Hot answers tagged

31

For a given path, you can get the points like this: p = cs.collections[0].get_paths()[0] v = p.vertices x = v[:,0] y = v[:,1]


30

There are a number of options (E.g. centered spines), but in your case, it's probably simplest to just use axhline and axvline. E.g. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt xvec = np.linspace(-5.,5.,100) x,y = np.meshgrid(xvec, xvec) z = -np.hypot(x, y) plt.contourf(x, y, z, 100) ...


30

Basically, you're wanting a density estimate of some sort. There multiple ways to do this: Use a 2D histogram of some sort (e.g. matplotlib.pyplot.hist2d or matplotlib.pyplot.hexbin) (You could also display the results as contours--just use numpy.histogram2d and then contour the resulting array.) Make a kernel-density estimate (KDE) and contour the ...


28

You need to interpolate your rho values. There's no one way to do this, and the "best" method depends entirely on the a-priori information you should be incorporating into the interpolation. Before I go into a rant on "black-box" interpolation methods, though, a radial basis function (e.g. a "thin-plate-spline" is a particular type of radial basis ...


21

contours is actually defined as vector<vector<Point> > contours; And now I think it's clear how to access its points. The contour area is calculated by a function nicely called contourArea(): for (unsigned int i = 0; i < contours.size(); i++) { std::cout << "# of contour points: " << contours[i].size() << ...


20

You can use std::sort with a custom comparison function object // comparison function object bool compareContourAreas ( std::vector<cv::Point> contour1, std::vector<cv::Point> contour2 ) { double i = fabs( contourArea(cv::Mat(contour1)) ); double j = fabs( contourArea(cv::Mat(contour2)) ); return ( i < j ); } Usage: [...] // ...


20

You can do this using the levels keyword in contourf. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt fig, axs = plt.subplots(1,2) x = np.linspace(0, 1, 100) X, Y = np.meshgrid(x, x) Z = np.sin(X)*np.sin(Y) levels = np.linspace(-1, 1, 40) zdata = np.sin(8*X)*np.sin(8*Y) cs = axs[0].contourf(X, Y, zdata, levels=levels) fig.colorbar(cs, ax=axs[0], ...


19

I'm guessing what you want to do is just extract the regions in the the detected contours. Here is a possible solution: using namespace cv; int main(void) { vector<Mat> subregions; // contours_final is as given above in your code for (int i = 0; i < contours_final.size(); i++) { // Get bounding box for contour Rect ...


19

You can create proxy artists to make the legend: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x, y = np.meshgrid(np.arange(10),np.arange(10)) z = np.sqrt(x**2 + y**2) cs = plt.contourf(x,y,z,levels=[2,3,4,6]) proxy = [plt.Rectangle((0,0),1,1,fc = pc.get_facecolor()[0]) for pc in cs.collections] plt.legend(proxy, ["range(2-3)", "range(3-4)", ...


19

You can start picking a contour (in your case, the contour corresponding to the hand). Then, you calculate the bounding rectangle for this contour. Finally you make a new matrix header from it. int n=0;// Here you will need to define n differently (for instance pick the largest contour instead of the first one) cv::Rect rect(contours[n]); cv::Mat miniMat; ...


19

Something like this? library(akima) # interpolation fld <- with(df, interp(x = Lon, y = Lat, z = Rain)) filled.contour(x = fld$x, y = fld$y, z = fld$z, color.palette = colorRampPalette(c("white", "blue")), xlab = "Longitude", ylab = "Latitude", ...


17

If you read the documentation it is mentioned this function implements the algorithm of: Suzuki, S. and Abe, K., Topological Structural Analysis of Digitized Binary Images by Border Following. CVGIP 30 1, pp 32-46 (1985) OpenCV is open source if you want to see how this is implemented just need to read the code: ...


17

Summary I'm guessing, but your problem is probably because you have an inherent transpose going on. 2D numpy arrays are indexed as row, column. "x, y" indexing is column, row. In this context, numpy.gradient is basically going to return dy, dx and not dx, dy. Try changing the line: dx, dy = np.gradient(zi) to: dy, dx = np.gradient(zi) Also, if ...


15

This is a difficult problem and any solution will not be perfect. Computer vision is jokingly known as an "AI-complete" discipline: if you solve computer vision and you have solved all of artificial intelligence. Background subtraction can be a good way of detecting objects. If you need to improve the background subtraction results, you might consider ...


15

If I understand correctly what you want, I think this should do it: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt xi = np.array([0., 0.5, 1.0]) yi = np.array([0., 0.5, 1.0]) zi = np.array([[0., 1.0, 2.0], [0., 1.0, 2.0], [-0.1, 1.0, 2.0]]) v = np.linspace(-.1, 2.0, 15, endpoint=True) plt.contour(xi, yi, zi, v, ...


