Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

92

I believe that continuations are a special case of callbacks. A function may callback any number of functions, any number of times. For example: var array = [1, 2, 3]; forEach(array, function (element, array, index) { array[index] = 2 * element; }); function forEach(array, callback) { var length = array.length; for (var i = 0; i < length; ...


74

The first thing to realize about the continuation monad is that, fundamentally, it's not really doing anything at all. It's true! The basic idea of a continuation in general is that it represents the rest of a computation. Say we have an expression like this: foo (bar x y) z. Now, extract just the parenthesized portion, bar x y--this is part of the total ...


73

I'll start with generators, seeing as they're the simplest case. As @zvolkov mentioned, they're functions/objects that can be repeatedly called without returning, but when called will return (yield) a value and then suspend their execution. When they're called again, they will start up from where they last suspended execution and do their thing again. A ...


62

"Implementing call/cc" doesn't really make sense at the layer you're working in; if you can implement call/cc in a language, that just means it has a built-in construct at least as powerful as call/cc. At the level of the language itself, call/cc is basically a primitive control flow operator, just like some form of branching must be. Of course, you can ...


60

[x for x in (1,2,3) ] works fine, so you can pretty much do as you please. I'd personally prefer [something_that_is_pretty_long for something_that_is_pretty_long in somethings_that_are_pretty_long] The reason why \ isn't appreciated very much is that it appears at the end of a line, where it either doesn't stand out or needs extra padding, ...


39

Try something simpler to see how this works. For example, here's a version of a list-sum function that receives a continuation argument (which is often called k): (define (list-sum l k) (if (null? l) ??? (list-sum (cdr l) ???))) The basic pattern is there, and the missing parts are where the interesting things happen. The continuation argument ...


38

Imagine if every single line in your program was a separate function. Each accepts, as a parameter, the next line/function to execute. Using this model, you can "pause" execution at any line and continue it later. You can also do inventive things like temporarily hop up the execution stack to retrieve a value, or save the current execution state to a ...


38

Before we introduce continuations we need to build some infrastructure. Below is a trampoline that operates on Iteration objects. An iteration is a computation that can either Yield a new value or it can be Done. sealed trait Iteration[+R] case class Yield[+R](result: R, next: () => Iteration[R]) extends Iteration[R] case object Done extends ...


35

On CPS While CPS is useful as an intermediate language in a compiler, on the source language level it is mostly a device to (1) encode sophisticated control flow (not really performance-related) and (2) transform a non-tail-call consuming stack space into a continuation-allocating tail-call consuming heap space. For example when you write (code untested) ...


34

It is concurrent, in the sense that many outstanding asychronous operations may be in progress at any time. It may or may not be multithreaded. By default, await will schedule the continuation back to the "current execution context". The "current execution context" is defined as SynchronizationContext.Current if it is non-null, or TaskScheduler.Current if ...


32

The general idea is correct - the remainder of the method is made into a continuation of sorts. The "fast path" blog post has details on how the async/await compiler transformation works. Differences, off the top of my head: The await keyword also makes use of a "scheduling context" concept. The scheduling context is SynchronizationContext.Current if it ...


29

My blog does explain what reset and shift do, so you may want to read that again. Another good source, which I also point in my blog, is the Wikipedia entry on continuation passing style. That one is, by far, the most clear on the subject, though it does not use Scala syntax, and the continuation is explicitly passed. The paper on delimited continuations, ...


29

Here's a somewhat informal answer, but hopefully useful. getCC' returns a continuation to the current point of execution; you can think of it as saving a stack frame. The continuation returned by getCC' has not only ContT's state at the point of the call, but also the state of any monad above ContT on the stack. When you restore that state by calling the ...


28

I found the existing explanations to be less effective at explaining the concept than I would hope. I hope this one is clear (and correct.) I have not used continuations yet. When a continuation function cf is called: Execution skips over the rest of the shift block and begins again at the end of it the parameter passed to cf is what the shift block ...


26

A good summary is available in Implementation Strategies for First-Class Continuations, an article by Clinger, Hartheimer, and Ost. I recommend looking at Chez Scheme's implementation in particular. Stack copying isn't that complex and there are a number of well-understood techniques available to improve performance. Using heap-allocated frames is also ...


