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1

The regular rules for constructors apply. You can have as many constructors as you want so long as they have different signatures. Different enum values can then be built using different constructors: enum StringAndNumber { Zero("zero"), Five(5), Pi("Pi", 3.14159); private final String str; private final Number num; private ...


2

As for first question: you cannot have separate constructors, but you can work-around this in the following manner: public enum EnumTest { ONE() { void init() { val = 2; } }, TWO() { void init() { val = 1; } }; protected int val; abstract void init(); EnumTest() { ...


4

No, and I don't think that is what Bloch means, although it has not been formulated in the best possible way. An enum can have constructors, as the enum Operation in the book has. What Bloch means with "its own constructor" is: when the constructor of Operation runs for that particular constant. This is already answered by what you quoted above: This ...


0

If we need to create always the same kind of object, I rather use the Constructor pattern, since it allows me to share methods and properties through automatic delegation by the prototype chain. Also we can keep the private objects; look at this approach: var ConstructorName = (function() { //IIFE closure 'use strict'; function privateMethod ...


0

c# does not have copy constructor. System.Object class has MemberwiseClone method which creates shallow copy for reference types. In shallow copy the value types fields are copied as it is. For reference type fields, the address is copied in the newly created object. Deep copy of an object is created when actual objects are allocated for reference field ...


3

As Zeta suggested in the comments, coerce is a nice, general way to do this: process (Pick xs) = coerce . mconcat . map (First . process) $ xs Another nice thing about coerce is that you can use it to coerce "inside" of a type constructor at no runtime cost, like this: example :: [Sum Int] -> [Int] example = coerce The alternative, map getFirst, ...


5

In this case you can actually use the newtypes package to solve this problem more generically: process :: Node -> Maybe String process (Pick xs) = ala' First foldMap process xs process (Join xs) = liftM os_path_join (mapM process xs) process (Name x) = Just x process (Given x) = x You could even have a more generic version that takes a Newtype n (Maybe ...


0

Polymorphism at work. When you override a super class method in derived class, then always your overridden method in derived class is called when someone operates on any object of derived class, even if that someone is a super class. so Derived setVar() is called twice because it is overridden in 'Derived' and you tried to create an object of 'Derived' ...


3

The thing that I don't understand is that ss4 is simply a vector, and yet I am able to store the derived class t inside of it. You're not. Your passing a t object, which is used to initialize the s object that gets stored in the vector. See object slicing. You're essentially doing this: s a = t{"mademouselle"};


0

Java will decide which method to run based on the runtime type of the variable, i.e. use polymorphism, at all times, even if the method called is from a base class constructor. When the base class constructor is called, polymorphism means that the derived class's version of setVar is called, and 20 is added. Then the derived class constructor is called, ...


3

Meta programming looks overly complex for this. I'd simply use unFirst (First x) = x -- define once, use many times process (Pick xs) = unFirst . mconcat . map (First . process) $ xs It is often the case that a function is defined together with the newtype, e.g. newtype First a = First { unFirst :: a }


4

If you're using Data.Monoid.First, then this is just getFirst. Many newtype wrappers use record syntax to provide an easy function to unwrap the newtype.


3

Your init needs to take its parameter by reference: void Foo::init(Bar*& x) { x = new Bar(); } That way, the new Bar that you are allocating actually gets to a and b. Otherwise, you're just allocating a temporary (and leaking it) twice. Alternatively, you could have init() be named create() (or equivalent) and just return a new Bar: Bar* ...


2

It happens becouse in JavaScript object does not copy that way, thats why all of your players using the same perks object. There is a few ways to solve it: Create new object with a function (object own constructor). function createPerks() { return { health: 100, attack: 10 }; } var player = function(hp) { this.stats = ...


1

The moment you write this.stats = perks; both of them refer to the same object that is {health: 100, attack: 10}. So any changes made to any one of them will always affect the other. As var Steven = new player(300); is the last value you assigned. All your players will now have {health: 300, attack: 10}


2

Just to be completely clear: Haskell 98 and Haskell 2000 both allow infix value constructors such as data Complex r = r :+ r Here the value constructor (:+) is infix, as in 5 :+ 7. You only need the TypeOperators extension to have type constructors which are infix. For example, data x ??! y = Left x | Right y Here the type constructor (??!) is infix, ...


