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2

This: #include "item.h" #include "item.cpp" // <-- is wrong. You only include header files. The way you get your definitions in is you compile item.cpp and then compile main.cpp and then link them together.


0

for (int i = names.size() - 1; i >= 0; i--){ person = new ListNode(names.get(i), person); } going backward makes it much easier


2

if not valid delete the object Don't. Better, test the email address to be valid before trying to create the user. or return nothing You can't really. Returning nothing from a constructor is effectively quite impossible, except you throw an exception. Use an extra factory function instead: function isValidEmail(str) { // ...


1

The error you are getting is because Color's constructor takes three ints from 0-255 or three floats from 0-1. You are passing three doubles. That constructor doesn't exist. Either way, this is a poor and overcomplicated way to generate a random color. Just do something like this: private static final Random generator = new Random(); public static Color ...


0

Color takes float or int in the constructor arguments


0

The constructor takes floats, not doubles : public Color(float r, float g, float b)


0

You could use try, catch function User(email) { this.email = email; this.checkValid() } User.prototype.checkValid = function () { var valid = false; //or true if valid email if(!valid) throw 'Not valid email'; } try { var user1 = new User("bob123@aol.com"); } catch(e) { console.log(e); } But in my opinion a constructor ...


0

function User(email) { this.email = email; this.check(); }; User.prototype.check = function() { if (this.email.match(/^[a-z0-9!#$%&\'*+\/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&\'*+\/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?$/ig)) { console.log('Valid email'); } else { ...


1

function createUser(username, email) { if (email.match(/^[a-z0-9!#$%&\'*+\/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&\'*+\/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*@(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?$/ig)) { window[username] = new User(email); return true; } else { return null; } } function ...


1

Given what mike and juan have said, I'd say that class B's implementation is broken iff it requires to be value-initialized like that unless it'd be reasonably expected to behave that way. Generally, given a properly designed class - with a user-provided default constructor iff if has POD members - there should be no difference in behavior between value- ...


3

Yes, you can inherit from A and call the base constructor: class B : A { public B(ref int value): base(ref value) { } } But to be honest, it's the first time I see a constructor with ref/out parameters. Those parameters are used when the method is performing some calculations and modifying the value of the parameter which is not what a ...


14

By including it in the initialiser list, the member is value-initialised. If it weren't, it would be default-initialised. Whether there's a difference depends on the type. If it's a class type with a declared default constructor, then there's no difference: that constructor will be used in either case. Otherwise, value-initialisation will zero-initialise ...


14

Initializing the member in the initializer list value-initializes it. Omitting it from the list default-initializes it, If B is a non-aggregate and has a default constructor, there is no difference. If B is an aggregate, then there may be a difference. default-initializing it means if it contains built-ins these may not get initialized. value-initializing ...


0

This post was, in fact, not about NodeJs, but about hoisting (thanks Alexey Ten) Good explanation: http://www.adequatelygood.com/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting.html Having used languages such as C, C++, Java, PHP, Perl, Tcl, Python or GO, I expected JavaScript to behave the same way, regarding variable declaration. If a variable is not declared before ...


1

As has already been shown here, there are many ways of declaring multiple constructors in PHP, but none of them are the correct way of doing so (since PHP technically doesn't allow it). But it doesn't stop us from hacking this functionality... Here's another example: <?php class myClass { public function __construct() { $get_arguments ...


0

Because bars is not initialized, whenever you call f.getBars() it returns a null object. When you try to call .add() on a null object, you get a NullPointerException. Change private ArrayList<Bar> bars; to private ArrayList<Bar> bars = new ArrayList<Bar>(); or add public Foo(){this.bars = new ArrayList<Bar>();} to your Foo ...


1

I realize what is happening here (the constructor is not finished, so this returns null), but how can I avoid this? Your diagnosis is incorrect. The value of this can never be null. And that includes in a constructor. The JLS (15.8.3) states the following: "The keyword this may be used only in the body of an instance method or default method, or ...


