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Edit : As you mentioned matplotlib is probably able to handle everything by itself using PdfPages function. See this related answer. My original answer is a hack. I think the error in your code is that you are creating another PdfPage object each time you go through the loop. My advice would be to add the PdfPage object as an argument to your ...


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I guess there is some mistake in your code (according to your data you shouldn't do x = data[:1] but more x = data[..., 1]). With your of data, the basic steps I will follow to interpolate the z value and fetch an output as a geojson would require at least the shapely module (and here geopandas is used for the convenience). import numpy as np import ...


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This approach works only on points. You don't need to create masks for this. The main idea is: Find defects on contour If I find at least two defects, find the two closest defects Remove from the contour the points between the two closest defects Restart from 1 on the new contour I get the following results. As you can see, it has some drawbacks for ...


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I came up with the following approach for detecting the bounds of the rectangle/square. It works based on few assumptions: shape is rectangular or square, it is centered in the image, it is not tilted. divide the masked(filled) image in half along the x-axis so that you get two regions (a top half and a bottom half) take the projection of each region on to ...


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To test if arrays are equal, you can use numpy.array_equal center_px = img[cy, cx] if np.array_equal(center_px, (0, 127, 255)): print("Orange")


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As a starting point and assuming the defects are never too big relative to the object you are trying to recognize, you can try a simple erode+dilate strategy before using cv::matchShapes as shown below. int max = 40; // depending on expected object and defect size cv::Mat img = cv::imread("example.png"); cv::Mat eroded, dilated; cv::Mat element = ...


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I'm a bit puzzled as to what you are looking for, but how about something like this? im <- with(df, akima::interp(x, y, z, nx = 1000, ny = 1000)) df2 <- data.frame(expand.grid(x = im$x, y = im$y), z = c(im$z)) ggplot(df2, aes(x, y, fill = z)) + geom_raster() + viridis::scale_fill_viridis()


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findContours treats white pixels as foreground, so for this case you could just invert your image. Assuming that you are always using a uniform background, you might want to use some preprocessing (like sobel or some kind of color classification) and then run findContours.


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We can solve this using the code which is usually used behind the scenes in the Stat. Having just released ggtern 2.0.1, published on CRAN a couple of days ago after completely re-writing the package to be compatible with ggplot2 2.0.0, I am familiar with an approach that may suit your needs. Incidentally, for you interest, a summary of the new functionality ...



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