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8

All you need is a pair of parentheses: f((class x)(33)); Or for more parameters, also use uniform initialization: f((class x){1, 2, 3});


1

Please read about builder pattern. This is a very nice tool to initialize classes, especially when not all fields must be defined at the construction time. There are serveral implementations, I think however that this one would be the most benefitial for your case.


3

There are two solutions: Don't put 100 properties in the class :) It usually indicates bad design and another class trying to break free. If you do have a considerable number of attributes that are always necessary, try the builder pattern instead. That lets you have some generic half-ready objects saved for later. Alternatively, maybe you have a lot of ...


1

Well, having a class with 100 properties is bad design anyway... You can add a constructor, to at least save you the effort of writing each property name on every instance.


0

First, you are missing ; at the end of class definition. Also, while implementing member functions inside class a class, you can't use score operator ::, it's invalid in C++. You may find This useful.


2

Any idea what am I missing? Valid syntax? Not sure where you read this was valid. Use curlies, or =: struct Foo { std::vector<char> buf_ = std::vector<char>(10); std::vector<std::vector<char>> buf2_{10, std::vector<char>(20)}; }; The relevant grammar production is a brace-or-equal-initializer, which holds a clue in ...


4

In-place initialization of non-static data members is not allowed using that syntax. You need the form T t{args}; // 1 or T = t{args}; // 2 or T = t(args); // 3 The reason is to avoid anything that could look like a function declaration. Also note that for std::vector form 1 may lead to some surprising behaviour, because the initialization list ...


0

So I have a completely new solution to this problem that works in MSVC 2013, and doesn't suck (like looking at a pointer to operator()). Tag dispatch it. A tag that can carry any type: template<class T> struct tag{using type=T;}; A function that takes a type expression, and generates a type tag: template<class CallExpr> tag<typename ...


2

You just can't assign to a val after initialization. In Scala the body of the class IS the constructor, you can see examples here. In general, you just define all variables in the primary constructor itself as "class parameters": class Person(val name: String) if you need to receive the name for initialization or class Person() { val name = 'Joe' } if it ...


1

The constructors purpouse is to contain the code to inizialize the object. Usually, the initialization is done using constructor parameters. You can have different constructors with different parameters list, as needed by your context. It is a good pratice to do constructor chaining, that is calling a base constructor from others.


0

Adding to the @brso05 answer, This is also one of the ways: public MyClass( int a) { } public MyClass( int a, int b) { } public MyClass( int a, String b) { } And So on..It is the arguments which make difference, rest remains the same!


2

Actually, if you want to have 10000 constructor, you can as long a signature are differents. public class People { public People(String name, int age) { ... } public People(String name) { ... } } You can construct your object in a different way. You can see an example by yourself looking at : the java String class wich has ...


3

a) is it because the constructors have to be with the same name as the class and we need to distinguish between them ? Yes constructors are always the name of the class without any return type, and in order to distinguish between them, you can have different parameters. b) what if i want to add a third constructor ? it can be also int type ? ...


1

Yes a constructor has the same name as the Class. As long as the constructors have different signatures you can have as many as you want. The signature is what distinguishes one constructor from another... public MyClass() { } public MyClass(int a) { } public MyClass(int a, int b) { } public MyClass(String a) { } public MyClass(int a, String b) { } ...


0

You should use a constructor in the cpp file (and classes instead of structs). The actual content of the array is an implementation detail that shouldn't be in the header. The best way is to use a loop (100 items is a tiny number for a computer, you won't see the difference) in an method that initializes the class. It also allows you to handle errors better ...


0

Here is a demonstrative program that shows how the constructor could be defined provided that your compiler supports C++ 2014. Otherwise you have to change type std::remove_extent_t to its equivalent in C++ 2011. #include <iostream> #include <algorithm> #include <iterator> #include <type_traits> #include <string> struct tup{ ...


5

If you are open to using std::vector instead of an array, you an use: struct tup{ tup() : tokens(100, {-1,"a","b","c","d","e","f"}) {} struct token { int pos; std::string nj, ny, pa, ri, ct, fl; }; std::vector<token> tokens; };


0

Thanks for the community help. This factory will do the job when provided a string array argument, {String classname, args.... } /** * ClassFactory method, build an event. * * @param arguments Required arguments to build an Event. * @return Built event. * @throws java.lang.ClassNotFoundException */ public Event ...


0

Surely it will become complicated, thiskeyword doesn't always refer to the main object but to the scope where it is used, take a look at Scope and this in JavaScript for further information. This is your way to go, make a variable that contains your constructor and add these two methods to this variable, after that you can call your functions: var newApp = ...


0

Some syntax errors & style issues - here is a short correction var myFunction = function(){ //code here }; var mySecondFunction = function(){ //code here }; function NewApp(name){ this.name = name; this.currentPage = 1; this.customObjectWithMethods = function(){}; //empty function so calling doesnt resolve in error } NewApp.prototype.logic = ...


1

You can also define your m_thread object in the constructor initializatin list like that : Foo::Foo() : m_thread(&Foo::loop, this), End(false) { m_thread.join(); } A simple way to end your thread is to use a member variable End, set it to true in the constructor and loop on it in your thread Foo::~Foo() { End = true; m_thread.join(); // ...


3

1) You're attempting to call a thread object, not initialize it here: m_thread(&Foo::loop, Foo()); You should set assign it the appropriate value: m_thread = std::thread(&Foo::loop, Foo()); But this will default-construct another Foo object, which will launch a thread, which will default-construct a Foo object, which will launch a thread, which ...


0

IRrecv receptorIR(_pinInput); IRrecv class don't provide one parameter constructor function´╝îyou should provide it.


1

Dispose method is just another method. You can call it at anytime, from anywhere. In fact, you should call it for any disposable instances that available before you let them to go out of scope. It depends on what you want to Dispose at this stage of the constructor. If you have any Disposable objects initialized you can Dispose them. Check if they are not ...


3

One problem that I see is that you have defined board as an array of pointers, not objects, Piece *board[SIZE][SIZE]; and then you proceed to use board in Game::Game() as though board points to valid objects. Board::Board(){ bool b = false; for (int i=0; i<SIZE; i++){ for(int j=0; j<SIZE;j++){ // Problem. // ...


0

board is a 2-d array of the pointer of Piece, you should new it before use it in Board's ctor: Board::Board(){ bool b = false; for (int i=0; i<SIZE; i++){ for(int j=0; j<SIZE;j++){ board[i][j] = new Piece; // add it here board[i][j]->set_status(b); } } } BTW, don't forget to delete the ...


2

Since you did not provide a whole code example, I'll instead explain what's wrong since I can still tell. Your constructor's definition is written like this: VS1838B::VS1838B(int pinIR) { // stuff } Regardless of what // stuff is, the compiler will actually insert code... VS1838B::VS1838B(int pinIR) // <--- here { // stuff } Which calls the ...


4

When you call rhs.GetItem(i, j) in the assignment operator, the compiler requires that rsh be non-constant. This is because GetItem is not declared a constant member function. However, rhs is declared a constant reference, hence the error. Declare it const to fix the problem: double GetItem(int r, int c) const; // line 383; also on line 466 // ...


0

I believe the code you show is not bad OOP practice. Users of Derived know about, and have access to, Base by virtue of the fact that Derived uses public inheritance. Because of this, you are not adding any dependencies and so are not making anything more restrictive or complex. That said, even if Derived was using protected or private inheritance, it might ...


0

I have been down the same road with MVC frameworks before and I have never heard of an index() function being called like this. Upon instanciation it will call the __constructor if present or do nothing. When calling your controller you should be geting the class and method name and checking if they exist and if they do then instantiate it. However if you ...


1

A "constructor" in Javascript is just a function which has a special property called "prototype". Most (but not all) built-in and all user-defined functions are also constructors. When you define a function, like function Car() {} you actually create two objects: a function and its prototype, which is an empty object by default: The only difference ...


3

A constructor is just a normal function. There is nothing special about it inherently. All functions have a property called prototype. If you write var myInstance = new MyFuction(); JavaScript does something special with your function when it executes it. It sets the vale of this inside the function body to be myInstance. Additionally, it creates a ...


0

constructors are used as prototypes for other objects. No, they are not - if you mean "inheritance target" by the term "prototype". For example, I could create a car constructor and give it objects such as hondaCivic, toyotaCamry, etc. Not sure what you mean. Please show code if you have questions about it. What is the purpose of a ...


