methods like this: class MorseString { private MorseString(){}; public static MorseString getFromCode(String s) { // ... } public static MorseString getFromString(String s) { // ... } } // Usage: ...


7

Basically, Java has slightly different set of syntax rules, by the sounds of it. When the grammar says you've got a variable declaration with an initializer, such as this: Box box = new Box(); ... it knows that Box has to be the name of a type, not the name of a variable. So it doesn't matter whether or not there's a variable called Box in scope. (That ...


7

Better to move your initialization code to some method (init()) which you will call from constructor, as well from every other place where you need it. Constructors shouldn't be considered as being like any other method. Their purpose is to create new instances of the class, so calling one from that object's method can't result in changing the caller's ...


7

The default constructor is a no-args constructor that the JVM inserts on your behalf; it contains a default call to super(); (not supper()) which is the default behavior. If you implement any constructor then you no longer receive a default constructor. JLS-8.8.9. Default Constructor says (in part), If a class contains no constructor declarations, then ...


5

Inside display you do not initialize i so you print random garbage, which happens to be a 0 in your test. Printing out lengthhappens to put a 0 on the stack which then happens to initialize i. Your compiler should warn you about reading an uninitialized variable.


5

Java is using different namespaces for different types of identifiers. The restricted syntax of Java makes it unambiguous whether you are referring to a type, a function, a variable or a label.


5

new Employee(); is invoking public Employee(){ this("JJ", 0); System.out.println(name +" "+ idNumber); } In this constructor this("JJ", 0); is invoking public Employee(String name, int num) constructor, which ends with call System.out.println(name +" 2nd "+ idNumber);. which is responsible for printing JJ 2nd 0 When ...


5

If your constructor is explicit and class have no non-explicit constructor, that receives initializer_list<T>, than you cannot copy-list-initialize object of this class. W w = {1,2}; // compiles without explicit, but not with Simple live example Quotes from standard: 8.5/16 — If the initializer is a (non-parenthesized) braced-init-list, the ...


4

During value-initialization, if T is a class type without a user-provided or deleted default-constructor, then the object is zero-initialized (§8.5/8.2). This is indeed the case with wrapper. Your first example matches the third case for zero-initialization (§8.5/6.1, emphasis mine) — if T is a scalar type (3.9), the object is initialized to the ...


4

This does appear to be a bug in MSVC. In all three cases wrapper has no user-provided default constructor, so initialization with wrapper() invokes: (All citations from n3690) (8.5/11) An object whose initializer is an empty set of parentheses, i.e., (), shall be value-initialized. (thanks to dyp), this will result in zero-intialization of int v ...


4

When you wrote: ... new Employee(); You end up calling the default (no-argument) constructor. The first line of code in that constructor is: this("JJ", 0); Which calls the 2-parameter constructor, in which you write System.out.println(name +" 2nd "+ idNumber); This is the first of the two output statements your program encounters, and thus is the ...


4

A move constructor is just another constructor. If you have overloaded constructors, just like having any other functions overloaded, the choice of which constructor is called comes down to the rules of overload resolution. That is, when you construct an object with Foo a(<some-expression>);, there might be multiple possible constructors and one needs ...


3

In general we have to tell it by giving an rvalue reference argument. For example: template<class T> void swap(T& a, T& b) { T tmp = std::move(a); a = std::move(b); b = std::move(tmp); } The move() is a standard-library function returning an rvalue reference to its argument move(x) means "give me an rvalue reference to x". That is, ...


3

Would it make a difference if I make the vector like this: gVec = vector<int>(); gVec.reserve(50000000); // push_back default values Yes it definitiely makes a difference Using push_back() to fill in the default values may turn out a lot less efficient. To have the same operations as with done with the constructor vector<int>(50000000, ...


3

You will greatly enhance what you learn from this question by stepping through the two options in the debugger - seeing what the std::vector source code does should be instructive if you can mentally filter out a lot of the initially-confusing template and memory allocation abstractions. Demystify this for yourself - the STL is just someone else's code, and ...


3

I assumed that since I named the new StringBuilder/StringBuffer object the same name, it would override the value of the previously initialized sNumber variable No, if you name the StringBuilder the same name as the field, it will hide the field. (The only way to access the field would then be through this.sNumber.) You can solve it without a temporary ...


3

Since one of the constructors is expecting ready-made Morse Code data (so it is more like a "constructor" - literally constructing an object from the data), and the other has to do some conversion, it might make more sense to make a static factory method called something like convert: /* * Constructor that takes the Morse Code as a String as a parameter ...


3

def someClass = new SomeClass(a) your def defines a method. Invoking the method calls new SomeCLass(a). for (i <- 1 to 3) { someClass.getData(i) } Your for loop calls the someClass method three times. Each of those invocations calls new SomeClass(a). The constructor calls init each time. someClass then returns the new instance, and getData is ...


3

The Generic Types are at wrong places public class Stock<E> { private ArrayList<E> list; public Stock() { this.list= new ArrayList<E>(); } public void add(E item) { this.list.add(item); } }


3

Well, As I can't comment because of my reputation, I write an answer instead Your Song class has an constructor that takes a pointer to the Album class so assume that you have the following code: Album* album = new Album(); Song song = new Song(album); In the first line you create a new album and in the second line you create a new song with the ...


2

There is a difference, and that difference lies in the prototype of the object you returned. The second way, with new makes an object that inherits from the prototype of the MakeMe function, while the first one with {} just creates a stand-alone object that is not related to MakeMe at all. I've show that in two simplified examples. function ...


2

Mainly used for copy constructor. An example can be as follows: Like C++, Java also supports copy constructor. But, unlike C++, Java doesn’t create a default copy constructor if you don’t write your own. class Complex { private double re, im; // A normal parametrized constructor public Complex(double re, double im) { this.re = ...


2

For details about how a name lookup works in C++ see section 3.4 in the standard. In the case you described the basic idea is this: for an unqualified name (like Box your code), the compiler starts searching for a declaration in the current scope before moving up. When it finds a declaration for that name, any declaration, it stops. So in your case, when ...


2

I suppose in theory the constructor could start by allocating a small block of memory and expanding several times before returning, at least for types that didn't have side-effects in their copy constructor. This would be allowed only because there were no observable side effects of doing so though, not because the standard does anything to allow it ...


2

The no-argument constructor is calling the other constructor with arguments with the following line: this("JJ", 0);


2

reserve solely allocates storage. No initialization is performed. Applied on an empty vector it should result in one call to the allocate member function of the allocator used. The constructor shown allocates the storage required and initializes every element to zero: It's semantically equivalent to a reserve and a row of push_back's. In both cases no ...


2

instanceof checks an object to see if it was likely to have been constructed via the given constructor function. That prologue is there to handle the case where someone calls the MyClass constructor function without using new. It means you can use MyClass the way it's meant to be used: var c = new MyClass(); ...or without new: var c = MyClass(); In the ...


2

The problem is that your constructor does nothing. You should use this.name = name


2

Your problem is the specificity of the new operator. Your code basically behaves like this: var macintosh = (new get_type("a"))("red") Create an object of type get_type and then pass a parameter to it. What you want is this: var macintosh = new (get_type("a"))("red") First get the constructor, then use it.



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