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27

Your code is not working because it violates the default Content Security Policy. I've created a screencast of one minute to show what's wrong: First, I've shown how to debug the problem. Right-click on your popup button, and click on "Inspect popup". After doing that, you will see the following error message: Refused to execute inline script because ...


22

I wrestled with this issue for the past 12 hours and finally got it to work. Why did it take so long? Because I got thrown off the trail multiple times. First, the false leads: "Make it HTTPS" -- Doesn't matter. My Chrome extension now makes regular HTTP calls to a different domain and works just fine. (UPDATE: A little more clarification. The "make it ...


15

Just make it use the https protocol instead. The error you're getting is regarding the Content Security Policy. See the Relaxing the default policy section of the page. It mentions that you can only whitelist HTTPS, chrome-extension, and chrome-extension-resource.


13

That's something that is easier tested than answered. I've added X-Content-Security-Policy: allow 'self' header to a webpage and I can confirm it: bookmarklets don't run, they fall under the no inline scripts restriction. Allowing inline scripts by adding options inline-script to the header allows bookmarklets as well however. PS: According to ...


11

One of the consequences of "manifest_version": 2 is that Content Security Policy is enabled by default. And Chrome developers chose to be strict about it and always disallow inline JavaScript code - only code placed in an external JavaScript file is allowed to execute (to prevent Cross-Site Scripting vulnerabilities in extensions). So instead of defining ...


9

Extensions should bypass a page's Content Security Policy when executing XMLHTTPRequest from a content script. They currently aren't, which is a bug. I've filed https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=104480 to take a look at fixing it. Are you executing XHR from your extension's content script, or are you executing it in the background page? The latter ...


8

The syntax you have is fine, the problem is that your http://mysite.com source is not secure. The "whitelist only secure resources" part of the Chrome error message refers to this. You'll need to use https://mysite.com.


7

Let's start with the easiest problem: Refused to execute inline script because ... $('div', this) selects all <div> elements within a <td>. In the source code you provided, the following event handler can be found: <div class="smallfont"> <span style="cursor:pointer" onclick="window.open('member.php?u=47995', ...


6

At the time the question was asked, there was a bug preventing Firebase from working in Chrome extensions, but this has now been fixed. The correct CSP is: "content_security_policy": "script-src 'self' https://cdn.firebase.com https://*.firebaseio.com; object-src 'self'" (Note that the wildcard in the domain is important, since Firebase may connect to ...


6

GWT 2.5.1 has finally fixed this problem. The release notes documenting this are here: https://developers.google.com/web-toolkit/release-notes#Release_Notes_2_5_1 and they state that: "Apps built with DirectInstallLinker should work in a page where inline scripts are forbidden (e.g. a Chrome extension)" This means that it is now possible to use ...


6

Both angular and jquery works with CSP without any problems. But angular needs extra configuration for this :ngCsp In short, you will have to add ng-csp directive to the <html> tag. This will tell angular that CSP is enabled, and it will not try to do things forbidden by CSP.


6

Have you tried adding the CSP line to your manifest as per your CSP link? "content_security_policy": "script-src 'self' 'unsafe-eval'; object-src 'self'"


5

The CSP cannot cause the problem you've described. It's very likely that you're using JSONP instead of plain JSON. JSONP does not work in Chrome, because JSONP works by inserting a <script> tag in the document, whose src attribute is set to the URL of the webservice. This is disallowed by the CSP. Provided that you've set the correct permission in the ...


5

I just posted a very similar answer for the question http://stackoverflow.com/a/11670319/422670 As is said, there's no way to relax the inline security policy in v2 extensions. unsafe-inline simply does not work, intentionally. There really is no other way than moving all your javascript into js files and point to them with a <script src>. There's, ...


5

There're multiple issues: CSP headers do not work this way. CSP only has granularity of a single host+port combination (origin). If you cannot allow any script in your host to have unsafe-eval, no script can have it. The only possible workaround is to not use a script that requires unsafe-eval (good luck writing a MathJax replacement by yourself). The ...


5

Be sure to disable all Chrome Extensions when testing the CSP on your site - AdBlock and PhotoZoom extensions, for instance, both add their own inline styles to the DOM which trigger a violation (and subsequent hit to report-uri if you have that feature enabled, and others extensions likely do the same.


5

According to the grammar in the CSP spec, you need to specify schemes as scheme:, not just scheme. So, you need to change the image source directive to: img-src 'self' data:;


5

The Content-Security-Policy header only makes sense on HTML pages. A security header that would make sense for a image or other resource would be Access-Control-Allow-Origin. But that is restrictive by default, so you don't need to do anything with that.


4

You're probably using an inline <style>.selector { ... }</style> in your head. Your CSP prevents you from doing this. Instead, use a <link rel...>. For more info, see this nice article on the topic: https://mikewest.org/2011/10/secure-chrome-extensions-content-security-policy


4

The best solution to this problem is to pre-compile your templates before you deploy your extension. Both handlebarsjs and eco offer pre-compilation as a feature. I actually wrote a blog post that goes into more depth.


4

Google Chrome has a github repo with lots of extension examples. There are two sandboxing examples: This one builds Handlebars templates (which require eval) inside a hidden sandboxed iframe and then passes data out to the extension at large using postMessage. This other one has a visible sandboxed iframe which builds a framed page using unsafe ...


4

The connect-src directive does not relax the same-origin policy; it simply specifies a list of source to which you can connect, assuming that the browser will already allow you to connect to them (via CORS, for instance). In general, Content Security Policy is an annotation that you as an author can use to limit the capabilities of your pages. It does not ...


4

As the previous answer suggests when you update your extension to manifest version 2 the code of the extension and the code of the referred libraries have to be CSP compatible. Updating your jquery library should be enough. Jquery supported CSP with this bug: http://bugs.jquery.com/ticket/11249


4

Don't know if this will help but try the following: replace the setTimeout string parameter: function pump() { while (1) { game_loop(); var now = timeGetTime(); var time_diff = next_time - now; next_time += (1000 / 60); if (time_diff>0) { // we have time left setTimeout(pump, ...


4

I just spent two hours fighting with this. For me, and I think for this example as well, the problem lies in the src attribute; that is, in the http:. Changing the references as follows: <script type="text/javascript" src="https://www.google.com/recaptcha/api/challenge?k=your_public_key"> ^ v <iframe ...


4

The behavior is specified in mozillas wiki. CSP should not interfere with the operation of user-supplied scripts (such as browser add-ons and bookmarklets). Have a look here: https://wiki.mozilla.org/Security/CSP/Specification#Non-Normative_Client-Side_Considerations


4

The trick is not to use the element.click method but rather to create multiple MouseEvent. For this to work, you'd need to create one MouseEvent for each time you need a click. function clicker(el, clickCount) { var mousedownEvent; while(clickCount--) { mousedownEvent = document.createEvent("MouseEvent"); mousedownEvent.initMouseEvent("click", ...


4

The key part is the user agent cannot determine whether an inline script was injected by an attacker. To provide protection, CSP has to prevent substrings controlled by an attacker from causing code to run. Since the user agent does not know which parts of the HTML were specified by untrusted inputs, and which come from a template written by a trusted ...


4

What you're showing is not a Chrome extension, but a Chrome app. Chrome extensions will let you relax the default Content Security Policy; Chrome Apps won’t. (source: CSP docs for Chrome apps; note: this page is different from CSP docs for Chrome extensions). The next line applies to apps and extensions: The Content security policy does not apply to a ...


3

The ability to add localhost to the CSP value was enabled by Chromium revision 151470, which is in Chrome 23 (currently in the dev channel, soon to be in the beta channel).



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