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4

You can simplify this a bit by parameterizing the main constructor, then passing in defaults for the other overloads: public Restaurant(string restaurantName, int capacity) { this.Name = restaurantName; this.Chain = null; this.SeatingCapacity = capacity; this.Smoking = false; this.LastMonthSales = MinSales; this.LastMonthCosts = ...


1

Add this to the List, and throw an exception if the user attempts to create the 21st: public class Book { private static final List<Book> books = Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<Book>()); private String title; private int pages; public Book(String title, int pages) { if (books.size() == 20) throw ...


0

I recommend to use list because it's good in some parameter then array. public Book (String titl, int page) { title = titl; pages = page; Arraylist.add(this); // add new Book in the list } For not giving more then 20 public Book (String titl, int page) { title = titl; pages = page; if (Arraylist.size() < 20) { ...


2

To access the current object, you could use the this reference. So your constructor could look like this: public Book(String title, int pages) { this.title = title; // avoid abbreviations like "titl" this.pages = pages; // or "page" just to avoid same variable names ArrayBooks.add(this); // add new Book instance into the list } To avoid more ...


-1

this is one way you can do class Range{ int low, high; Range() { } public void setLow(int plow){ low = plow; } public void setHigh(int phigh){ high = phigh; } public int getLow(){ return low; } public int getHigh(){ ...


-1

getHigh() and getLow() methods are instance methods. Therefore you can't call them like Range.getHigh() And even if you make them static and call like that, since getHigh is a method you can't assign anything to that like x.getHigh() = somevalye; That is causing a compilation error. What you can do is valueX = Range.getHigh(); // assuming methods are ...


2

Your code has two problems: first, getLow() and getHigh() are instance methods, not class methods. However, you call them by Range.getLow() and Range.getHigh(), meaning that you call them on the class Range. This is not allowed. First you have to create an instance of the class: ran = new Range(...) and then you call the methods on this instance: ...


0

use setter to set variable public class Range{ static int low, high; public Range(int plow, int phigh){ low = plow; high = phigh; } public static int getLow(){ return low; } public static int getHigh(){ return high; } public static void setLow(int low) { Range.low = low; } public static void setHigh(int high) { Range.high = ...


0

You have to make an Object of Range before you can call its methods public Tree(String pname, int plow, int phigh){ name = pname; Range ran = new Range(phigh, plow); }


5

This can only realistically work in very simple cases, as you show here. There are other cases where the compiler cannot even tell if the member variable was initialized before use. For example: // a.h void init_a(a & an_a); // a.cpp #include "a.h" void init_a(a & an_a) { an_a.x = 1; } // b.cpp #include "a.h" int test() { a oa; ...


3

I think you are a little confused about the member variable inner and the inner used in the constructor body In your constructor body, Outer(int input) { Inner inner(input); } The variable inner is not the class member. It is a local variable in the scope of the function. To initialize the class member, you will need to use: Outer(int input) : ...


0

T t(x) is called direct-initialization and T t = x is called copy-initialization. Copy-initialization doesn't use assignment even = is used. Because it's used at the point of declaration it is a form of initialization. During copy-initialization, if the type of the initializer doesn't match the type of the object being created, then a converting-constructor ...


0

when editing the UI from a multithreaded application you will likely need to use Invoke. you can only edit the UI from the thread it was started on take this example: public partial class Form1 : Form { static Random rand = new Random(); public Form1() { InitializeComponent(); ...


0

AOP proposes call interception, not dependency injection. Using Spring.Net you can use seters or constructors to perform any dependency injection. For your post and comments, it supposed to work. On Spring.Net initialization pipeline, first step analyse dependency graph, perform any object creation and set all dependencies. After that, if your class ...


2

You have to set this->time = time; in your Date constructor. That is what you are missing.


2

I'm looking at your Date constructor, and some things strike me: It begins by Date::Date( int mn, int dy, int yr, Time time) {, without using :, meaning that your Data::time field will be initialized using Time's default constructor You don't use the time parameter of your constructor, and in particular you don't assign it to Data::time I guess that ...