14

Use the following function to convert to the format required by contourf: from numpy import linspace, meshgrid from matplotlib.mlab import griddata def grid(x, y, z, resX=100, resY=100): "Convert 3 column data to matplotlib grid" xi = linspace(min(x), max(x), resX) yi = linspace(min(y), max(y), resY) Z = griddata(x, y, z, xi, yi) X, Y = ...


14

As @aosmith already pointed out, just use the lim inside the scale_y_reverse library(ggplot2) set.seed(15) ggplot(data.frame(x=sort(runif(20, 0, 20)), y=cumsum(runif(20,0 ,2))), aes(x,y)) + geom_point() + scale_y_reverse( lim=c(10,0))


13

You could also do it directly with the lines of the contour, without using proxy artists. import matplotlib import numpy as np import matplotlib.cm as cm import matplotlib.mlab as mlab import matplotlib.pyplot as plt matplotlib.rcParams['xtick.direction'] = 'out' matplotlib.rcParams['ytick.direction'] = 'out' delta = 0.025 x = np.arange(-3.0, 3.0, delta) ...


13

You'll need a recent (>= 1.2) version of matplotlib, but streamplot does this. You just need to take the negative gradient of your head (a.k.a. "water table" for surface aquifers) grid. As a quick example generated from random point observations of head: import numpy as np from scipy.interpolate import Rbf import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # Make data ...


13

You can get the vertices back by looping over collections and paths and using the iter_segments() method of matplotlib.path.Path. Here's a function that returns the vertices as a set of nested lists of contour lines, contour sections and arrays of x,y vertices: import numpy as np def get_contour_verts(cn): contours = [] # for each contour line ...


12

The out-of-bounds colors can be set using the set_over and set_under methods of the colormap; see the documentation. You'll need to specify these values when you create your colormap. I don't see any matplotlibrc setting to set the default for this, though. You might also want to ask on the matplotlib mailing list. Edit: I see what is going on. The ...


12

Change this line cvtColor( image, gray_image, CV_RGB2GRAY ); to std::vector<cv::Mat> channels; cv::Mat hsv; cv::cvtColor( image, hsv, CV_RGB2HSV ); cv::split(hsv, channels); gray_image = channels[0]; The problem seems to be that your hand in gray scale is very close to the gray background. I have applied Canny on the hue (color) because the skin ...


12

Does plt.tricontourf(x,y,z) satisfy your requirements? It will plot filled contours for irregularly spaced data (non-rectilinear grid). You might also want to look into plt.tripcolor(). import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = np.random.rand(100) y = np.random.rand(100) z = np.sin(x)+np.cos(y) f, ax = plt.subplots(1,2, sharex=True, ...


11

Well, for this you have a couple of options depending on how robust you need your approach to be. Simple Solutions (with assumptions): For these methods, I'm assuming your the images you supplied are what you are working with (i.e., the objects are already segmented and approximately the same scale. Also, you will need to correct the rotation (at least in ...


11

[[major edit]] I was finally able to add contour lines to my original attempt, but since the two sides of the original matrix that gets contorted don't actually touch, the lines don't match up between 360 and 0 degree. So I've totally rethought the problem, but leave the original post below because it was still kind of cool to plot a matrix that way. The ...


11

I propose to generate a pseudo colorbar as follows (see comments for explanations): import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np from matplotlib.colors import LogNorm import matplotlib.gridspec as gridspec delta = 0.025 x = y = np.arange(0, 3.01, delta) X, Y = np.meshgrid(x, y) Z1 = plt.mlab.bivariate_normal(X, Y, 1.0, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0) Z2 = ...


11

First you construct a function, fourvar that takes those four parameters as arguments. In this case you could have done it with 3 variables one of which was lambda_2 over lambda_1. Alpha1 is fixed at 2 so alpha_1/alpha_2 will vary over 0-10. fourvar <- function(a1,a2,l1,l2){ a1* integrate( function(x) {(1-x)^(a1-1)*(1-x^(l2/l1) )^a2} , 0 , 1)$value } ...


11

I think your numbers are probably ok, the differences between them are moderately small. As the guy says in the video you link to (around 3min): To get some meaningful answers we take a log transform so if we do -np.sign(a)*np.log10(np.abs(a)) on the data you post above, we get: First image: [[ 0.16584062] [ 0.68441437] [ 0.96222185] [ 2.27570703] ...


10

Well, contourf handles it perfectly, it's contour that chokes. Why not just do this: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt xi = np.array([0., 0.5, 1.0]) yi = np.array([0., 0.5, 1.0]) zi = np.ones((3,3)) try: CS = plt.contour(xi, yi, zi, 15, linewidths=0.5, colors='k') except ValueError: pass CS = plt.contourf(xi, yi, zi, 15, ...


10

You can get the center of mass in the y direction by first calculating the Moments. Then the center of mass is given by yc = M01 / M00, where M01 and M00 are fields in the structure returned by the Moments call. If you just want the center of the bounding rectangle, that is also easy to do with BoundingRect. This returns you a CvRect and you can just take ...



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