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0

You could do it a'la JQuery passing a literal object to the class. Initialize like this: // don't break if called without arguments if(arguments == undefined) arguments = {}; // setting default value this.x = arguments.x || 'some default value'; // checking for object this.x = (typeof arguments.x === 'object') ? arguments.x.property : arguments.x; ...


0

Well, that took me some time to realize, but if the problem lies in the fact, that we can't create objects of type policy because its destructor is protected, then why don't we host it in a temporary forwarding class? Ptr implicit conversion operator: template< class target_safety > operator Ptr<T, target_safety>() const { std::cout ...


1

Your class must be in 2 packages. If you don't mention any explicit access modifier Java will consider them as default access modifier. Then you can only access them through the same package only. Access Modifiers (From least access to highest access) private - Only within same class default - Only within same package protected - same package + children ...


2

Since you are not mentined any modifier the access modifier is now default, that means it is visible only within its own package If you try to use it out side the package, you'll face the current error. Try to read :What is the default access modifier in java? If you did'nt get understood what @BackSlash is commenting, check the below link Problem with ...


7

No access modifier for your constructor makes it package private. Assuming that First and Second are in the same package, you can call Second's constructors from first. Another class from another package, however, cannot access any of the constructors.


0

here a working console application sample class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { Test<string> t1 = new Test<string>(action: MyMethod1); Test<string> t2 = new Test<string>(function: MyMethod2); Test<string> t = new Test<string>(); ...


6

The return value of a method is not part of its signature. Only the parameters are considered. Hence, the compiler cannot distinguish between Action<T> and Func<T,T>. A detailed explanation and workarounds can be found in this StackOverflow question


1

You can try renaming the parameters for each of your constructors like so: public class Test<T> { public Test() { } public Test(Action<T> action) { } public Test(Func<T,T> function) { } } So when you instantiate your class you can specify the name of the parameter like so: var objectWithAction = new ...


0

Fact method / constructor overloading can recognize the correct method by the parameter types but does not include the return type. Reason And since in both of the mentioned constructor calls in the question the parameter is of type MethodGroup so the compiler is unable to determine the correct overload. secondly calls to the method are successful as that ...


2

See the "perfect initialization" approach taken by N4064 for std::pair and std::tuple which involves testing std::is_constructible<T, U>::value and std::is_convertible<U, T>::value If both are true, there is an implicit conversion, if only the first is true the conversion is explicit. The solution is to define two overloads for the constructor, ...


0

Change $connStr to: $connStr = "mysql:host=". $dbhost .";dbname=". $dbname;


5

Connection string should be $connStr = "mysql:host=$dbhost;dbname=$dbname";


-1

Privtate members of a class cannot be inherited by its subclass because private members of the super class cannot be directly accessible by the subclasses inside them


0

If you really need to create an Activity that has a constructor (because, say, you're creating an Activity that will be launched by another app, such as the edit activity of a Tasker plugin), you can do it by using a derived class, as so: class BaseActivity extends Activity { public BaseActivity(String parameter) { // Do something with ...


0

Use an injection library. The link below presents a great list of injection libraries out there and comparison of their performance http://www.palmmedia.de/blog/2011/8/30/ioc-container-benchmark-performance-comparison I would suggest however that performance is rarely a criteria you would choose an injection library on, most applications wouldn't ...


1

Good question! The Array constructor function (with can be used without new), when passed more than 1 argument, creates an array containing the arguments passed in as its elements. So you can do this: Array(1, 2, 3); // => [1, 2, 3] As you probably know, Function.prototype.apply allows you to provide arguments to a function in the form of an array. So ...


0

According to the The ECMAScript Language Specification, The initial value of Object.prototype.constructor is the standard built-in Object constructor. In other words, it's just a pointer to the Object's actual, native constructor-- The one that is called via new Object(). Thus, you can override it without changing anything about how new Object() ...


2

If you don't mind passing the pointer to A's constructor, this may be what you want: class A { public: A(const char* p); private: Foo m_foo; }; A::A(const char* p) : m_foo(p) // <- calls Foo's ctor here { }


6

Use the member initialization list for the A constructor : A::A() : m_foo(...) { } You can get the char* required to build m_foo from : A constructor : A::A(char* p) : m_foo(p) {} Or another function : A::A() : m_foo(GetBuffer()) {}


9

According to http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh567368.aspx The constructor inheritance is not implemented in any of the existing Visual C++ compilers :( However if we have the patience to wait some more time, according to http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2014/06/11/c-11-14-feature-tables-for-visual-studio-14-ctp1.aspx the upcoming release will ...


0

Constructors does not have a return type.Constructor returns an instance of the type.Constructor should have the same name as that of the class.


0

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import javax.swing.*; public class NewClass { public NewClass(){ //inputGUI(); } public static void method(){ JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, ""); } private static void inputGUI() { JFrame inputFrame = new JFrame(); JPanel panel = new JPanel(); JButton printButton = new ...


0

Following code is causing the problem. printButton.addActionListener(this); Reason: inputGUI() is static as a result of which using this keyword which refers to the current object is denied. Solution: Simply create a new object of the class which handles the click events of printButton. Say MainClass is responsible for that. Change your code as ...


0

Tldr: The other answers have tackled the "why" of the question. I'll provide a hack around this limitation: The basic idea is to hijack the super statement with your embedded statements. This can be done by disguising your statements as expressions. Tsdr: Consider we want to do Statement1() to Statement9() before we call super(): public class Child ...