0

Since C++11, you may use std::nullptr_t for what you want. Demo.


0

It is usual to put mandatory things into the constructor and optional ones into the Initialise function. For example, consider an amplifier that requires a power source so that would be supplied to its constructor. Logically, you may want to turn it on and set its power level but one could argue that you might not want to do that until later. In ...


0

Because constructors are exactly for that: to avoid using an "initialize function" Plus you can have have as many constructors as you want: you juste feed them some parameters, depending how you want to inialize your object.


2

The constructor IS the "Initialize function" Rather than calling two functions object = new Class; object.initialize(); You just call object = new Class(); The logic inside the constructor can be identical to the logic inside the initialize function, but it's much tidier and avoids you naming your function initialize(), me naming mine ...


1

Static Constructor is called automatically before first instance of the class is created. Declared by prefixing a static keyword to the constructor definition. It can not not take access modifiers or have any parameters.


3

room r1 is ambiguous because a constructor with all parameters defaulted is already available as room() as a default constructor ยง 12.1 A default constructor for a class X is a constructor of class X that can be called without an argument. If there is no user-declared constructor for class X, a constructor having no parameters is implicitly ...


0

You have 3 constructors which could be called without supplying any arguments. So the compiler gets confused by these 3 constructors.


3

Consider your BinaryNode assignment operator. BST::BinaryNode& BST::BinaryNode::operator=(const BST::BinaryNode node) { item = node.item; if(node.left != nullptr) left = node.left; else left = nullptr; if(node.right != nullptr) right = node.right; else right = nullptr; return *this; } You still ...


2

The copy constructor should be written as the following for definition: BST::BinaryNode::BinaryNode(const BST::BinaryNode &otherNode) //^^^^^^^^^^^^^ { //... } The BST::BinaryNode at the left is class name; the BinaryNode at the right is function name.


0

You can define a public method on the outer class that enables to instantiate the inner class : public void instantiateInnerClass() { myAttribute = this.new InnerClass(); } However, you won't be able to access and manipulate directly instances of the inner class.


2

Inner classes are members of their outer class so they have full access to all the other members, and all the other members have full access to them. The access markers in an inner class apply only to unrelated classes. And since your inner class is private in itself, it is only accessible for construction from its outer class.


0

I think you need to look into the Singleton Pattern. You cannot declare an instance of a class whose constructor is marked as private but you can always declare a static method in that class with a private property. So when you call that static method of the inner class, it returns the one and only instance of that class to the caller. ...


1

You've got a good start using gfoldl. We need to make two changes. First, as we traverse the structure, we need to keep track of each encountered type to see if they occur recursively. Secondly, we need to use gfoldl recursively to look inside the types we discover in the constructor. Let's get some utility out of the way. bool will get the Bool result when ...


1

Conversion functions and converting-constructors designate conversions from the type for which the conversion function/constructor is made to the type that is taken in the parameter. In other words, you are converting from an X to a Y and not the other way around as you said. When there is a conversion from X to Y, the compiler considers the best conversion ...


0

The most usual way to prevent implicit type conversion is not to declare conversion operator at all and make the constructor explicit. However, if you want to keep the conversion operator, you can make explicit too using explicit keyword: class X { public: explicit operator Y() const; };


0

It does appear to be a regression in SWIG. Here's a reduced example: price@price-laptop:~/test $ cat test.h #ifndef TEST_H #define TEST_H #include <iostream> #include <typeinfo> namespace test { class Foo { public: template<typename T> Foo(T bar); ~Foo() {} void working() const { std::cout << "WORKING" ...


3

Try Date( int = 1, int = 1, int = 1900, Time = Time(0, 0, 0)); The syntax (0,0,0) is just a comma separated list of ints surrounded by brackets, not a Time object. Because the default constructor is the same as the argument list you provided you could also do this Date( int = 1, int = 1, int = 1900, Time = Time());


0

The compiler might need some help figuring out that Image is a templated type. Try putting typename: FootprintSet(typename image::Image<ImagePixelT> const& img, ...