1

Yes it is executable. __construct always wins in PHP 5. class A { function __construct() { echo 1; } function A() { echo 2; } } new A(); // prints 1 with PHP 5, prints 2 with PHP 4


2

You're getting the undefineds because, when you execute the code, the browser will log the return value of the functions. Since you aren't specifying a return, the functions return undefined, and that's what the console logs. If you want to return that string in your show function, you'll have to... well, return the string: // ... function feed(){ var ...


0

Have the abstract class have an abstract method which takes what you would have for parameters. For instance: public abstract void setSize(int rows,int columns);


0

If a VM process appears to be looping, the first step is to try to get a thread dump. If a thread dump can be obtained, it will often be clear which thread is looping. If the looping thread can be identified, then the trace stack in the thread dump can provide direction on where (and maybe why) the thread is looping. If the application console (standard ...


1

Ok, I figured out that it was a recursive function. I had added this code as a field in my game class: public class Game extends JPanel { ////THIS WAS THE PROBLEM public static Movement a = new Movement(5, 5); //// Game () {} } And this code in the Movement class: public class Movement { int x, y; ////THIS TOO Movement b = ...


2

Box(input); ...is equivalent to... Box input; That is, it's trying to create a variable of type Box with identifier input, but there's already a std::string called input, hence the redefinition error. What you obviously want - a temporary Box constructed from the input string - should be written - in C++11 - like this... Box{input}; FWIW, a good ...


0

It is not clear what your actual problem is because you haven't posted the error message. However, you singleton implementation is not really idiomatic or correct, mainly because the constructor of your class is protected. This means that anyone subclassing your class can create additional instances of it -- making the class no longer a singleton. The ...


1

JavaScript has prototype-based inheritance. When you do something like pet1.something, it looks at the pet1 instance to see if it has a property called something. If it doesn't, it looks at the objet's prototype to see if it has a propety called something. If it doesn't, it checks the prototype's prototype, and so on. The smart way to give objects methods ...


1

For starters you're probably going to want to keep track of both the minimum (probably 0), maximum, and current values of each of your properties. From there you'll just be manipulating the current value, e.g. function Pet(name){ this.name = name; this.maxHealth = Math.floor((Math.random() * 10) + 1); this.currentHealth = this.maxHealth; ...


1

For example, the feed method could be: function feed(amountOfFood){ this.hunger += amountOfFood; //Same as this.hunger = this.hunger + amountOfFood; } You will then presumably have a way in which this method is called by the user but I'm not sure how you plan on the user interacting with the game so can't explain much more...


7

It's not part of the Haskell standard, but as jamshidh mentions it is still possible in GHC. The caveat is that data constructors (not type constructors) must start with a colon: {-# LANGUAGE TypeOperators #-} data a + b = a :+ b f :: a + b -> a f (a :+ b) = a g :: a + b -> b g (a :+ b) = b


0

After looking at your source code here is what I have seen! In your class for your private members your row and column sizes should not be of type int, they should be unsigned int. The reason they should be unsigned int is because an int without an unsigned is a signed value by default which means it can have negative numbers. For the amount of rows and ...


1

That code is no good example. This might be better: class binario{ public: // If you are are using C++11 (or higher): // int n = 0; int n; binario(); binario(int); void estado(); long int convierte(); long int complementouno(); }; binario::binario() // If you are are not using C++11 (or higher). Otherwise omit this ...


1

It sets the value of n inside the class to the value of n given as a parameter upon construction. Since both share the same name, some distinction is required. It is preferred to write: binario::binario(int n) { this->n = n; } or use different names: binario::binario(int a_number) { n = a_number; } Note: this is a pointer to the object ...


2

:: is for accessing static variables and methods of a class/struct or namespace. It can also be used to access variables and functions from another scope (actually class, struct, namespace are scopes in that case) So, you are using this to access the n variable.