26

What is a prompt, conceptually? Scheme in general has the idea of continuations, but Racket extends this with the idea of delimited continuations. The idea of a continuation is that it captures the remaining computation left to be evaluated. I will not attempt to explain continuations in general, since that is outside the scope of this question. However, I ...


24

When talking about continuations, you’ll have to distinguish between two different kinds of them: First-class continuations – Continuation-support that is deeply integrated in the language (Scheme or Ruby). Clojure does not support first-class continuations. Continuation-passing-style (CPS) – CPS is just a style of coding and any language supporting ...


24

Scala 2.11 The easiest way is to use sbt: scalaVersion := "2.11.6" autoCompilerPlugins := true addCompilerPlugin( "org.scala-lang.plugins" % "scala-continuations-plugin_2.11.6" % "1.0.2") libraryDependencies += "org.scala-lang.plugins" %% "scala-continuations-library" % "1.0.2" scalacOptions += "-P:continuations:enable" In your code (or the ...


23

Would you like to play a game? Today, you get to be callCC. callCC :: ((a-> (forall r . ContT m r)) -> ContT m a) -> ContT m a -- you are here ^^ Everything to the left of that function arrow are the moves your opponent has made. To the right of the arrow is the end of the game. To win, you must construct ...


21

Coroutine is one of several procedures that take turns doing their job and then pause to give control to the other coroutines in the group. Continuation is a "pointer to a function" you pass to some procedure, to be executed ("continued with") when that procedure is done. Generator (in .NET) is a language construct that can spit out a value, "pause" ...


21

They're called so because of the way they are implemented (in general). Quoted from Direct Implementation of Shift and Reset in the MinCaml Compiler By interpreting a program using the continuation semantics, we can regard the state of the program as a continuation stack. Then, reset can be thought of as marking the continuation stack, and ...


20

Not only are continuations monads, but they are a sort of universal monad, in the sense that if you have continuations and state, you can simulate any functional monad. This impressive but highly technical result comes from the impressive and highly technical mind of Andrzej Filinski, who wrote in 1994 or thereabouts: We show that any monad whose unit ...


20

So, people helped me with this one elsewhere. Here is the answer: reset ({ ... ...shift((k:A=>B) => ...::C)::A... ... }::B)::C So, shift is a hole of type A in a computation {...} of type B. The argument of shift returns a value of type C and that's why reset ({...}) has type C. The key trick in understanding this stuff was to see that ...


20

Here's fibonacci: fib 0 = 0 fib 1 = 1 fib n = fib (n-1) + fib (n-2) Imagine you have a machine without a call stack - it only allows tail recursion. How to execute fib on that machine? You could easily rewrite the function to work in linear, instead of exponential time, but that requires tiny bit of insight and is not mechanical. The obstacle to making ...


19

I've written a Clojure port of cl-cont which adds continuations to Common Lisp. https://github.com/swannodette/delimc


18

Monads are one particular way of structuring and sequencing computations. The bind of a monad cannot magically restructure your computation so as to happen in a more efficient way. There are two problems with the way you structure your computation. When evaluating stepN 20 0, the result of step 0 will be computed 20 times. This is because each step of the ...


17

Briefly, since the 'bind' of a monad takes an effective continuation (a lambda of the 'rest of the computation') as an argument, monads are continuations in that sense. On the flip side, continuation-passing style can be effectively implemented in a non-CPS language using monadic syntax sugars, as suggested by a number of misc links below. From the 'all ...


17

First of all, you don't need a continuation. According to the standard, Scheme will always perform tail call optimization. A tail call is a function call which is in the final position in a function; after that call is run, nothing else will happen. In that situation, we don't need to preserve the activation record we're currently in; as soon as the ...


17

This is where Control.Monad.Class comes in. Make bar polymorphic in what monad it can work in: bar :: MonadCont m => Int -> m Int bar m = return $ m * 2 Note that the instances list at the bottom of the page shows that the instances of MonadCont known at the time the docs were generated include both Cont r and Monad m => ContT r m. ...


16

I remember reading an article that may be of help to you: Cheney on the M.T.A. :-) Some implementations of Scheme I know of, such as SISC, allocate their call frames on the heap. @ollie: You don't need to do the hoisting if all your call frames are on the heap. There's a tradeoff in performance, of course: the time to hoist, versus the overhead ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible