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1

is there a difference between using std::move and std::forward? Why should I use one instead of the other? Yes, std::move returns an rvalue reference of its parameter, while std::forward just forwards the parameter preserving its value category. Use forward when you don't know what you've (may an lvalue or an rvalue) and want to foward it to something ...


0

You can read line by line and create a buttons in runtime for each line : public Frame() throws FileNotFoundException, IOException { try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("1.txt"))) { String line; while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) { // read line by line String[] paramAndValue = new ...


1

Assuming you don't need the names from the text file (parameter 1, etc), one possible solution is to try going through the text file and save each value to a boolean array. Then you can do something like this: List<MyButton> buttons = new ArrayList<MyButton>(); for (int i = 0; i < buttonValues.length; i++) { //buttonValues is the array of ...


0

It seems the relationship between your masterClass and subClass is composition. My suggestion is creating subClass and masterClass individually. And treat the instance of subClass as the member of masterClass. The same as what you said "construct and initialize them first, and then pass them to the masterClass". Since this is the correct usage of ...


2

You can't prevent const instances being constructed. If you use this in your constructor it is up to you to be suitably careful - you can explicitly const_cast it to a const *, for example. Generally it works better if the management of the object is not handled within the object's own class. For example, you could restrict things so that the object can ...


1

Both the class and the constructor can be generic on their own, i.e. each has its own type parameters. For example class A<T> { <S>A(S s){} } To invoke the constructor with all explicit type arguments new <String>A<Integer>("abc"); // T=Integer, S=String Think of it like this, A<Integer> is the concrete class, and ...


6

There are two parts to this: The generic type parameter given for the class definition is available within the class itself. You can have generic types specific to individual methods (including constructor). Look at the following example: package snippet; import java.util.ArrayList; public class Y<E> extends ArrayList<E> { public ...


1

You are confusing a method's declaration with its call site (that is, where you use it). If you want to use a generic that's declared on the class, only ever need to provide the <E> or <> at the call site — not the declaration. And in that regard, a constructor is declared like any other method: public GenericStack<E> { public E ...


1

Class C does not explicitly extend class A, it is only via class B that C extends A, hence you will only be able to access the constructors of A, via the constructors of Class B. By using super(1,2) in Class C's constructor you will call Class B's constructor which has two int parameters. You would need to change class B's arg constructor to the following: ...


0

I don't think that you can, directly from C. It would need to be done by calling the appropriate B constructor within C's constructor. e.g., A class public class A { public A() { System.out.println("A construtor"); } public A(int a, int b) { System.out.println("A.a:"+ a + "/B.b:"+b); } } B class public class B ...


1

The Problem When you call Record rec2(rec);, you have two viable constructors: your copy constructor Record(Record const&) and the variadic constructor with Refs = {Record&} which works out to Record(Record&). The latter is a better candidate since it's a less cv-qualified reference, so it wins even if that's not what you want. The Solution ...


0

It is necessary to pass object as reference and not by value because if you pass it by value its copy is constructed using the copy constructor.This means the copy constructor would call itself to make copy.This process will go on until the compiler runs out of memory.


1

It's a bad practice to overload on forwarding references (see Effective modern C++, Item 26). They tend to devour everything you pass to them due to overload resolution rules. In your example, you're constructing a Record object out of a non-const Record object and that's why your copy ctor doesn't get executed. If you call it like this Record ...


2

In your example, the forwarding reference is used with Record&. So you may add an extra overload for Record& (to forward to copy constructor): Record(Record& other) : Record(static_cast<const Record&>(other)) {} or use sfinae on the one with forwarding reference.


1

var addButton = document.querySelector("#add"); var searchButton = document.querySelector("#search"); var titleInput = document.querySelector("#title"); function Book(title) { this.title = title; } function Library() { this.books = []; } Library.prototype.add = function(book) { this.books.push(book); } var library = new ...


