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98

ContentControl is a base class for controls that contain other elements and have a Content-property (for example, Button). ContentPresenter is used inside control templates to display content. ContentControl, when used directly (it's supposed to be used as a base class), has a control template that uses ContentPresenter to display it's content. EDIT: My ...


36

You need to use the FontWeight property to specify a bold font. However, you've probably noticed that ContentPresenter doesn't have that property. So you'll need to use the TextBlock.FontWeight attached property to tell the ContentPresenter that any text inside it should be bold. Try this: <ContentPresenter TextBlock.FontFamily="Tahoma" ...


26

OK, my solution was totally unnecessary, here are the only tutorials you will ever need for creating any user control: http://www.interact-sw.co.uk/iangblog/2007/02/14/wpfdefaulttemplate http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/37326/Lookless-Controls-Themes.aspx http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/35444/Defining-the-Default-Style-for-a-Lookless-Control.aspx ...


26

There is also another way. You can add in your ContentPresenter this attribute TextBlock.Foreground="YourColour" In this case you can also use animations over that property.


20

You can do this... <Window.Resources> <ResourceDictionary> <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBlock}" x:Key="WrappingStyle"> <Setter Property="TextWrapping" Value="Wrap"/> </Style> </ResourceDictionary> </Window.Resources> ...then where you define your ContentPresenter... ...


14

It's all ok, I have managed to answer this question myself, I was trying to modify the foreground/fontweight of the contentpresenter which doesn't contain a definition for foreground/fontweight all i simply needed to do was this: <Setter Property="FontWeight" Value="Bold"/> <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="White"/> i.e. remove the: ...


12

ContentPresenter is usually used in a ControlTemplate, as a placeholder to say "put the actual content here". A ContentControl can be used anywhere, not necessarily in a template. It will pick up any DataTemplate defined for the type of content assigned to it


12

Not quite sure... but you might need to change this: Storyboard.TargetProperty="(TextBlock.Foreground).(SolidColorBrush.Color)" to this: Storyboard.TargetProperty="(TextBlock.Foreground).Color" as in this syntax "Foreground" and "SolidColorBrush" are the same object you seem to be duplicating it.


10

You just need to reference the defined resource: <ContentPresenter Content="{Binding X}" ContentTemplate="{StaticResource myTemplate}"/>


9

This property should only be used when the ContentPresenter is in a template. When a template contains a ContentPresenter with ContentSource set to "Abc", the Content, ContentTemplate, and ContentTemplateSelector properties of the ContentPresenter are automatically aliased to Abc, AbcTemplate, and AbcTemplateSelector, respectively. ...


8

A ContentPresenter is normally used when restyling existing controls. It is the place where the Content of a control is placed. Instead you should use a ContentControl, which is simply a control that has a content element. Alternatively, you could directly set the Content of your window. You extract the contents of your two existing windows into two ...


8

Suppose you have changed the DataGridCell Template to the following <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type DataGridCell}"> <Border BorderBrush="{TemplateBinding BorderBrush}" BorderThickness="{TemplateBinding BorderThickness}" Background="{TemplateBinding Background}" SnapsToDevicePixels="True"> <TextBlock Text="{Binding}"/> ...


7

The ItemTemplate of a ListBox is copied to the ContentTemplate of a ListBoxItem during UI generation. Meaning that your code is equivalent to the following. <ListBox> <ListBox.ItemTemplate> <DataTemplate> <DockPanel> <TextBlock><ContentPresenter /></TextBlock> ...


7

If you change the ContentPresenter to a ContentControl it works (in that it binds to your visibility properties - I'm ignoring the fact that your VM doesn't notify of changes): <ContentControl x:Name="ExpanderPresenter" ContentTemplate="{StaticResource ExpanderTemplate}" Visibility="{Binding ExpanderVisibility}" /> <ContentControl ...


7

Should be something like: <ContentPresenter Content="{Binding X}" ContentTemplate="{StaticResource myTemplate}"/> Although I wouldn't define a Template on a contentpresenter, I will select the correct template based on the type anyway.


7

Implicit Styles for elements that derive from UIElement, but not Control, are not applied if the element is defined in a control's Template unless the implict Style is defined in the application Resources. The same holds true for TextBlocks used by ContentPresenter. For example, in the following XAML the TextBlock that is ultimately used to present the ...


6

There are a couple things you can do to get the results you're looking for. Place the path in a viewbox and have it stretch to fill: <ControlTemplate x:Key="CurvedButton" TargetType="{x:Type Button}"> <Grid> <Viewbox Stretch="Fill"> <Path Fill="#ff951c1f" Data="F1 M 64,16 C 64,24 56,31 48,31 L 15,31 C 7,31 0,24 ...


6

I do it all the time - and the entire MVVM method is built on non-UIElement content, here is an example: Create a class that isn't derived from UIElement, I'll call is MyViewModelClass in this example. Create a Window and add this code public partial class Window1 : Window { public Window1() { DataContext = new MyViewModelClass(); ...


6

I found the reason of this behavior - it’s by design: If the Content of ContentControl is already a WPF-Element, it is created before using it in the ContenPresenter. The logical parent of the element is therefore ContentControl. I can check this through changing the ContentControl-markup to the following: <ContentControl Template="{StaticResource ...


6

Try changing your ContentPresenter to <ContentPresenter Content="{Binding DaysOfWeek[0]}" Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="0"> <ContentPresenter.ContentTemplate> <DataTemplate> <TextBlock Text="{Binding}"/> </DataTemplate> </ContentPresenter.ContentTemplate> ...


6

This is the problem:- <Setter Property="ChromeContent"> <Setter.Value> <Grid /> </Setter.Value> </Setter> You should not include a UIElement directly in a resource dictionary or as a value of a style. You might see the style as being some kind of descriptor but it isn't. The values in a style are constructed ...


6

Use DataTemplate.LoadContent(). Example: DataTemplate dataTemplate = this.Resources["MyDataTemplate"] as DataTemplate; FrameworkElement frameworkElement = dataTemplate.LoadContent() as FrameworkElement; frameworkElement.DataContext = myPOCOInstance; LayoutRoot.Children.Add(frameworkElement); ...


6

DataType, for whatever crazy reason, is of type Object, the DataTemplates hence have a string set in that property unless you use x:Type. Edit: There is a very good reason for the property being an object, as always those who can (and do) read are clearly at an advantage: If the template is intended for object data, this property contains the type ...


6

ContentPresenter is kind of a magic control. If you don't supply anything to it, it will automatically set the Content, ContentTemplate and ContentTemplateSelector property with a TemplateBinding to the TemplatedParent. Which means, you don't need to supply anything to it, just <ContentPresenter/> in your UserControl, and it should automatically use ...


6

I have recently wrote a post on my blog regarding these 2 controls: ContentPresenter vs ContentControl The ContentPresenter.ContentSource is actualy what makes the biggest difference between the 2 classes. ContentSource property has sense only in a ControlTemplate, it determines which TemplatedParent property the content should be mapped with. for example, ...


5

I can't help about Silverlight, but in the new WPF 4 it is TextElement rather than TextBlock


5

Based on this related answer, I was able to solve a similar issue with the following: <Setter TargetName="ctContentPresenter" Property="TextBlock.Foreground" Value="{StaticResource StyleForeColorBrush}" />


5

In order to get things working as you expect you would have to set the UserControl's Template: <UserControl x:Class="UserCtrl.UserControl1" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" ...


4

Hasta la victoria siempre! I have come with working solution (first on the internet, it seems to me :)) The tricky DialogControl.xaml.cs - see comments: public partial class DialogControl : UserControl { public DialogControl() { InitializeComponent(); //The Logical tree detour: // - we want grandchildren to inherit DC from this (grandchildren.DC ...


4

Here's the most basic example I can think of <Label Content="My Label" /> Now the content property is a string which doesn't derive from UIElement. So the short answer is yes, it's not only possible, it's likely to happen.



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