Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Yes, it's completely normal for PHP because PHP is interpreted programing language. So, PHP code is interpreted by a web server with a PHP processor module each time you request (for example when you refresh page) a server. You should read more about Symfony2 and HTTP Fundamentals


2

In the standard library, certain containers "fill in" values using the default constructor when the value is not given explicitly. vector<Point> temp(10) initializes the vector with 10 elements, which are filled with the default-constructed value of your type. But when you have defined this constructor: Point(int x, int y, Uint8 r, Uint8 g, Uint8 b) : ...


1

According to c++ standard a default constructor is the one which can be called without arguments.It is also the reason for your quesrion.


1

Instance variables are resolved on the declared type of the reference. Object does not have an x instance field. The proper cast is ((CastTest)theTestObj).x // this whole expression is of type CastTest which seems to have a field x What you have, this (CastTest) theTestObj.x; is equivalent to (CastTest) (theTestObj.x) which has the same issue ...


0

Problems that I see: Default constructor of Person. Person(const char * id,int nb) { this->id=id; this->next=NULL; } If I use Person foo() { char id[] = "John"; return Person(id, 0); } Person a = foo(); Then the stack memory used for holding "John" in foo is now held on to by a, which will lead to undefined behavior. You need to take ...


1

This code must be fixed: for (int i = 0 ; i < size; ++i) autre.table[i] = new Person(*array[i]); table has fixed size, and it's filled with null-pointers. In your loop, you don't check if the element to be copied is a null-pointer, so you derefence it and try to copy the entity which even doesn't exist. for (int i = 0 ; i < size; ++i) { ...


0

this refers to the current object, in this case it is the ConstructorTrial class that is being referenced. For methods inside the same class, you wouldn't need to specify this.methodName();, instead you would just do methodName. However, when you call the constructor itself, you need this to specify the name of the method, which would be the constructor, so ...


0

(10,10,10) has no run condition, there is nothing to execute, there are just integers. this(10,10,10) says construct me using these parameters. Constructors know when to be called based on the parameters they take. Just as with normal functions, you can have multiple with the same name, but as soon as they all take the exact same arguments, you start ...


0

Inside constructor, this(..) is call another constructor of the class it self, it should be the first clause in the caller constructor and super(..) is call a constructor of super class, If you are new to java, try buy "thinking in java 4th" or "core java 8th".


0

Removing this from this(10,10,10); would just be (10,10,10); which isn't legal Java. The this is necessary to call another constructor. The reason it prints 101010 is that you have added 10 to "The Color is:", resulting in "The Color is:10". Then you added another 10, yielding "The Color is:1010", then you added a third 10, yielding "The Color ...


0

(10,10,10); would not make much sense actually, so the compiler will complain that it can not understand what you are trying to do. this(10,10,10) look for a Constructor with 3 int params, which you have, thus the compiler is happy. You can think about as a method call (notice that this is incorrect, but you can think about it like this), do you ...


0

You could trying calling the Windows APIs and ask for how much memory is available using the GlobalMemoryStatusEx function. See here for more details: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa366589%28v=vs.85%29.aspx


0

Operating systems will give you as much memory as you want until your process's address space is full. It will not stop when it runs out of physical memory. This means that there is no way to calculate how much physical memory your computer has by allocating memory, and that allocations will not fail even if your computer is out of physical memory. The ...


5

The memory should be allocated dynamically You don't need to test the available memory - operator new does that for you (unless it's overloaded of course). If operator new fails, it either throws std::bad_alloc, or returns 0, depending on the version of the operator you call.


2

You can write a templated mat class: template<typename T> class mat { //matrix constructor mat(int nrows,int ncols) { this->nrows=nrows; this->ncols=ncols; this->dat=new T *[nrows]; // ^ for(int i=0;i<nrows;i++){ this->dat[i]=new T[ncols]; // ^ ...


2

It seems that you declatred the copy constructor of class Bar the following way Bar( Bar & ); But you need to declare it as Bar( const Bar & ); if you want to use as an argument a temporary object because temporary objects may not be bound to non-const references.


2

Temporaries cannot be bound to references unless they are references-to-const.


2

All members are initialised before the constructor body begins. If one doesn't have an entry in the initialiser list, then it will be default-initialised; but this is only possible (for a class type) if it has a default constructor. expr is not initialised in the initialiser list, and doesn't have a default constructor (since declaring any constructor ...


3

A default constructor will only be automatically generated by the compiler if no other constructors are defined. EDIT: The default constructor is needed for object initialization.


7

C++11 §12.1 Constructors A default constructor for a class X is a constructor of class X that can be called without an argument. This is the definition of default constructor. A constructor that supplies default arguments for all its parameters can be called without argument, thus fits the definition.


1

The feature of constructor overload allow the compiler to infer which constructor to call based on the passed arguments. The default constructor is just the constructor which is resolved for no arguments, as in A a; or A a=A(); And again due to parameters overloading only a single constructor can be resolved for each set. So, if all parameters have ...


4

By definition, a default constructor is one that can be called without arguments. Yours cleary fits that definition, since both parameters have default value. The asnwer to "why" is, I'd say, simply because C++ standard says so. The choice of constructor to be called is done by overload resolution based on number and types of parameters, just like with ...


0

if you don't use default constructor example: abstract class Animal{ string name; public Animal(string name){ this.name = name; } } class Dog extends Animal{ int age; //call constructor of superclass public Dog(int age, string name) { super(name); this.age = age; } }


2

If Animal has a no-arg constructor, then Animal's subclasses will call it automatically. Otherwise, the compiler will complain. In such a case, you have to call super() explicitly with the appropriate parameters for the Animal constructor you wish to use.


1

Yes , The constructor of an abstract class can be called. why not? Use super() from subclass to call the super class argument constructor(s). If you dont use super(), then by default the no-arg constructor of super class will be called. If you call Dog dog = new Dog(); By default the super class default constructor[no-arg constructor] will be called. ...


1

If I remember correctly, the abstract class's constructor (only the default constructor) is called by default only in the instance of the default constructor. To call the other constructors of the inherited class, a super() call needs to be made inside the constructors of the subclass.


0

An example code: class Book { public function __construct() { $registry = RegistrySingleton::getInstance(); $this->_database = $registry->database; // or global $databaseConnection; $this->_database = $database; } } class Book { private $_databaseConnection; public function ...


1

There is also some great explaination about your question: http://www.potstuck.com/2009/01/08/php-dependency-injection/


1

Generally you would use constructors to set values if your class cannot exist or doesn't make sense without the value. If the value is allowed to be changed, than add a setter. If it should never be changed after construction, then don't add a setter.


1

Try this website. It explains all with examples. http://ralphschindler.com/2012/03/09/php-constructor-best-practices-and-the-prototype-pattern


2

I don't think there's a language feature for it, but you can implement this as a helper mixin: https://github.com/CyberShadow/ae/blob/master/utils/meta/misc.d#L219-L267


0

You need to copy the elements yourself. public Grid copyGrid (Grid grid) { Grid newGrid = new Grid(height, width); for (int row = 0; row < height; row++) { for (int col = 0; col < width; col++) { newGrid.getArray()[row][col] = grid.getArray()[row][col]; } } return newGrid; }


1

You need to make sure you have access to all the data of the Grid object (i.e. getters and setters are available). Depending on the type of methods you have, your code could look like this for example. public Grid copyGrid(Grid grid) { Grid g = new Grid(grid.getHeight(), grid.getWidth()); for (int row = 0; row < height; row++) { for (int ...


0

As has already been said, Lazy initialization can help you by postponing the moment when you have to initialize the list (and therefore choose its initial size). If Lazy initialization is not possible because of your department policy that does not allow to initialize with null an object (for which I do not find much sense), a workaround might be to ...