0

int main(){ vector<HasPtrValue> a(5, string("stackoverflow")); } Your constructor requires std::string and "stackoverflow" is char array. Alternatively you can define additional constructor accepting char[].


3

Because it needs two user defined conversions, const char* -> std::string, and then std::string -> HasPtrValue, but only once user defined implicit conversion is permitted in an implicit conversion sequence. 13.3.3.1.2$1 User-defined conversion sequences [over.ics.user] A user-defined conversion sequence consists of an initial standard conversion ...


2

This is fun so let me try to summarize it. see JLS#6.6.1 protected can qualify a constructor or a member of a class. "member" includes field/method (static/instance), nested class/interface (static/inner) class A { protected int f protected void m(){} protected class X{} protected interface Y{} First, to access a protected ...


1

In Objective-C++, instance variables must be default constructible, and are default-constructed during allocation. Unfortunately, there's not much official documentation to back this up, and what there is is very old and outdated.


2

See Java Language Specification: A protected member or constructor of an object may be accessed from outside the package in which it is declared only by code that is responsible for the implementation of that object. Your class A2 is not responsible for the implementation of A in the new A() call. Meaning, it is not responsible for the implementation ...


0

Look at this postinstance inner class and here is some modify to work with your case: Class<?> innerClass = Class.forName(MainActivity.class.getName() + "$MyExtendedClass"); Constructor<?> ctor = innerClass.getDeclaredConstructor(MainActivity.class); ctor.setAccessible(true); ...


1

what is difference between a construct having super function and without it. Well, it can be easily tested. They are actually the same for this case. More importantly, you probably want to know when and how to use super. Running the following codes: public class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { new ...


0

Java implicitly calls the constructor of the super class, if you haven't called it explicitly (constructor chaining - search this term on google for more info). Even if your class is not explicitly inherited from any class, java implicitly makes it inherit the Object class (and makes a call to the constructor of the Object class). So, there's no difference ...


0

super() just calls the parent constructor of the function and lets you either pass arguments such as super(someArgument) or can be used to call methods of the parent constructor such as super.someMethod(). super() alone just calls the parent constructor without passing any arguments or referencing any methods of the parent. The actual decision on when to ...


3

If there is no explicit call to a super class constructor, the compiler will generate a call to super(). Because of this there is no difference between your examples.


2

No Difference, Its just a matter of explicit and implicit. In the second case, it implicitly calls the super constructor of this Students class if it is inherited from a parent class. Read more on this. You can find more info if you google it. public class A { //there is a hidden constructor. Even if you explicitly write it //public A(){ //} ...


0

Since subclasses are initialized after parent class you can't rely on fields of a subclass in a superclass constructor. What you can do is provide a custom behavior through an abstract method, so basically private int minFuelTime = new Time(0,20,0); protected Time getMinFuelTime() { return minFuelTime; } becomes: class Planet { protected abstract ...


2

Simply override getMinFuelTime and getMaxFuelTime in your child classes, as such: public class Type1Plane extends Plane{ private Time minFuelTime = new Time(0, 20, 0) // 20 minute private Time maxFuelTime = new Time(0, 40, 0) // 40 minute public Type2Plane (int id, Time currentTime) { super(id, currentTime); } protected Time ...


0

You need to override getMinFuelTime and getMaxFuelTime methods in the child classes.


0

You can do it using #define. Define a macro which would save variable name inside class: #include <iostream> #include <string> using namespace std; #define CREATE_FOO(f) Foo f = Foo(#f); class Foo { public: void Print() const; Foo(string s): name(s) {}; protected: string name; }; void Foo::Print() ...


0

The constructor should always establish the invariants of the class, nothing more or less. I would strongly argue that a class that is in an invalid state after construction and has to be initialized with an init() call is ill-formed. For testing purposes, I would consider moving the construction of the sub-parts out of the class and supply them to the ...


0

Methods like init() helps in delegating initialization process to a later time and thus allows quick startup because the constructors don't have to spend much time doing init(). This is especially true if those init methods are performing costly operations as in using intensive CPU cycles or acquiring costly resources. On the other hand, if you impose such ...