2

To make an array of 5 elements that each get constructed with (15,15), you could do the following in C++11: matrix* D = new matrix[5]{ {15,15}, {15,15}, {15,15}, {15,15}, {15,15} }; But it would be much simpler to just use a vector: std::vector<matrix> D(5, {15,15}); // C++11 std::vector<matrix> D(5, matrix(15,15)); // pre-C++11


2

I would choose the consctructor approach, but more like this var Gandalf = new Character("Gandalf", "wizzard", 50, 15, 8); function Character(name, characterClass, health, damage, heal){ this.name = name, this.characterClass = characterClass, this.health = health, this.damage = damage, this.heal = heal, this.dodge = Math.random() * ...


0

You may need to use Commander library. also see this post : First Node.js Command-line Application


6

Value-initialization for an array will value-initialize each element in the array. You have an array of arrays, so each element (an array) will be value-initialized. From there, return to the first sentence of this answer for what happens to each array. The answer to your second question, regular enumerations are scalars, and as such are value-initialized, ...


2

Value initialization (i.e. with {}) for multidimensional arrays value-initializes all elements, so all 10000 elements will have value 0.


0

Wrap your this in double brackets. Netbeans ignores some errors by default if they are in sub-statements. public MyClass() { ... instances.add((this)); } http://stackoverflow.com/a/8357990


0

You've declared the class Vehicle as a non-static inner class. That means it must be associated with an instance of the AssignmentEX2 class. AssignmentEX2 assignmentEX2=new AssignmentEX2(); Vehicle vehicle = assignmentEX2.new Vehicle("5554EAWV3898"); You have to write as below Vehicle.Car car = vehicle.new Car("6903NMME5853", 4); Vehicle.Truck truck= ...


3

Create a parameterless constructor like public Form1() { InitializeComponent(); }


1

You seem to have put the subclasses as inner classes. I advise you to add a closing bracket '}' after the toString method in the Vehicle definition. If not the classes will be Vehicle.Car instead of Car, Vehicle.Truck instead of Truck, etc...


3

The general answer is no. The use of a braced-init-list as the initializer will first try to resolve to the constructor that takes an std::initializer_list. As an illustration: #include <iostream> #include <vector> int main() { auto p = new std::vector<int>{1}; auto q = new std::vector<int>(1); std::cout << p->at(0) ...


3

No! A new-initializer may take the following forms: new-initializer:    ( expression-listopt)    braced-init-list And: [C++11: 5.3.4/15]: A new-expression that creates an object of type T initializes that object as follows: If the new-initializer is omitted, the object is default-initialized (8.5); if no ...


8

There might be difference in contexts involving std::initializer_list<>, e.g.: Case 1 - () and {} #include <initializer_list> #include <iostream> using namespace std; struct Test2 { Test2(initializer_list<int> l) {} }; int main() { Test2* test3 = new Test2(); // compile error: no default ctor Test2* test4 = new ...


0

If response is always null then the second constructor holds good. Both the constructor are doing similar functionality. Its better to have one constructor for better readability of code.


7

You can't combine both constructors into one. But you can declare main constructor that construct your fields, and the other constructors just call it, for example. // new constructor public DataResponse(DataErrorEnum error, DataStatusEnum status) { this(null, error, status); } public DataResponse(String response, DataErrorEnum error, ...


0

As others suggested, it seems to be a good idea to use any IDependencyResolver implementation. Unfortunately for me this didn't solve the problem that WebAPI needs a parameterless contructor in their ApiController based classes. => I simply use property injection instead of contructor injection in my web api controller base class and provide an empty ...


0

Just for clarification, when you did composition by adding A classA private object to class C, the compiler accept this step because A has undefined constructor which means the compiler will make a default constructor for you and call it when make A classA. The problem in class B because it has a non-default user defined constructor which means that ...


3

You didn't actually declare a constructor for class C. What you meant to do was this: class C { public: C() : b(&a) // you have to provide the arguments to B's constructor here { } private: A a; B b; // ... not here };


1

You need to register the IEmailConfig interface with the CustomConfiguration class in the container. Container.RegisterType<IEmailConfig , CustomConfiguration >(new ContainerControlledLifetimeManager());



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