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2

I suspect the problem is that it's an inner class... so it doesn't actually have a parameterless constructor. Instead, it has two constructors, one of which takes a reference to an instance of the enclosing class, and one of which takes a reference to an instance of the enclosing class and an int. If you make it just a nested class by adding the static ...


1

Use $this-> instead of self:: Self is for static members and this is for instance variables.


0

Use should declare your properties with keyword static, e.g. static private $id = 0;


10

Quoting C++11: 5.2.3 Explicit type conversion (functional notation) [expr.type.conv] 2 The expression T(), where T is a simple-type-specifier or typename-specifier for a non-array complete object type or the (possibly cv-qualified) void type, creates a prvalue of the specified type,which is value-initialized (8.5; no initialization is done for the ...


8

(All quotes in the first section are from N3337, C++11 FD with editorial changes) I cannot reproduce the behavior with the VC++ on rextester. Presumably the bug (see below) is already fixed in the version they are using, but not in yours - @Drop reports that the latest release, VS 2013 Update 4, fails the assertion - while the VS 2015 preview passes them. ...


0

Contructors are not methods. One of the key feature of a method is that it should have a return type (event if it is 'void'). Here, you do not need to explicitly call the constructor again. The functionality you implement in the constructor will be executed at instantiation itself. However, this is not recommended and is bug-prone. You should only be ...


0

You cannot call constructors like regular methods. The constructor is automatically called when you create an instance of a class,i.e,when you do ID3 instance = new ID3("data.txt", 5 , 14 , "", 5);


1

You are already calling the constructor here - ID3 instance = new ID3("data.txt", 5 , 14 , "", 5);. You can't call it as a regular method. Just remove the instance.ID3("data.txt", 5 , 14 , "", 5); line.


0

If your DBHelper child then this post help, othervise you can allready understandfirst Define it like this one in outside of you class, means uperside... private DBHelper ourHelper; private final Context ourContext; Then use this class DbHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper { public DBHelper(Context context) { super(context, DB_NAME, null, ...


1

You need to define an explicit constructor yourself that calls the 4- or 5-arg super constructor in SQLiteOpenHelper. For example: public DbHelper(Context context) { super(context, "database.db", null, 1); } where database.db is your database file name and 1 is the version.


0

First of all it will give compile time error (because if you are having argument-constructor in child class then you must have no -arg constructor in base class) and second that compiler will implicitly call no-arg constructor of base class(if no other call to super class constructor or child class constructor). so you should not write super(); so you ...


0

This program will give a compile time error. It is necessary to include a default constructor Top() in the class Top


0

your super class constructor contains 1 string parameter, and you are not calling your super class with parameter in the code super(); should be like this super("any string");


3

The call to super() implies that there is a default constructor in the base class. Your example does not show that so therefore the code does not compile. So, in order for this to work properly simply add call in the subclass like this: public Bottom2(String s) { super(s); // call to superclass constructor with parameters. ...


2

You are calling super(), and not super(s). When you have a parameterized constructor, you can no longer use the default no-arg constructor, that's why super() won't compile.


0

If you truly need only a single instance of type b, then why are you dealing with it as part of the construction on an A? It should be a class member of class B, and you can get it from class B whenever you need it. An instance of class A doesn't need its own pointer to b. (And it wouldn't make sense for it to have its own instance of b, since there's only ...


0

After further digging in Backbone.js, I've found the answer. Turns out there's no need for any additional coding. var SHUser = Parse.Object.extend("_User", { /** * Instance properties go in an initialize method */ initialize: function (attr, options) { }, }, { // Class methods }); It's a backbone.js model, so when initializing, just pass ...


2

What is a default constructor ? It is a constructor that is added by the compiler if you have not defined a constructor. If your class has a constructor already then the compiler will not add the default constructor. So in your case you have the constructor, public Test(){ supper(); this.setSize(200,200); this.setVisible(true); } So ...


3

the default constructor is a constructor that the Java compiler adds to your code if no explicit constructor is available. The default constructor invokes the super class constructor with no args. If you have added your own constructor (no matter whether it's without parameters or with parameters) the compiler will not add the default constructor in this ...


11

The default constructor is a no-args constructor that the Java compiler inserts on your behalf; it contains a default call to super(); (not supper()) which is the default behavior. If you implement any constructor then you no longer receive a default constructor. JLS-8.8.9. Default Constructor says (in part), If a class contains no constructor ...


3

def someClass = new SomeClass(a) your def defines a method. Invoking the method calls new SomeCLass(a). for (i <- 1 to 3) { someClass.getData(i) } Your for loop calls the someClass method three times. Each of those invocations calls new SomeClass(a). The constructor calls init each time. someClass then returns the new instance, and getData is ...


5

If your constructor is explicit and class have no non-explicit constructor, that receives initializer_list<T>, than you cannot copy-list-initialize object of this class. W w = {1,2}; // compiles without explicit, but not with Simple live example Quotes from standard: 8.5/16 — If the initializer is a (non-parenthesized) braced-init-list, the ...


0

Well here's what you should know about following code: class Object{ Object(Object obj){} } Class Object has a constructor which takes a argument of class of type Object. You can use Object as following: class MainClass{ public static void main(String args[]){ Object obj=new Object(new Object()); } } Here an anonymous object of Object ...


0

Basically when a class needs to return an object of its own type when made. class Player{ int jerseyNumber; Player(){ } Player (Player p){ this.jerseyNumber = p.getJerseryNumber(); } int getJerseryNumber(){ return jerseyNumber; } void setJerseyNumber(int jerseyNumber){ this.jerseyNumber = jerseyNumber; } } ...


0

This can be an effective way of duplicating an existing object or modifying one slightly. I once worked on a Checkers board game project where Board and Move were represented as classes. In order to create a new game board the class Board had a constructor that accepted another Board instance as well as a Move instance. The constructor made a new game board ...


0

If you have overloaded constructor, you may pass an object of the class to another constructor in the same class. Class Object{ Object() {} // constructor 1 Object(Object obj){} // constructor 2 } In the above case, you can pass an object created through constructor 1 to constructor 2


2

Mainly used for copy constructor. An example can be as follows: Like C++, Java also supports copy constructor. But, unlike C++, Java doesn’t create a default copy constructor if you don’t write your own. class Complex { private double re, im; // A normal parametrized constructor public Complex(double re, double im) { this.re = ...


4

This does appear to be a bug in MSVC. In all three cases wrapper has no user-provided default constructor, so initialization with wrapper() invokes: (All citations from n3690) (8.5/11) An object whose initializer is an empty set of parentheses, i.e., (), shall be value-initialized. (thanks to dyp), this will result in zero-intialization of int v ...


4

During value-initialization, if T is a class type without a user-provided or deleted default-constructor, then the object is zero-initialized (§8.5/8.2). This is indeed the case with wrapper. Your first example matches the third case for zero-initialization (§8.5/6.1, emphasis mine) — if T is a scalar type (3.9), the object is initialized to the ...


0

When you create an array of objects, the default constructor is used to initialize the objects unless you provide the objects to initialize with in the initialization list. You can use: Animal animals[numberOfAnimals] = {Animal(animalInput), Animal(animalInput), ... 12 times }; However, given how you are using animalInput in the constructor, it won't ...


0

The main(String[]) method has a specific prototype that is dictated by how the Java runtime environment works. When you invoke java MyApplication from the command line, the Java VM will look for a static main(String[]) method contained in that class in order to execute the application. If that method is not found, then the Java VM can't run the class as an ...


3

Well, As I can't comment because of my reputation, I write an answer instead Your Song class has an constructor that takes a pointer to the Album class so assume that you have the following code: Album* album = new Album(); Song song = new Song(album); In the first line you create a new album and in the second line you create a new song with the ...


0

The code is correct, you just have to make sure that the Album instance exists during the lifetime of the Song instances. If the Song::album pointer does not get changed, it might be more clean to use a reference instead. This means that album cannot be made to point to another album after construction. class Song { public: Song(Album& _album) : ...


