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1

Let's look at the various variations of your example one after the other. The original example calling f(e0). enum E {e0, e1}; template<typename T> struct A { A(); // (1) explicit A(unsigned long); // (2) A(T); // (3) }; struct B { B(); // (4) B(E); // (5) }; void f(A<short>); // (6) void f(B); // (7) void g(E); // (8) ...


1

Pass a Func. Let the child decide what to do with that variable: class Foo<T> { T variable; string parameter; public Foo(Func<string, T> action) { variable = action(parameter); } }


0

I am not sure what exactly you want to do at the end but you have a class with number of methods. You can use the following: this.methodName.bind(this, x, y, z and so on...)


0

I hope this sample of code might help you helping me ;-). First of all, I'm jumping into the main method. Then an object of class B is created by using following code: new B(global::Test.Properties.Resources.MyPlane, 100, 100, 200, 100, 10, 10); Then I'm coming to the constructor of B with following arguments (no execution yet): public B(Bitmap ...


0

This is a variation on the so-called "robot legs" problem. As the comment above asks, the right solution really depends on where the decision is made. Here's how I would solve this problem in this case: public final class StringFileWriter implements IResponsesStorage { private final File file; // Note: constructor is not annotated with @Inject ...


0

Just for fun I decided to do this in C# static void Main(string[] args) { Rectangle rect = new Rectangle();//length 2, width 1 Rectangle yourRect = new Rectangle(12.34, 25.022); Console.WriteLine(rect.area() + " area of puny rect\n" + yourRect.area() + " area of bigger and better rect"); ...


0

// http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes/ // Classes (I) // Overloading constructors #include <cstdlib> // contains EXIT_SUCCESS, EXIT_FAILURE #include <iostream> // cout // define class class Rectangle { int width, height; public: Rectangle ( ); // default constructor Rectangle ( int, int ); // ...


1

//Rectangle class class Rectangle{ private int length; private int width; Rectangle(){ this.length=1; // assuming default length=1 this.width=1; // assuming default width=1 } Rectangle(int length, int width){ this.length=length; this.width=width; } int area(){ return length*width; } int perimeter(){ return ...


0

If there is NO overloading, how can one have different constructor functions for the Date() object? var d = new Date(); var d = new Date(milliseconds); var d = new Date(dateString); var d = new Date(year, month, day, hours, minutes, seconds, milliseconds); these are all legal ways to create a new Date() instance.


2

The parameter, w, of function doSomeWork is a Widget that you have created as a parameter in the line doSomeWork(Widget(15)); doSomeWork expected a Widget and one has been explicitly supplied using the constructor you have listed. No compiler supplied copy constructor is used because the doSomeWork(const Widget &w) signature uses pass by reference ...


2

It means that the constructor calls another constructor of the same class. Which constructor is called depends on int signature. In this case this(0) will call the only matching constructor, BankAccount(decimal initialBalance), since 0 can be passed as decimal.


4

Your guess is correct, this(0) is calling the BankAccount(decmial) constructor. The reason you might create two is to give the consumer of your class a choice. If they have a value they can use the BackAccount(decimal) constructor, if they don't care they can save themselves a few seconds by using the BankAccount() constructor and it will initialize the ...


3

In the context here, it means "when the constructor public BankAccount() is called, execute the other constructor, matching the signature. The 0 matches public BankAccount(decimal initialBalance), causing that constructor to be called as well. The keyword this can be applied in other context as well, but it always refers to the current instance of the ...


1

Your code is legal and should work. The fact you've got the error means one of: You've posted not all the code You use broken/modified jre. I looked at your error that states No enclosing instance of type A is available due to some intermediate constructor invocation. So I suppose there are some constructors declared in your code. Possible ...


2

JLabel enterYourBalance = new JLabel("Current Balance:"); JTextField textBoxToEnterBalance = new JTextField(0); ... int balance = Integer.parseInt(enterYourBalance.getText().trim());` enterYourBalance.getText().trim() will return "Current Balance:" and parsing it to int fail. Change to textBoxToEnterBalance.getText().trim() to get the text from the text ...


