New answers tagged

1

If you mean that each customer can have an unlimited number of drinks they can order, and you want a random order of one drink for that customer each time you call the order() method then you just just need to pick a random drink for the customers drinks property? var Customer = function(name, drinks) { this.drinks = drinks; this.name = name; ...


0

According to Visual Studio, I had this being a nullptr when I wrapped the object in a unique_ptr and didn't initialize it properly, then later on called a method on it to see what would happen. While this differs from the opening post, it satisfies the topic title (assuming VS2015 wasn't lying to me). This was due to me doing something wrong outside of the ...


1

This code is async this._reparacionsService.getReparacions().subscribe(rep => this.reparacions = rep.json()); this means that this.getLastWeek(); in ngOnInit() { this.getReparacions(); this.getLastWeek(); is executed before this.reparacions = rep.json() is executed You probably want to do something like getReparacions() { return this....


0

I am a Cppcheck developer. To create a copy constructor: Simulator(const Simulator &sim); If you do not plan to use the copy constructor, it's better to delete it: Simulator(const Simulator &) = delete; Resource leak: You need to use fclose(inputfile) Possible leak: Imagine this code: Simulator simulator; simulator....


0

The best way to achieve this it to make returnString an instance variable and not a class variable. The way your code is structured now, all instance of the class shares the same copy of that variable. So any change you make through an instance, reflects on the other instances. You can change your code this way: public class SomeClass { String ...


1

You need to use the Singleton pattern. public class SomeClass{ private static String returnString = null; protected SomeClass() {} //So that you can block calling default constructor public static String getStaticInstance(String a, String b) { if (returnString == null) { returnString = a + b; } return returnString; } } ...


0

If you want to get the value according to the parameters you pass in the constructor, then just remove the static keyword after that you will have the following behavior.. SomeClass a = new SomeClass("a", "b"); System.out.println(a.returnString); //returns ab SomeClass b = new SomeClass("c", "d"); System.out.println(b.returnString); //returns cd System....


0

Its basically saying that any class that is instantiated has an implicit constructor: public class B { //constructor public B() { //implicity constructor } } public class A { //constructor public A() { Bb = new B(); //calls the constructor inside B during setup even if the constructor method does not ...


1

It may be a compiler bug. I reduced and simplified the code example: struct ctor_takes_int { // dummy parameter needed to put expression in a ctor-init-list of derived class ctor_takes_int (int=0){ } } ; struct stupid_base { //int nevermind; } ; struct upcast_in_init_list; /* * volatile = anti optimisation : * no value propagation ...


0

I know I am a little late to the party, but I've used this trick a couple of times (and I know it's a bit unusual): I create an generic interface InfoRunnable<T> with one method: public T run(Object... args); And if I need to do something before passing it to the constructor I just do this: super(new InfoRunnable<ThingToPass>() { public ...


-1

A constructor has the same name as the Class. It is used to initialize an instance of an Object. A class can have from zero to an infinite amount of constructors (the limitation is that every constructor needs to be unique). When no constructor is present the compiler automatically calls one with no parameters on run time. A method is something totally ...


0

I don't think your code will run without compiling errors.because you did not declare the constructor packageClassTwo().


1

If you want to call all methods of packageClassTwo you have to do it explicitly packageClassTwo pct = new packageClassTwo(""); pct.CreateWord(); pct.CreateSentence(); If you allways want the 2 methods to be called when you create a new packageClassTwo object, than you can just add the calls to the constructor public packageClassTwo(String name) { ...


0

If you want to call all the methods from the packageClassTwo, call them from the packageClassTwo constructor public packageClassTwo(String name) { int length = name.length(); CreateWorld(); CreateSentence(); }


4

Since Java is an object oriented language, you have to have a mindset of dealing with instances that are realizations of the classes you defined. These are the objects. So if you want to call a method from packageClassTwo class, you first create an object of packageClassTwo. You seem to be trying to do just this. Once you have the object, you can call its ...


0

The C++ standard forbids calling a pure virtual method from either a constructor or a destructor. If you were to directly call toString() from ~AbstractBase() you would almost certainly get a compiler error. Your use of a lambda is basically "sneaking" the disallowed behaviour past the compiler. Instead, you need to move the responsibility up to Derived - ...


2

The problem here is order of destructors calls. Here is a simple example: #include <functional> #include <iostream> #include <memory> #include <string> using namespace std; class Object { public: Object(){ cout<<"O\n"; } ~Object() { cout<<"~O\n"; } }; class AbstractBase { public: AbstractBase(){ cout<<"A\n"...


0

To achieve the intended behaviour you could use Decorators, even though that is probably not what they are supposed to be used for. This interface MyInterface { new (); } function MyInterfaceDecorator(constructor: MyInterface) { } @MyInterfaceDecorator class TestClass { constructor () { } } compiles without a problem. In contrast, the ...


1

If you don't know the value to assign to a field, that can mean two things: Mostly, it means you don't have the class at all. Note that in C++, class is not a 'collecting storage' for some data until you have it (we have a separate pattern/anti-pattern called Builder for that), in which case you shouldn't create the class. You might consider having several ...


0

If you don't create your own constructor then compiler automatically generates default constructor. Class in C++ has to have at least one constructor. If any of your data members can't be initialized with default constructor then compiler reports compilation error.


1

In ES6, Reflect.construct() is quite convenient: Reflect.construct(F, args)


1

If myoldClass is an existing class and you want to inject the IMemcache argument while keeping backwards compatibility with classes that aren't DI-constructed, you can do this: public myoldClass(string a, string b, IMemcache memcache = null) { _a = a; _b = b; _memcache = memCache ?? new Memcache(); } A DI container will ...


0

I did it Class ClassToClone Implements ICloneable Public Overridable Function Clone() As Object Implements ICloneable.Clone Return CloneVal({}) End Function Public Function CloneVal(args() as Object) As Object Dim t As Type = MyClass.GetType() Dim constr As Reflection.ConstructorInfo = t.GetConstructor(New Type() {}...


3

For what it's worth, the code looks OK to me. I don't see anything controversial in this use of static_cast - it's run-of-the-mill derived-to-base pointer conversion. Looks like a compiler bug to me. If you insist on chapter and verse: [expr.static.cast]/4 An expression e can be explicitly converted to a type T using a static_cast of the form ...


1

Java creates a default constructor if and only if no other explicit constructor is provided. From the docs: You don't have to provide any constructors for your class, but you must be careful when doing this. The compiler automatically provides a no-argument, default constructor for any class without constructors. See: https://docs.oracle.com/javase/...


8

From C++11, [class.base.init]¶6: If a constructor delegates to itself directly or indirectly, the program is ill-formed; no diagnostic is required. All compilers are right – the code is broken, and the compiler isn't required to tell you so. At this point you have UB; from [intro.compliance]¶2: If a program contains a violation of a rule for which ...


0

Consider a factory-like pattern for generating time objects: static bool Time::CreateTime(int hour, int min, int second, Time *time) { if (hour <= 12 && hour >= 0 && min < 60 && min >= 0 && second < 60 && second >= 0) { Time t(hour, min, second); *time = t; return true; } ...


0

Same rules, except... This is actually no different than the regular rules for accessing members any other member of the base class. The constructor is little more than a regular function. The key difference is that the derived class automatically tries to call the base constructor. Specifically the base constructor that doesn't take parameters. If no ...


0

You are right. It does nothing. Empty constructor calls super() by default. Without this() second constructor will also call super() by default. My guess is once there was some initialisation in LinkedList() and by calling this(), this initialisation is also used in LinkedList(Collection<? extends E> c). And now it is a useless and harmless leftover.


2

No. That doesn't make sense because after you enter the {...} the default constructor already worked and the parent object built.


0

This means that a B1 object can be instantiated using only a A1 Sort of. They must pass a A1 pointer to the constructor, but they don't need an instance of A1, because they could simply pass a nullptr. while B2 necessarily need a B1 object right? No. B2 needs an A2 and B1 doesn't inherit A2. here's no chance I could mix things, using A2 for ...


1

What about if A,B are not abstract? does it change something? No. The main impact of this is that the user can construct an A directly. If B's constructor is public, they will also be able to instantiate a B from that A object. However, they won't be able to instantiate either B1 or B2 from that A. Since their constructors take an A1 and A2 respectively, ...


2

Please can anyone tell how constructors are called in case of virtual class concepts. According to the initialization order, the virtual base class will be initialized at first. 1) If the constructor is for the most-derived class, virtual base classes are initialized in the order in which they appear in depth-first left-to-right traversal of the ...


