New answers tagged

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It seems it the latest delphi version (Seattle) this compiler error is not emitted anymore. I had the same issue we an application, but only when compiled with DelphiXe8 not with delphi Seattle


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A common strategy in implementing UI programs is to use Model-View-Controller approach. In your program, Swing classes would be the view, while Person and ArrayList<Person> would be the model. Views need access to the data from the model in order to display relevant parts to end users. There are three common ways of giving views access to the relevant ...


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If you want one Game to have a single string title, and a list of rating tuples, you want only one constructor, not multiple: type Title = String type Rating = (String, Int) data Game = Game Title [Rating] Then you can define a game with just a single call to the Game constructor: stDatabase :: [Game] testDatabase = [Game "example" [("Amy",5), ...


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Yes, you can, but you need to put Ratings before each tuple in the list: testDatabase = [Title "example", Ratings ("Amy",5), Ratings ("Bill",8), Ratings ("Ian",7), Ratings ("Megan",4)] You can also omit the tuple in this case: data Game = Title String | Ratings String Int testDatabase = [Title "example", Ratings "Amy" 5, Ratings "Bill" 8 ...] ...


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Throwing an exception when appropriate is part of a constructor's job. Let's consider why we have constructors at all. One part is convenience in having a method that sets various properties, and perhaps does some more advanced initialisation work (e.g. a FileStream will actually access the relevant file). But then if it was really that convenient all the ...


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As far I understand your question, you may be want something like this. class file: final int CONSTANT = 3; public class MakeArray { public int[] demo; public MakeArray() { demo = new int[CONSTANT]; for(int i=0; i<CONSTANT; i++) { demo[i]=i; } } } main class: MakeArray trial = new ...


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Creating an array like this won't work because arrays aren't normal objects but special ones. So you can't just make an object that works the same as an array, instead make a static method (one that can be called without having an instance of a class) and make it return an array, like this: static final int CONSTANT = 3; public static int[] MakeArray() { ...


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One way to do it is to add an instance variable in your class and its corresponding getter method: final int CONSTANT = 3; int[] demo; public MakeArray() { demo = new int[CONSTANT]; for(int i=0; i<CONSTANT; i++) { demo[i]=i; } } public getArray(){ return demo; } Now you can call from main: MakeArray arr = new ...


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You cannot access the MakeArray object as an array. You could however create a method returns said array: class MakeArray { public static int[] makeArray() { int[] demo = new int[CONSTANT]; for(int i=0; i<CONSTANT; i++) { demo[i]=i; } return demo; } } Then you can use it like that: int[] trial ...


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You don't appear to want a new instance of a MakeArray I suggest you make it an utility method. From my Main: int[] trial = MakeArray.newArray(3); System.out.println(trial[0] + ", " + trial[1] + ", "+trial[2]); with a utlity class defined as enum MakeArray { ; static int[] newArray(int n) { int[] demo = new int[n]; for (int i = ...


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All of your examples are invalid. You will get a compiler error when you try to instantiate any method: template <typename T> struct Test { Test* testPtr; void testMethod(Test<T> notAPointer) { this->testPtr = notAPointer; } }; int main() { Test<int> t1, t2; t1.testMethod(t2); // This line will cause the ...


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Your last constructor is a copy constructor. It's forbidden to have a copy constructor that passes its parameter by value, as otherwise you'd end up with infinite recursion. The error you're getting is similar to struct Foo { Foo(Foo); }; Live on Coliru More precisely, according to the standard: 12.8/2 Copying and moving class objects [class.copy] ...


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The normal lifecycle of an object is interrupted if an exception is thrown in a instance constructor. So if the object has a destructor to clean up any resources then an exception thrown in the constructor will prevent the destructor running and thus forms a memory leak. Always catch, clean up, and re-throw if you have any disposable resources allocated in ...


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You need this.myMethod() in JS class constructor and methods. class myClass { constructor() { this.myMethod(); } // END constructor myMethod() { console.log("myMethod"); } } // END myClass myMethod() calls a function named myMethod outside of the class. fucntion myMethod() { console.log("external function!"); } class ...


2

Can you use a throw or try and catch within a constructor? Both are possible. If an exception can happen during construction of an object instance, and there is something you can do about it, catch it and try to fix it. If there is nothing you can do about the exception, it is generally best to allow it to propagate (rather than leaving the object ...