0

For those, who may find this via Google (like me...), I developed the original solution further for a better common usage: var myObject = function() {}; // hint: Chrome debugger will name the created items 'myObject' var object = (function(myself, parent) { return function(myself, parent) { if(parent){ myself.prototype ...


0

First off, to understand classes, prototype, constructors etc. in JavaScript (this seems to be what you are heading for), I can recommend the free book (which you can also buy as paperback): http://eloquentjavascript.net/. You should take the time to dig into this, the concepts are somewhat different than what you might be coming from (language-wise). I ...


1

Xotic has provided a fine answer, but another interesting way you could do this is to have your function generate other functions that carry out the work: function makeDomUpdater(bg, color, size, margin, content) { return function(element){ element.style.backgroundColor = bg; element.style.color = color; element.style.fontSize = size; ...


1

Not really sure why you want to do it this way, but a possibility. function Interface(bg, color, size, margin, content) { this.bg = bg; this.color = color; this.size = size; this.margin = margin; this.content = content; } Interface.prototype.implement = function (element) { element.style.backgroundColor = this.bg; ...


3

It's not the MyInteger(s) that's the problem. It constructs that temporary object. It's the attempt to return this temporary object that is the problem. You are returning by value, which means that a copy needs to be made, yet your copy constructor takes a MyInteger&, which is unable to bind to temporary objects (rvalues). Your copy constructor should ...


0

The problem is not specially with virtual functions but more generally with inheritance. As buffer is an array of A, when you write : B b; buffer[0] = b; you first construct a B object (first line), and later construct an A object using its copy constructor initialized with b (second line). So when you later call buffer[0].virtual_function() you actually ...


2

Your non-virtual functions "work" (a relative term) because they need no vtable lookup. Under the hood is implementation-dependent, but consider what is needed to execute a non-virtual member. You need a function pointer, and a this. The latter is obvious, but where does the fn-ptr come from? its just a plain function call (expecting a this, then any ...


1

new char[...] This does not construct object T (does not calls constructor). Virtual table is created during construction.


0

Constructors append implicit conversion. To suppress this implicit conversion it is required to declare a constructor with a parameter explicit. In C++11 you can also specify an "operator type()" with such keyword http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/explicit With such specification you can use operator in terms of explicit conversions, and direct ...


1

In your case: SuperClass constructor will be called by default. When Java process: new SubClass(). It will call constructor of SuperClass first. When constructor of SuperClass is being called - Value return from implicitValue() will be assigned to superClassValue - The method implicitValue() being called is the method Of SubClass (NOT implicitValue() of ...


3

TL;DR Problem is that implicitValue from SubClass is used by superclass implicit SuperClass constructor (super()) via implicitValue() method, before subClassValue = 20; will be executed in SubClass constructor, so it returns default value of subClassValue which for int field is 0. Does the SubClass constructor make use of the SuperClass constructor? ...


-1

The name property will be set in the function Person(...). You can see this by trying something like var bar = function eigor(){} and then seeing what bar.name is.


1

Yes, the subclass constructor implicitly calls the superclass constructor if such a call is not explicitly given. But it prints 0 because of the fact that the implicitValue method is overridden in SubClass. The superclass constructor is called. Here, the SuperClass part of the object is created. All variables are initialized. Because there is no ...


-1

It sounds like something is wrong with your Override method or subclass. Because it sounds like when it is implements a variable the value is not getting instantiated so it is defaulting to 0 and then when you remove it the super class takes over resulting in you getting the value 10.


2

Nothing at all, other than the constructor function being "named". For #1, Person.name would evaluate to an empty string, and for #2, Person.name would evaluate to "Person".


-1

The getValue() returns at the end the superClassValue value which is this case is not initialized.


1

I'll try to explain it at byte code level and see if that helps. AbstractService.java public abstract class AbstractService { protected int id = 10; public abstract void verify(); } Service.java public class Service extends AbstractService{ public static void main(String[] args) { Service service = new Service(); ...


1

I'm not expert of Qt but there is something that doesn't sound good to me in terms of C++. Mainly a function in your code is returning a "char * " pointer instead of a "const char*", I'm talking about these lines: char *titl,*auth,*pub; int pri,stockp; titl=ui->title->toPlainText().toLatin1().data(); If the data was directly provided by ...