0

The virtual bases are always initialized first in DFS post-order. This guarantees that the virtual A and B bases will be initialized first, and A before B since B is derived from A. After that, the three non-virtual bases A, B, C are simply initialized in declaration order as you would expect.


1

My answer is it depends on the compiler. Most compilers should be smart enough to optimize both of those, and make them equivalent. If the compiler wasn't a factor then just by looking, and thinking about it I would assume the initializer list. It initializes the member variable with it, instead of having to initialize it and then set it. It might be just a ...


3

There is no law against mixing both methods. In the case of PODs, there is not going to be any measurable difference between either method, and the C++ compiler is likely to generate identical code for both methods of initialization. On the other hand, if the class members are more complex classes, rather than PODs like ints, constructor initialization ...


5

This appears to be a GCC bug, triggered when uniform initialisation is used with virtual inheritance. If we change: Copier(int nScanner, int nPrinter, int nPower) :Scanner {nScanner, nPower}, Printer {nPrinter, nPower}, PoweredDevice {nPower} { } to: Copier(int nScanner, int nPrinter, int nPower) :Scanner (nScanner, nPower), Printer (nPrinter, ...


2

Since I am already invoking a new Fido object (which is an extension of Dog, and if I recall correctly inherits its methods and variables), is instantiation of a new Dog object in the Fido() constructor redundant? It is not redundant per se, but it is rather pointless and wasteful. You are instantiating a new, different Dog, and then ignoring it. The ...


1

If a constructor does not explicitly invoke a superclass constructor, then the Java compiler automatically inserts a call to the no-argument constructor of the superclass. If the super class does not have a no-argument constructor, you will get a compile-time error. Object does have such a constructor, so if Object is the only superclass, there is no problem....


1

Your use of super() is correct. Your use of a Dog object is completely unnecessary. By extending Dog, Fido inherits the non-private fields and method of Dog. Therefore, you can simplify Fido: package pet; public class Fido extends Dog { //Since this is a default constructor (no args and super() only), //you don't even have to declare this. ...


1

your code should show a compiler error in the superclass. Let's run through the logic you have: In the super class you have this.foodDogEats; // should be a compiler error What do you think it does? It does nothing because it is just a statement. The 'this' keyword only means you are referring to the variable in the specific instance of the object that ...


7

You're right that the Dog dog = new Dog(); line is redundant. It would create a second, entirely separate Dog object. The super() call is also unnecessary. All Java constructors implicitly call super() unless you override that behaviour by calling a different super-constructor.


11

The class Y does have access to a parameterless constructor for the base class, X, since if a class defines no constructor there is an implicit parameterless constructor. If you write: public class X { public X(int i){} } Then there will no longer be an accessible parameterless constructor of X in Y.


6

The problem stems for a misunderstanding of your example code. Because you've not defined any constructor in class X C# has defined an implicit one for you. This implicit constructor is a no-arg constructor. The quote you're mentioning refers to the case where you've actually written a non-default constructor. Writing the non-default constructor suppresses ...


0

This may help you: //Load the class Class class = Class.forName("Transactions"); Field field = class.getField("box") if(field!=null){ //field exist now check if its initialized or not, or if its primitive field check against its assumed initialized value if(ClassName.fieldName!=null){ //yes initilized } }


1

You can easily check which one has just been called by checking if this.label == null. You can also add a flag which would point which constructor has been called. Anyway. If you are facing such a problem, you should definitely think out your code again. Those constructors probably shouldn't construct objects of the same class. Maybe some inheritance, ...


5

If you need to distinguish that, both objects probably should not be of the same class. In your example, both classes could share a common superclass, or they should have a field of a special type, holding the common information.


0

Wow. Please look up the concepts of object oriented programming https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/concepts/ You want to define new parameters as type + parametername like Pirate wrote in his answer. Different parameters are separated by commas. Try package shop; public class MyShop{ private String buyDate; private int quantity; ...


-1

Try this, class A{ A(String a,String b){ System.out.print(a); System.out.print(b); } public static void main(String arg[]){ A obj=new A("Stack","OverFlow"); } } Hope it will help.


3

ABC(2, 3); doesn't call the constructor to initialize the members, it just create a temporary variable which will be destroyed immediately. If you meant delegating constructor you should: ABC() : ABC(2, 3) { cout << "Default constructor called!" << endl; cout << x << " " << y << endl; } Note this is a C++11 ...



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