0

It depends from the semantic of the init() functions. What do they do? And what do their constructors do? Why two distinct functions (constructor and init) for initialization? In a lot of code I've seen, usually inits functions are due mainly to their implementer's sloppery. What they do belongs to the constructor, from the C++ perspective. On the other ...


4

$A = new A(); $B = new B(); These two lines above create 2 different object, which don't have anything to do with each other. So since you also have a constructor in class B the parent constructor doesn't get called implicit, means you have to change your code and call the constructor from class A in class B, e.g. public function __construct() { ...


3

The readResolve implementation is there to prevent the creation of invalid instances of the case class by editing serialised copies of the class. Depending on how much you trust the environment in which the code will be used, you may feel you can safely ignore this risk. It comes about because case classes extend Serializable, and so may end up getting ...


1

Move the line that constructs the object after the switch statement. int intake, choice; cin >> choice; switch(choice){ case 1: cin >> intake; // Don't do this. // q(intake); break; case 2: ... default: } // Now that you have intake, construct q. Quota q(intake);


0

You can't call constructors after the value is declared. Try this instead: q = Quota(intake); You'll also need to declare a default constructor for Quota initializing all members to "reasonable defaults"


0

This has nothing to do with the switch: as it is, you wouldn't be able to write Quota q; // default construct q(intake); The first statement Quota q constructs a Quota, and that's where you need to pass the intake parameter. You can use the copy constructor to do Quota q; q = Quota(intake);


4

What is the default access of constructor in C++ and why? The implicitly generated default constructor, copy constructor, move constructor, copy assignment, move assignment and destructors are all implicitly declared public for obvious reasons (otherwise by default all types would not be instanciable, copyable, movable and destructible). If you are to ...


3

There is not default access to constructors. You decide what the access is when you declare it in the class. If you are talking about the default constructor that is created by the compiler then the C++ standard 12.1.4 has: [...]An implicitly-declared default constructor is an inline public member of its class.


1

There's no default access for a constructor or any other member. In a class defined with the keyword class all members are private by default; in a class defined with the keyword struct they are public by default. That includes the constructor.


11

If you do not declare a constructor yourself, the compiler will always generate a public trivial one for you. They will also implicitly create a public copy constuctor and copy assignment operator. From c++ standard 12.1.5: If there is no user-declared constructor for class X, a constructor having no parameters is implicitly declared as defaulted. An ...


1

This is not possible "Directly", consider this simple program; // stove.cpp #include <string.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <iostream> using namespace std; class Foo { char* t; size_t length; public: Foo() { t = new char(8); t = static_cast<char*>(static_cast<void*>(this)); } ...


2

The compiler doesnt automatically know the type of the array so it has to be expressly defined when declaring it as an expression private Item item = new Item("Something", new String[] {"A", "B"}, null);


0

class Grandpa { public function __construct() { echo"Hello Kiddo"; } } class Papa extends Grandpa { public function __construct() { } public function CallGranddad() { parent::__construct(); } } class Kiddo extends Papa { public function __construct() { } public ...


1

giving your partition base class a parameter less default constructor would also get rid of your error message.


2

You can use the base constructor. public PartitionSegment(Vector3 midpoint, float radius) : base(midpoint, radius) { //additional relevant code }


3

Remembering my old days developing C#, don't you have to write ? : public PartitionSegment(Vector3 midpoint, float radius) : base(midpoint, radius) { }


0

std::tuple construction order is currently unspecified. A proposal for a concrete decision on its order has been submitted to the committee, but until then the order should not be relied on.


1

The keyword this I'm new to programming, but having studied class structure I believe what you might be looking for is the keyword this. As in the example below (taken from cplusplus.com), you can see that this is used anywhere the class needs to refer to itself. Therefore, it is possible for a constructor to do this as well. // example on this #include ...



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