2

titl=ui->title->toPlainText().toLatin1().data(); This is probably the issue: toLatin1() returns a new QByteArray which owns its data. You assign the internal data pointer of that QByteArray to titl. However, the QByteArray is only a temporary variable and will get destroyed in the next line of code. When the QByteArray gets destroyed, it will free ...


1

It has a default constructor with system out That will happen when you're using a bean management framework which uses proxies, such as CDI (i.e. the bean is annotated with @Named, this is also confirmed by looking at your previous question). It'll during the first-time use create an instance in order to inspect the instance before creating a proxy. All ...


0

Here is a slight cleaner way that I finally used class Foo( val propertyFile: String ) extends Bar with Baz with Zot trait Bar extends Properties { private val something = getProperty("Something") } trait Baz extends Properties { private val somethingElse = getProperty("SomethingElse") } trait Zot extends Properties { private val somethingWeird = ...


0

Here is an example that reveals the logical problems that can occur when calling an overridable method in the super constructor. class A { protected int minWeeklySalary; protected int maxWeeklySalary; protected static final int MIN = 1000; protected static final int MAX = 2000; public A() { setSalaryRange(); } protected void ...


0

You should be able to use the @ignore directive to achieve this. From the docs: The @ignore tag indicates that a symbol in your code should never appear in the documentation. This tag takes precedence over all others. http://usejsdoc.org/tags-ignore.html


1

ReaderValue::ReaderValue(ReaderValue && other) { //other here is a lvalue(has a name) referring to a rvalue //move alloc however takes a rvalue moveAlloc(other); } that is why you have to cast your lvalue to a rvalue explicitely moveAlloc(std::move(other)); //other now is a rvalue please note that all std::move does is effectively a ...


1

Suggest you to read this http://thbecker.net/articles/rvalue_references/section_05.html it'll will tell you why. In a short, c++ regards parameter other in ReaderValue as a lvalue, but the parameter other in moveAlloc is a rvalue. So you have to convert other in ReaderValue to a rvalue when you call moveAlloc.


1

I'd recommmend to use the Function constructor instead of eval (though you could do the same with an evaled IEFE). That way, you get a "module" scope for free don't collide with the scopes of the loader function can pass arguments with arbitrary names (new Function("exports", ressourceCode))(ressourceObject);


1

The difference between .call and .apply is that .call takes its arguments as separate arguments for the function, while .apply takes the arguments as a single array. For example: function myFunction(x, y) { var z; // Do something return z; } var context = {}; // The following function calls are equivalent: var fx = myFunction.call(context, 5, ...


2

As seen in the following article https://blog.engineyard.com/2015/mastering-this-in-javascript and following discussion in comments, a possible solution would be to store this in a variable higher in the scope to use it in the callback. Therefore a possible solution could be : Library.Module = function () { var _this = this; _this.resources = ...


1

Lets say for example we define the abstract class "car". Then we write a subclass, "honda" extending "car". In order to make a "honda", you must first make a "car". Regardless of whether or not "car" was abstract, in order to make any subclass object, you have to call super() to "make" the superclass object first. See my answer to a similar question here: ...


0

Calling the abstract class constructor is a technique used to enforce class invariants or some class constraints.


2

Calling a constructor in an abstract class would only be used to setup attributes that are specific to that abstract class - which would otherwise be tedious to setup in each implementation of the abstract class. This ability removes boiler plate code. In the example below, see how determining the lifetime of the car could be calculated based on other ...


4

If you call super in a subclass, the superclass constructor will run (and thus create an object of that class??) then how come you can accually call super in a subclass of an abstract class? This part is wrong. When you call super in the subclass constructor, you're just telling to the subclass that it first has to execute the initialization code from ...


1

What about early initialization? trait A { val f: String val a = "I would have used " + f } trait B { val f: String val b = "I would have used " + f + " too!" } class C extends { val f = "the string" } with A with B If you throw this into a REPL: scala> List(c.a, c.b).map(println _) I would have used the string I would have used the string ...



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