3

initializer_list seems a better choice, but with variadic template, it should be something like: template<typename T> class Nodes { private: unsigned m_numParams; std::vector<std::shared_ptr<T>> m_vNodes; public: Nodes() : m_numParams(0), m_vNodes{nullptr} {} template <typename ... Ts> explicit Nodes( ...


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Quotation from Fowler and Beck book: "Refactoring" Long Parameter List In our early programming days we were taught to pass in as parameters everything needed by a routine. This was understandable because the alternative was global data, and global data is evil and usually painful. Objects change this situation because if you don't have something ...


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It might just be that it's easier to see whats going on than having a large comma separated list. This might also be a nice place to use Double Brace Initialization: String a = "text1"; String b = "text2"; SampleModel sm = new SampleModel() {{ setA(a); setB(b); }}; ArrayList<SampleModel> sampleList = new ArrayList<>() {{ add(sm); }}; ...


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It depends on how the class will be used. For example, an immutable class will need a constructor that takes arguments, and no setters. But a Java Bean will need a no-argument constructor, and setters. Some things to consider: Encapsulation can be valuable. Other than special cases like JavaBeans, usually the interface of the class can be designed based ...


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Whether I use accessors and mutators for a class variable depends on two things: Whether the variable is essential or optional to the object. Whether it might ever change in the course of using the object, or whether it is final. Variables that are necessary and final should be in the constructor, in my opinion, and should not have mutators. Variables ...


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A constructor that takes arguments is essentially for convenience (although that's not always the case if the object requires arguments in order to be constructed properly, it is here without seeing anymore context); it's doing the exact same thing as the set methods are doing. There is no reason to not have a constructor take arguments, as long as those ...


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Seems that you miss two things here. First, this.animation = window.requestAnimationFrame(this.play.bind(this)); line is invoked always when play() is called. Contrary to what you might think, cancelAnimationFrame only removes the previously requested RAF call. Strictly speaking, it's not even necessary here. Second, you don't have to bind on each RAF call; ...


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Assuming the array obj should be used outside the loop I would suggest using a std::vector instead, declared before the loop. Then you have two alternatives: Declare the vector and reserve enough memory (so the data doesn't have to be reallocated when adding new elements), then call emplace_back to add new elements. std::vector<area> obj; ...


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Just write :) area obj(p,q,r,s,l,m,n,o); obj.findArea(); obj.display(); As for the statement area obj[i](p,q,r,s,l,m,n,o); then you may not initialize arrays such a way. And it does not make sense to define an array within the loop.


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Yes, it is fine and will compile (barring the syntax and access to the constructor). To create the type Enemy, a BoundingBox is required; in particular the Enemy constructor accepts the argument as a const& thus allowing temporary values to be used. To create the BoundingBox, no argument, one float or two floats can be used. The variation is because ...


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From a design perspective, I think you are going about it the wrong way. While you might be able to hack something together to solve your constructor problem, you are trying to use the Box class for two incompatible uses. Instead you should have two separate classes. FileHelpers is a library for describing csv files so that you can import them easily. You ...


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This syntax is needed because IconReference has an "automatically implemented property": public int ResourceId { get; set; } see also http://stackoverflow.com/a/7670854/121309


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The this() in C# calls the parameterless constructor. Since you don't have a parameterless constructor in C# (and structs can't even contain "explicit parameterless constructors"), you can omit the this(). And so for the VB.NET code. You can omit the Me.New() code.


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First, make sure that the base class has a constructor that can initialize its member variables properly. class Creature { public: Creature(int a, int b): armor(a), strength(b) {} private: int armor; int strength; }; Unless the derived class has other member data that need to be initialized, you can use the following construct to be ...


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Allow setting them these variables in a constructor in the base class: class Creature { public: Creature(); protected: Creature(int armor_, int strength_) : armor(armor_), strength(strength_){} int armor; int strength; }; Now in the derived class, just pass these to the base class: Human(int armor_, int strength_) : ...


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You can create a constructor in base class that takes str and armor as parameters and then pass them to the base constructor in the constructor of the derived class. class Creature { public: Creature(int a, int s) : armor(a), strength(s) {}; protected: int armor; int strength; }; class Human: public Creature { public: Human(int a, ...


