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247

Below is my (current) favorite demonstration of why parsing C++ is (probably) Turing-complete, since it shows a program which is syntactically correct if and only if a given integer is prime. So I assert that C++ is neither context-free nor context-sensitive. If you allow arbitrary symbol sequences on both sides of any production, you produce an Type-0 ...


93

First, you rightly observed there are no context sensitive rules in the grammar at the end of the C++ standard, so that grammar is context-free. However, that grammar doesn't precisely describe the C++ language, because it produces non-C++ programs such as int m() { m++; } or typedef static int int; The C++ language defined as "the set of well-formed ...


57

Yes. The following expression has a different order of operations depending on type resolved context: Edit: When the actual order of operation varies, it makes it incredibly difficult to use a "regular" compiler that parses to an undecorated AST before decorating it (propagating type information). Other context sensitive things mentioned are "rather easy" ...


46

An important detail here is that grammars do not accept strings; they generate strings. Grammars are descriptions of languages that provide a means for generating all possible strings contained in the language. In order to tell if a particular string is contained in the language, you would use a recognizer, some sort of automaton that processes a given ...


19

To answer your question, you need to distinguish two different questions. The mere syntax of almost every programming language is context-free. Typically, it is given as an extended Backus-Naur form or context-free gramar. However, even if a program conforms with the context-free gramar defined by the programming language, it is not necessarily a valid ...


12

Maybe you get a better understanding if you remember the automata generating these languages. Regular languages are generated by regular automata. They have no knowledge of the past so everytime you have a language with suffixes depending on prefixes (palindrome language) this can not be done with regular languages. Context-free languages are generated by ...


10

C++ is parsed with GLR parser. That means during parsing the source code, the parser may encounter ambiguity but it should continue and decide which grammar rule to use later. look also, Why C++ cannot be parsed with a LR(1) parser? Remember that context-free grammar can not describe ALL the rules of a programming language syntax. For example, Attribute ...


10

Yeah C++ is context sensitive, very context sensitive. You cannot build the syntax tree by simply parsing through the file using a context free parser because in some cases you need to know the symbol from previous knowledge to decide (ie. build a symbol table while parsing). First example: A*B; Is this a multiplication expression? OR Is this a ...


7

I have a feeling that there's some confusion between the formal definition of "context-sensitive" and the informal use of "context-sensitive". The former has a well-defined meaning. The latter is used for saying "you need context in order to parse the input". This is also asked here: Context-sensitivity vs Ambiguity. Here's a context-free grammar: ...


6

ANTLR parses only grammars which are LL(*). It can't parse using grammars for full context-sensitive languages such as the example you provided. I think what Parr meant was that ANTLR can parse some languages that require some (left) context constraints. In particular, one can use semantic predicates on "reduction actions" (we do this for GLR parsers ...


6

It's been a while since I've handled formal language theory, but I'll bite. "Context-free" means that the production rules required in the corresponding grammar do not have a "context". It does not mean that a specific symbol cannot appear in different rules. Addressing the edit: in other words (and more informally), deciding whether a language is ...


5

Yes, context-sensitive grammars (CSG) are powerful enough to make undefined/undeclared/unbound variables check, but unfortunately we don't know any efficient algorithm to parse strings of CSG. A real example of a context-sensitive language is the C programming language. A feature like declare variables first and then use them later make C-language a ...


5

No Algol-like language is context-free, because they have rules that constrain expressions and statements that identifiers can appear in based on their type, and because there's no limit on the number of statements that can occur between declaration and use. The usual solution is to write a context-free parser that actually accepts a superset of valid ...


5

How to write grammar for formal language? Before read my this answer you should read first: Tips for creating Context free grammars. Grammar for {an bm | n,m = 0,1,2,..., n <= 2m } What is you language L = {an bm | n,m = 0,1,2,..., n <= 2m } description? Language description: The language L is consist of set of all strings in which ...


4

The simplest case of non-context-free grammar involves parsing expressions involving templates. a<b<c>() This can parse as either template | a < expr > () | < / \ b c Or expr | < / \ a template | b < expr > () | c The two ASTs can only be ...


4

It is context-sensitive, as a b(c); has two valid parses- declaration and variable. When you say "If c is a type", that's context, right there, and you've described exactly how C++ is sensitive to it. If you didn't have that context of "What is c?" you could not parse this unambiguously. Here, the context is expressed in the choice of tokens- the parser ...


4

True :) J. Stanley Warford. Computer systems. Pages 341-346.


4

The question is clumsily worded, so I'm reading between the lines, here. Still, it's a common homework/study question. The various ambiguities [1] in the C grammar as normally presented do not render the language non-context-free. (Indeed, they don't even render the grammars non-context-free.) The general rule "if it looks like a declaration, it's a ...


3

These things aren't context-free in C: foo * bar; // foo multiplied by bar or declaration of bar pointing to foo? foo(*bar); // foo called with *bar as param or declaration of bar pointing to foo? foo bar[2] // is bar an array of foo or a pointer to foo? foo (bar baz) // is foo a function or a pointer to a function?


3

The textbook is in error. As you say, a CFG is a special case of a CSG. CSGs can express strictly more languages than CFGs can.


3

Sometimes it's worse: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/794015/what-do-people-mean-when-they-say-c-has-undecidable-grammar


3

C++ templates have been shown to be Turing Powerful. Although not a formal reference, here's a place to look in that regard: http://cpptruths.blogspot.com/2005/11/c-templates-are-turing-complete.html I will venture a guess (as old as a folkoric and concise CACM proof showing that ALGOL in the 60's could not be reprsented by a CFG) and say that C++ cannot ...


3

It means that L is the language of strings w consisting of symbols 'a', 'b'' and 'c', where the length of the string w equals to 3 times the number of symbol 'a' present in the string w. The productions for this grammars should be such that if it add one 'a' then it also adds two 'b', or two 'c', or one 'b'; one 'c'. Check below grammar: S → ^ | ...


3

Phrase structure and syntactic analysis (via a context-free or context-sensitive grammar, a dependency parser, etc.) would generally be performed in an earlier stage and used as input to sentiment analysis. You'd usually extract features from the parse tree and use in your sentiment classification stage (for example features, see the papers referenced ...


2

C++ is not context free. I learned it some time ago in compilers lecture. A quick search gave this link, where the "Syntax or semantics" section explains why C and C++ are not context free: Wikipedia Talk: Context-Free grammar Regards, Ovanes


2

I think that this grammar is context-free, unless I'm misinterpreting what you're saying. First, let's let A be the nonterminal that expands out to some valid string made just using the first two rules, we get A -> a | b | c | d | e | f Now, your second rule says that if you can build the string ω then you can build Sω. We could encode ...


2

As for regular languages, there are many equivalent characterizations. They give many different ways of looking at regular languages. It is hard to give a "plain English" definition, and if you find it hard to understand any of the characterizations of regular languages, it is unlikely that a "plain English" explanation will help. One thing to note from the ...


2

Context-sensitive grammar has symbols that change their meaning in relation with various nonterminals they are used in their context. In computer world, they are pretty rare, because it quite complicates writing of the parser - decision if a string belongs to a certain context-sensitive grammar is PSPACE-complete.


2

The productions in the C++ standard are written context-free, but as we all know don't really define the language precisely. Some of what most people see as ambiguity in the current language could (I believe) be resolved unambiguously with a context sensitive grammar. For the most obvious example, let's consider the Most Vexing Parse: int f(X);. If X is a ...



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