0

int balance = Integer.parseInt(enterYourBalance.getText().trim()); enterYourBalance is JLabel object Edit like this int balance = Integer.parseInt(textBoxToEnterBalance .getText().trim()); Try to get value from JTextField Not from JLabel


0

You need member variables which will hold the number of each items ordered in each order. A std::vector is the best choice for this. While you get the input, calculate the cost for the order and add it to the total cost. Here is a working example. Notice the class declaration : class Register { std::vector<int> hammers ; // number of hammers ...


0

You ask to parse from enterYourBalance but your JTextField is textBoxToEnterBalance. In your code replace the corresponding line by: int balance = Integer.parseInt(textBoxToEnterBalance.getText().trim());


0

You are using non-static subclasses, which require references to outer instances. If you don't need their non-staticness just add the static keyword to the inner classes' definitions. I'm not sure why the given example isn't working for you though.


0

sorry for short answer ... first add a member to save the table size inside the costructor RealBox::RealBox(int s, float a) { m_reals = new float[s]; for (int i=0; i < s; i++) { m_reals[i] = a; } m_realCount = s; } then replace : RealBox::RealBox(const RealBox& rhs) { m_reals = new float[m_boxsize]; *this = rhs.m_reals; // << this ...


1

This line: *this = rhs.m_reals; Attempts to assign a float* to a RealBox object. The two types are incompatible. Second, you failed to initialize m_boxsize when you constructed the object. What you want to do is this: RealBox::RealBox(const RealBox& rhs) { m_boxsize = rhs.boxsize; m_reals = new float[m_boxsize]; for (int i = 0; i < ...


0

OK, so it seems there are some improvements to the efficiency which could be made (certainly), that "industrial strength" has some implications though nothing concrete (possibly the problem...), or that the constructor was incorrectly named in the question (also possible). In any case, no one has jumped on some glaring omission that I made to my constructor ...


0

Your code has several issues: accuracy: on 10 000 iterations, you obtain 0.2535. That's an error of 5 on 10000. With a rate of 0.253 I'd expect a maximum error of 4 on 10000. discontinuity: when handling overflow you restart index abrubtly with 0. So there will be a noticeable discontinuity. But of course, overall, it will be neglectible ...


3

What you have is far more complex than necessary. All you need to do is keep track of the current position, and return true when it goes past the threshold. struct deterministic_sample { double sampRate; double position; deterministic_sample() : sampRate(0.1), position(0.0) { } void deterministic_rate( double rate ) { ...


1

Use unsigned and integer overflow is a well-defined wraparound. This is very fast on normal CPU's. The second problem I see is the mix of floating-point and integer math. That's not really efficient. It may be more efficient to store multiple as a member and just do multiple += rate. This saves you one integer to double conversion. However, the fmod is ...


1

Nothing wrong with the chaining constructors per se, the error you get is related to other code instantiating it with 2 specific paramaters which their is no specific constructor provided. You need to add another 2 parameter constructor which matches that signature to fix that error.


0

You should conceptually split your linked list into two classes: Container Node Linked List Container The container contains a pointer to the first node, often called the head, and optionally, a pointer to the last node, often called the tail: class Linked_List { Node * head; Node * tail; public: Linked_List : head(nulptr), tail(nulptr) { ; } ...


1

This constructor IntList::IntList(){ IntListNode* sentinel = new IntListNode(); } makes no sense. There is declared local variable sentinel that will be destroyed at once after exiting the constructor. And this constructor IntListNode::IntListNode(){ data = -1; next = this; prev = this; } is very confusing. It would be better not to ...


0

I have got your code to work, by putting the 2 classes into there own class files and I also changed this method toString() name, because there is already a built in method called toString(). So I changed it to string() and it seems to work. TestTriangle Class: import java.util.Scanner; public class TestTriangle{ public static void main(String [] args){ ...


2

As an expression, ref is an lvalue, as is any expression that names a variable of any type. So it will bind to an lvalue reference (for the copy constructor), but not an rvalue reference (for the move constructor). Using std::move (or an equivalent cast expression) gives an rvalue expression that denotes to the object. This will bind to an rvalue reference, ...


0

the easiest way to use and understand multiple constructors: <?php class A { function __construct() { $a = func_get_args(); $i = func_num_args(); if (method_exists($this,$f='__construct'.$i)) { call_user_func_array(array($this,$f),$a); } } function __construct1($a1) { ...