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If you are using Python 3, it is recommended to simply call super() without any argument: class Car(object): condition = "new" def __init__(self, model, color, mpg): self.model = model self.color = color self.mpg = mpg class ElectricCar(Car): def __init__(self, battery_type, model, color, mpg): ...


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If you make type B a property in type A then you can change the property of B to a new value, however this will not change the value of B outside the type A, in order to change the value of type B. If you just used a function you can use the keyword out but this will not be the cause for your example. Here is an example of what you can do public class B { ...


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I can think of a few ways off hand, you'll have to choose the one that best suits your situation. The easiest way to accomplish this would be to make a static variable on object A to store object B. This will only work if you truly want all instances of A to share B. public class A { private static B _b; public A(b) { _b = b; } ...


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You can use SingletonPattern to achieve this kind of functioanlity. Something like you create a single instance of B and use the same instance all over the life cycle of the application. For easy implementation you can make the instance of B as static. But be careful for the multithread application. You need to make the implementation ThreadSafe for that. ...


3

public class B { public string Name { get; set; } } public class A { private B _b; public A(B b) { _b = b; //do stuff } public string FuncOne() { //somehow change value of B _b.Name = "New Name"; } }


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Base class constructor: Subscriber(const char *name, int age); Derived class constructor: Student(const char *name, int age, const char *sName) :Subscriber(name, age) // We call the base class constructor { // Do something with sName. } It depends on what you would like to achieve, but generally it is preferred to keep the parameters as ...


1

You've got a pseudo-constructor which is not being called. Constructors have no return type, not void, not anything. Change // this never gets called public void testmain() { } to // but this **will** be called public testmain() { } As an aside, you will want to learn and use Java naming conventions. Variable names should all begin with a lower ...


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No. If your base class provides a parametered constructor, you can't provide a parameterless one in a derived class unless you redefine the base class to also have a parameterless constructor. Where would the values come from? If your base was actually a struct instead, it would be possible because of the default parameterless constructor defined by ...


1

Yes, if it inherits from it you can just do constructor chaining public class Box { int Width; int Height; int Length; public Box(int width, int height, int length) { this.Width = width; this.Height = height; this.Length = length; } } public class ProductBox : Box { string Name; public ...


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Class.forName("className").newInstance() always invokes no argument default constructor. To invoke parametrized constructor instead of zero argument no-arg constructor, You have to get Constructor with parameter types by passing types in Class[] for getDeclaredConstructor method of Class You have to create constructor instance by passing values in ...


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You get the same value because public PassingObjects(PassingObjects obj) is a copy-constructor, which initializes the new object with the same values as the object given as the parameter. height = obj.height; length = obj.length; width = obj.width; Here you set the values of the variables from the parameter object to this new object. So the ...


3

"The 1st one looks appealing because I can guarantee all requirements for using my class have been met after the constructor has run ...." This must be the case otherwise the design is bad. When the constructor completes then the object must be usable without any undefined behaviour and according to its interface specification. BUT that does not mean ...


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Move the code from MyObject::initialize to MyObject's constructor (the throw as well, if necessary). Now the implicitly-defined default constructor for MyClass will do the right job.


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Are we not missing the following constructor in the class declaration of Vector_container? Vector_container(std::initializer_list<double> s) : v(s) { } // Vector of s elements Of course you're right. LIVE error: no matching constructor for initialization of 'Vector_container' Vector_container vc {10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0}; ...


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Here you are doing few things incorrectly: // You have created object once here, this object would become unused in next line OrderLine orderLine = new OrderLine(); // Here you are building a new object via Deserialize orderLine = orderLine.createFromJsonString("MyJsonString"); What I understood from your question is you want to have a factory method to ...


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One way to achieve this would be to add a getter method inside your A class which exposes the instance of B: public class A { private B b; public A() { b = new B(); } public B getB() { return b; } } Usage: A a = new A(); B myB = a.getB();


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How about class A { private B b; public A() { // initializing object B b = new B(); } public B getB () { return b; } } from mainClass A a = new A(); B b = a.getB ();


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You actually want to set the fields in the constructor, they won't just be copied by magic. Right now they are just being ignored. You'd want a change like the following in both constructors: this.title = title; this.author = author; You also want something similar to set body as well. this.body = body;


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you have to set atributes with params values in the constructor: public Documents(String title, String author){ version = 0; this.title = title; this.author = author; } public Documents(String title, String author, String body){ version = 1; this.title = title; this.author = ...



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