0

This may help you this is how I would structure this class hierarchy. class Base { protected: int m_a, m_b; public: Base( int first, int second ); virtual ~Base(){} }; Base::Base( int first, int second ) : m_a( first ), m_b( second ) {} class Second : protected Base { protected: int m_c; public: Second( int first, int second, int ...


0

The code did not work because I had an additional comma in the console.log statement. Thanks for all of your help, everyone!


0

When working with Java projects you'll stubble upon "getter" methods or "get" methods. This is how I solved my problems, by following these instructions. If you're confused on why you should use "getter" methods follow this link. Note that this is for beginners and the language/format I use may (and in some cases is) not be proper. Note that you will also ...


1

You have been attempting to print out l and x which were the arguments passed to you in the constructor. When you try to use them in toString they do not exist in scope -- that is, Java can't see them. You should use the instance variables (letter and count) that you assigned to in the constructor. These are available to all the methods of your class all ...


1

return "Letter" + letter + " occurs " + count + " times"; Missing a + and the variable names are wrong. public int compareTo(LetterCount other) { if ( count < other.count ) return -1; else if (count == other.count) return 0; else return 1; }


1

In toString you are returning 'l' and 'x' which are local variables to the constructor. you should use Letter and Count And also you included + in the string " times". For compareTo you need to add a getter for count public int getCount() { return count; } @Override public int compareTo(LetterCount o) { if(count > o.getCount()){ ...


0

return "Letter" + l + " occurs "+ x + " times"; You are missing a + As for the compareTo, this is typically used to order LetterCount objects. So in your case compare the count values.


1

From a Java language perspective, this is implementation-specific; the JLS doesn't say much about whether methods even require a stack, or what it has to look like, except to say (in 15.12.4.5) that if a method invocation can't happen because the frame can't be created, it should throw a StackOverflowException. From a Java platform perspective (ie, the ...


2

When it really comes down to it a constructor is just like any other method. It takes parameters of whatever types and returns an object of its own type. It's put on the call stack like anything else, and shows as Demo.<init>() An exception in your example call stack-trace would look like Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException ...


1

Yes. Calls to constructors use the stack just like regular methods.


0

template<class...>struct types{using type=types;}; template<class T>struct tag{using type=T;}; template<class Tag>using type_t=typename Tag::type; the above helpers let you work with types as values. class A { template<class T> A( tag<T> ); }; the tag<T> type is a variable with no state besides the type it caries. ...


1

Below's an example of how to implement the Factory Pattern in order to create an instance of the class in question. The benefit here is that the SpecialMethod is called by your "API" and not the consumer of your "API." Ensuring SpecialMethod is always called; change behavior to suit your scenario ... /* consumer (on your page load) */ var instance = ...


1

Is it true that if such an assignment makes sense, then an implicit constructor C(int); should also make sense? In depends. The difference between the assignment and implicit constructor is that in assignment there is already a set-up object, while in implicit conversion you have to create an object given int only. In a most common scenario, the ...


4

If C defines a non-explicit constructor taking an int then you don't necessarily need an assignment operator taking an int, but it may end up being more efficient. If operator=(int) exists: C c; //default constructor c = 5; //assignment from int If C(int) exists and operator=(int) does not: C c; //default constructor c = 5; //construction of temporary ...


0

You don't need the assignment operator too, just the constructor from an int C c(5); Calls the constructor taking an int as an argument. C c = 5; Calls the constructor taking an int as an argument. C c; c = 5; Calls the default constructor, the second statement will call the constructor to an int, then the assignment operator. (2) can cause confusion. ...


0

Just for the sake of completeness (and for the fun of it...), since nobody seems to have mentioned the solution with the shortest (and least sophisticated) code. For frequently used short-lived objects, especially when writing test cases, where you typically do lots of object creation, you may want to optimize for typing convenience (rather than purity), ...


0

There's a very basic reason: Constructors are effectively static functions, and in C++ no static function can be virtual. If you have much experience with C++, you know all about the difference between static & member functions. Static functions are associated with the CLASS, not the objects (instances), so they don't see a "this" pointer. Only member ...



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