0

This is the expected behavior, because member initialization takes place before the body of the constructor. For realizing this, it is helpful to add the member initializers as well: template<typename T> struct B { A a; T b; B() : a(), b() { std::cout<<"B()"<<std::endl; } }; To fully grasp the ...


1

First of all, let's analyze what you have here: you have an object Test of class B<B<B<int> > >, which is: class B<B<B<int> > > { A a; B<B<int> > b; }; the second field of Test, Test.b is of class B<B<int> >, which is: class B<B<int> > { A a; B<int> b; }; then ...


0

You can also do just like this: Task.Run(() => this.FunctionAsync()).Wait();


0

Your constructor and AsyncTask are called twice because public Object instantiateItem(ViewGroup container, int position) method is called twice. How many times the above method is called depend on the return value of public int getCount() method. In your case you are returning imgURLS.length which is 2.


0

first thing executed is main method in your GradeBookTest class. there you have written String name; name = input.nextLine(); so name will get value and it will store it in constant pool. while creating object you are passing the value to name to constructor in line GradeBook gradeBook1 = new GradeBook(name, teacher); name's value will be assign to ...


0

You can use a factory method that acts like a constructor, but actually returns an anonymous subclass of the main class. The methods of the anonymous subclass can access the factory method parameters as long as they are declared final. So this technique can only be used for fields that never change. import java.util.Date; abstract class Quiz{ static ...


2

No there is not, but you should refer to the builder approach since there are a lot of parameters / arguments to the constructor in there. The builder would make the object creation readable, less error prone and assists in thread safety as well. Take a look at When would you use the Builder Pattern? for details and samples.


4

Unfortunately there is no simpler way to initialize instance variable - you have to write such initialization code in a constructor. However all modern IDE (like IntelliJ IDEA, Eclipse, etc.) can generate such constructors automatically based on instance variables, so you don't have to write such code manually. (For instance in IntelliJ IDEA press ...


0

class Exception { public Exception(string message) { [...] } } class MyExceptionClass : Exception { public MyExceptionClass(string message, string extraInfo) : base(message) { [...] } }


0

OK. The solution is to define SWIG_CSHARP_NO_IMCLASS_STATIC_CONSTRUCTOR preprocessor in the SWIG command line: SWIG.EXE -Wall -DSWIG_CSHARP_NO_IMCLASS_STATIC_CONSTRUCTOR -c++ -csharp ... This will tell SWIG NOT to generate the default static constructor in the intermediary class. Then use the following code in SWIG interface file to add a custom ...


0

I think maybe RVO. return value optimization


1

It's called RVO (Return value optimization) and it's a well know optimization the compiler is allowed to make in similar situations.


2

There is really no magic to pass values from outside to base class constructor - derived class must somehow specify all arguments to base constructor either passing directly or computing in some other way. Usually you'd compute parameters of base constructor from arguments and some constant values: public C(int w, int x, string y, string z) : ...


1

You likely do want to use a different API with better/safer features, but you could mix in a trait on a given instance of Calendar to override some behavior: trait SpecialPrint { self: Calendar => override def toString(): String = self.toInstant().toString + ", " + self.getTimeZone.getDisplayName } val c = new ...


1

You should set the context when you call the function: privateInitFunc.call(this)


0

here is a JsFiddle is that what you need ? for (var key in family) { var obj = family[key]; for (var prop in obj) { alert(prop + " = " + obj[prop]); } } Here is the way to access the properties directly and not with a loop jsFIddle (Method 2, uncomment)


2

Well, you don't have a _popen in your class. If _popen was declared at the class level or was a function in mp.Process, then your code would work because it would grab it off the Process namespace. class Process(object): _popen = None def __init__(...): #stuff, but not involving _popen The assert looks like a guard however and I'll ...


3

When you add your own __init__() here, you are overriding the __init__() in the superclass. However, the superclass often (as in this case) has some stuff it needs in its __init__(). Therefore, you either have to re-create that functionality (e.g. initializing _popen as described in your error, among other things), or call the superclass constructor within ...


2

Typically having an initialize method require a whole bunch of arguments usually leads to the use of an options hash rather than splat. With an options hash you're able to dry up your initialize method, set instance variables and attr_readers in a very ruby way: class Animal def initialize(opts = {}) options = defaults.merge(opts) options.each ...



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