0

You claim you'd do this with overloading in (I assume) C++. But all of your parameters except name appear to be the same type. So clearly you're just overloading on the number of parameters, not the types. Something like this: ClassName(string name, double x, double y, double z, double mass, double inertia) : name_(name), x_(x), y_(y), z_(z), ...


1

A major reason for this is that when you instantiate a class it calls the child constructor ONLY. If you want the parent constructor called as well, you have to explicitly call it by using parent::__construct(). It is assumed that child classes will build their own constructors and implement the parent as they see fit. By contrast, if (using your example) I ...


2

I can not explain why but there is an information in PHP documentation about this: Unlike with other methods, PHP will not generate an E_STRICT level error message when __construct() is overridden with different parameters than the parent __construct() method has. Source: http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.decon.php


2

Just add another constructor in tanks: tanks(double dmg, double v, double d):vechicles(d,v), dmanage(dmg) {} //^^call base class constructor to init base part Then you should be able to create an object of tanks as follows: tanks t34(durability, velocity, damage);


1

In Python 3 you can specify mass and inertia as keyword-only arguments. In Python 2 you would have to use **kwargs and manually extract mass and inertia from the kwargs. Note that, with this setup, mass and inertia must be passed by keyword. Conceptually, it is not possible to pass mass and inertia positionally unless values are also passed for all of ...


0

Maybe create a classmethod that's an alternate constructor? class SomeThing(object): def __init__(self, name, x, y, z, cg_x, cg_y, cg_z, mass, inertia): self.ref_x = x self.ref_y = y self.ref_z = z self.cg_x = cg_x self.cg_y = cg_y self.cg_z = cg_z self.name = name self.mass = mass ...


1

Unless there is a reason to do otherwise, you should always expose a default constructor. You should also expose constructors that are object oriented, ie a car class should be constructable with an engine and transmission but not with a driver, as the driver is not really part of the car class. You should not expose a default constructor if you want the ...


0

If it does make a sense to have an object of your class without any initial values, then you may use the default constructor. But if you find that in your program you frequently have code that looks like this: ClassName c = new ClassName(); c.p1 = someValue1; then this is a strong hint that you do require a constructor with parameters. The reason is that ...


0

Are those properties required for the class to function normally? Then injecting them via the constructor as in Way 2 may be best. Additionally, if you weren't aware, you're actually asking about 2 different forms of dependency injection. Way 1 is property injection, and Way 2 is constructor injection. This may aid you in seeking further resources on which ...


2

I agree with Habib and adding a little more info, I find it easier for example when adding to a list: List<ClassName> myList = new List<ClassName>(); myList.Add(new ClassName(someValue1,someValue2,someValue3,someValue4)); myList.Add(new ClassName(someValue5,someValue6,someValue7,someValue8)); Instead of having to create the objects ...


2

Using either depends on the requirement. If you want your class object to have some state (properties assigned) at the time of instantiation then use parametrized constructor. If your class doesn't have a default constructor (no parameters) then there will be no way for the user to instantiate a class without any state. By default each class would have a ...


0

Because User is a subclass of Person, every User also has a User (which has a User, ad infinitum) - which is probably not what you want. I'm not really sure what you're trying to achieve, but having a User attribute in the Person which is set in the constructor is not going to work.


0

Yes, This is a result of bad coding. You have to think again. In your current code resulting infinite recursion.


0

What did you expect? You created an infinite recursion in your constructor calls. You can overcome this problem by not creating the instance of User in the Person constructor. Instead, call a setter method that would assign its value.


3

You have infinite Recursion. new User() implicitly calls Person() (super-class constructor), in which you have again called new User() which again calls Person() and so on. PS : from a design perspective, if a User is a (inheritance) person, then I don't think it is wise to use a person has-a (composition) user.


0

So, um, there's a lot of confusion in this question. But, if what you've written does what it's supposed to, and you just want a better way to express it, I'd recommend something like this. static Class[] COLUMN_CLASSES = {Integer.class, String.class, ArrayList.class}; public Class<?> getColumnClass(int columnIndex) { return ...



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