4

Premature optimisation is the root of all evil. - D. Knuth. This seems like the kind of "performance issue" which actually never has any effect on performance. For one thing, how sure are you that these empty lists are actually initialised? I suspect that most modern compilers delay initialisation of objects until they know for sure that there will be a ...


0

ArrayList utilizes processor cache a lot and actually is so fast, that you don't need to optimize it any furter. Still, if you have to create millions of tiny ArrayList instances it may worth thinking of reworking your overall design and not bother about default AL capacity.


0

I tent to disagree that these optimisation are bad. If you declare an arraylist that holds n elements (8-th by default if Im not mistaken), and you put one more, then arraylist, internally will double the size it holds. When you remove this element later, the list will not decrease.


2

If the list is not always used use lazy initialization private List<Widget> widgets; private List<Widget> getList() { if (widgets == null) { widgets = new ArrayList<>(); } return widgets; }


1

If you set it to 0 the ArrayList will have to resize anyhow, so really you're shooting yourself in the foot. The only time you would benefit from an explicit declaration of size would be if you already know the maximum bounds that you will be reaching in your list. As stated, this is a micro-optimization, it's more likely you will find other things that you ...


0

Constructors can be used for efficient memory management, which is not possible with functions. Destructor can be used to destroy the constructors when not needed. Moreover, the use of copy constructor is known to prevent difficulties or errors due to memory mis happenings.


0

I finally found the origin of the problem, it was due to a bad use of #include. Removing the line #include "B.hpp" in A.hpp solves the problem. The A header only needs a forward declaration of class B, since it uses only a pointer to this class. I conclude I had a circular header reference. I thought that using friend requires to include the header of the ...


2

The Vec class would have other members that you didn't show: T *data; T *avail; T *limit; You seem to not realize that these variables exist; but you could find them by looking in the same place that you found the rest of the definition of Vec that you posted. The syntax for constructor initializers (the stuff after the :) is a list of name(value). The ...


0

Nice suggestions from @Braj @JonSkeet I implemented something like below import java.util.HashMap; class ClassCounter{ private static HashMap<Class<?>, Integer> mapClassCount= new HashMap<>(); public static void increment(Class<?> clz){ Integer cnt = mapClassCount.get(clz); if(cnt == null){ cnt ...


1

I suggest you to use initialization block in case of multiple constructor otherwise you have to repeat your code in each constructor. Sample code: public class A { private static int counter = 0; // initialization block { if (this.getClass() == A.class) { counter++; } } public A() { } public A(int ...


0

Edit: Before reading, I just saw someone else's answer which helps in a similar way. This way doesn't use reflection. As everyone else said, you shouldn't be worrying about your subclasses within your superclass. If you really wanted to have some kind of control like this: public class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { B b = new ...


4

Well it would be better to avoid checking the name: if (this.getClass() == A.class) Beyond that, you could consider using a protected constructor - but that would still be accessible within the same package. Normally, the best solution is not to need this anyway - if your design really needs to know whether the object you're constructing is "just an A" ...


0

Made this for doing c++ callbacks via JNI: public class NativeRunnable implements Runnable { //stdFunctionPointer is a C++ pointer to a std::function<void ()>, cast to int64_t so that Java can hold it. public NativeRunnable(long stdFunctionPointer) { this.stdFunctionPointer = stdFunctionPointer; } @Override public void ...


0

Recently I ran into a scenario where I needed to calculate some logic before passing the result into base. I could just do something like public SomeConstructor: base(FlagValue == FlagValues.One || FlagValues.Two ? "OptionA" : "OptionB") { } But I find that to be ugly, and can get really long horizontally. So I opted instead to use Func Anonymous ...


1

Final field semantics is different from 'normal' field semantics. An example, We play a network game. Lets make a Game object retrieving data from the network and a Player object that Listens to events from the game to act accordingly. The game object hides all the network details, the player is only interested in events: import java.util.*; import ...



Top 50 recent answers are included