0

The difference is important at the prototype level. An object in javascript has a prototype chain. In this way you can see an object as an inheritor of each of its prototype. In the first case you have no prototype chain so no possible inheritance. Take a look at: ...


2

There is a difference, and that difference lies in the prototype of the object you returned. The second way, with new makes an object that inherits from the prototype of the MakeMe function, while the first one with {} just creates a stand-alone object that is not related to MakeMe at all. I've show that in two simplified examples. function ...


9

Yes. Get rid of your constructors and use instead some other approach, such as 1) A Factory Method, so you'd have methods like this: class MorseString { private MorseString(){}; public static MorseString getFromCode(String s) { // ... } public static MorseString getFromString(String s) { // ... } } // Usage: ...


3

Since one of the constructors is expecting ready-made Morse Code data (so it is more like a "constructor" - literally constructing an object from the data), and the other has to do some conversion, it might make more sense to make a static factory method called something like convert: /* * Constructor that takes the Morse Code as a String as a parameter ...


3

I assumed that since I named the new StringBuilder/StringBuffer object the same name, it would override the value of the previously initialized sNumber variable No, if you name the StringBuilder the same name as the field, it will hide the field. (The only way to access the field would then be through this.sNumber.) You can solve it without a temporary ...


0

You may be bumping into the problem of "All dimensions must be constants except the leftmost" discussed here. Instead, try the following: class Test { private: int x; int y; int** myArray; public: Test(const int x, const int y) : x(x), y(y) { myArray = new int*[x]; for (int firstDimension = ...


0

you should consider allocating memory with pointers, should be as follows: class Test{ private: int x; int y; int **array; public: Test(const int x, const int y){ int i; this->array = new int*[x]; // first level pointer asignation for(i=0;i<x;i++){ this->array[x] = new int[y]; // second level ...


1

When you say websites[0.name] It will try to get 0's name property, which is not valid. So, you should access it like this websites[i].name websites[i] will refer to the WebSite object in the array, at the index i and you are getting the name property with the . operator. Also, your loop variable should be used in the for loop's condition, like this ...


2

For details about how a name lookup works in C++ see section 3.4 in the standard. In the case you described the basic idea is this: for an unqualified name (like Box your code), the compiler starts searching for a declaration in the current scope before moving up. When it finds a declaration for that name, any declaration, it stops. So in your case, when ...


5

Java is using different namespaces for different types of identifiers. The restricted syntax of Java makes it unambiguous whether you are referring to a type, a function, a variable or a label.


7

Basically, Java has slightly different set of syntax rules, by the sounds of it. When the grammar says you've got a variable declaration with an initializer, such as this: Box box = new Box(); ... it knows that Box has to be the name of a type, not the name of a variable. So it doesn't matter whether or not there's a variable called Box in scope. (That ...


0

Use a static factory method @Entity public class User implements Serializable { private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L; @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO) private Long id; private String name; public User() {} public static User createUser(String name) { User result = new User(); ...


0

Your implementation is not wrong.But you can direct access your variables in the constructor.And you can also use "telescoping constructor pattern". See sample, @Entity public class User implements Serializable { private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L; @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO) private Long id; ...


0

There's no advantage to this strange initialisation-assignment dance, unless you're being paid per character of source code. For a simple, non-constant member, the disadvantages are trivial: that you're writing more code than you need to, and relying on the compiler to notice that the dance can be replaced by a single initialisation (with a, probably tiny, ...


1

The disadvantage is that it's being initialized twice, in two different ways. This is not a performance problem, as an optimizing compiler will eliminate the first assignment, but it is a problem for code readability. Pick one style and stick with it. Note that in C++11 this sort of "double initialization" comes back into fashion, with in-class member ...


0

The way you doing currently also fine,just ignore the warning and proceed. (And I cannot post comments that's why I put in an answer)


0

You will have to read about the this keyword for that , Just for starters its like and object of the class your'e using, See in the first constructor this("JJ","0") means that a constructor having two arguments is being invoked so the first line redirects the control into the second constructor that's is why the other line is printed ...



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