0

The constructor is a method which is automatically called on class instantiation. Which means the contents of a constructor are processed without separate method calls. The contents of a the class keyword parenthesis are passed to the constructor method.


1

"it may also invoke constexpr constructors", Y::Y() is not constexpr constructor so B bobj falls to dynamic initialization.


2

A constructor in AspectJ syntax is represented by the "method name" new, i.e. if you want to capture all constructor executions the pointcut is execution(* *.new(..))


0

You can have the code in one constructor and call it from another by using this (parameters list); Hopefully an if else block is enough to differentiate between different flows.


0

The best practice is to call the other constructor using this(..) but if only a few lines of code is common between two constructors then the only option I think is to implement a common method and call the method from the constructors.


3

You can call this(param1,param2) to invoke one constructor from the other. Broccoli(int fibre_count, int flavor_amount, int vitamin_count){ this (fibre_count,flavor_amount,some_default_preserve,vitamin_count); } You should always call the constructor with more parameters from the contsructor with less parameters, and give default values to the ...


1

They need to be created in the constructor Player::Player() { input = new InputCp; physics = new PhysicsCp; graphics = new GraphicsCp; } But make sure you don't leak them, so delete them in your destructor Player::~Player() { delete input; delete physics; delete graphics; }


5

Just don't use pointers : Do : class Player { public: Player(); void update(); void draw(); private: InputCp input; PhysicsCp physics; GraphicsCp graphics; }; And your default constructors will be called for you. Note: If you really need pointers (and the fact is that you rarely do), use smart pointers ...


1

Constructor overloading is the nicest/cleanest solution. If you only want to have just one constructor you could use a params array. This only works if the parameters are of the same type. public clas BOX { public BOX (params double[] d) { switch(d.Length) { case 3: height = d[0]; ...


4

You can create multiple constructors calling each other: public BOX(double h) : this(h, h, h) { } public BOX(double h, double l) : this(h, l, h) { } public BOX(double h, double l, double b) { height = h; length = l; breadth = b; } Another solution is to use default values of null: public BOX(double h, double? l = null, double? b = null) { ...


2

I have seen this question and it is one of the many sample question to prepare you for SUN Certication. You can find the question in this doc: Sun Certification. There are some sites that have this question, however they are missing components or is written incorrectly which will not compile, however the answer is still 420; I will assume the the OP copy ...


4

One fairly important difference is that unless you take steps to deal with the issue, the returned object in B would not have the "Person" prototype.


0

You might be getting NullPointerException, as message might be null. Try: if (message != null) { to.setText(message.getFrom()[0].toString()); subject.setText("RE: " + message.getSubject()); text.setText((String) message.getContent()); }


0

If you really-really want "private" variable, you might want to define your methods as closures: class Book constructor: (t, nop) -> # Those are two local variables: title = t numberOfPages = nop # The following closures will have access to the two variable above: @title = -> title # ...


0

Your example looks like a bad practice. This way it is much easier to maintain, I'd go like so: function OriginalConstructor(id, number){ this.id = id; this.number = number; } var Obj = new OriginalConstructor(); function newConstructor(Obj){ this.id = Obj.id; this.number = Obj.number * 2; } newObject = new newConstructor(Obj); What ...


2

You create a function that sets the properties as you defined and calls the original constructor. For example: function modifyConstructor(Constr) { function NewConstructor(id, data) { this.id = id; this.data = data; // Call original constructor Constr.apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 2)); } // ...


1

If you look at the generated JS code, you will notice that those are more like "private" static class properties, not "private" instance properties: var Book; Book = (function() { var numberOfPages, title; title = null; numberOfPages = null; function Book(t, nop) { title = t; numberOfPages = nop; } Book.prototype.ripOutPages = ...


0

A couple of things that might be an issue here: 1) Are you running your GUI on the EventDispatchThread? this is mandatory for java swing GUI to be able to work properly. The main reason for this is concurrency. Details here. 2) Are you re-rendering your combobox? it is important that you do this because changes to GUI elements may not be immediately shown. ...


3

gui = new GameActivity(); The activity object you're passing updates to is different from the one that displays your UI. Never instantiate activities yourself with new. Their lifecycle methods won't be invoked and they won't be good for anything. In this case you'd get an NPE at textView1.setText() since onCreate() has not been run. Instead, pass a ...


0

Something is going wrong in you constructor. When an exception is throw in the constructor, Wicket catches it an displays that message. Does the field 'date' have a getter and setter? These are required for the PropertyModel in DateTextField.


2

this is not a Constructor but a normal method, you have to remove the void to be a constructor: public Message() {...} NOT public void Message(){...}


2

Wrong constructor declaration , public void Message() { } should be public Message() { }: public class Message { public Message() { // <-- Here's the correct constructor declaration System.out.println("Constructor Method!"); } public String helloWorld() { return "Hello, World!"; } }


2

Why are you thinking that constructor method should print? It will not print. Because you have not declare a constructor. You just only have 2 methods. This is not a constructor. this is just another method. Constructors doesn't have a return type. public void Message() { // constructor method System.out.println("Constructor Method!"); } ...


2

problem: public void Message() { It is not a constructor, it is a method thus it is not called upon creating the instance of your class it should be this: public Message()


8

This does not declare a constructor: public void Message() { Constructors have no return type; this is a method. Remove void: public Message() {


3

You are not passing a default value, you are passing a type, if you want to pass default parameters you have to specify some value: scala> case class Operator(operation: String) defined class Operator scala> case class MyCaseClass(left:Long, right: Long = 0L, operator: Operator = Operator("+")){ | def inRange(outer: Long) = outer >= ...



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