Hot answers tagged

8

It's probably happening due to the irregular grid. Try interpolating the values first then doing the plot: library(ggplot2) library(akima) library(viridis) library(ggthemes) dat <- read.table("http://s000.tinyupload.com/download.php?file_id=01371475872599670620&t=0137147587259967062053048", header=TRUE) di <- interp(dat$x, dat$y, dat$z, ...


6

I finally found a proper solution to this long-standing problem (currently in Matplotlib 1.4.3), which does not require multiple calls to contour or rasterizing the figure. Note that the problem illustrated in the question appears only in saved publication-quality figures formats like PDF, not in lower-quality raster files like PNG. My solution was ...


5

I'm surprised you didn't see bwperim. Did you not try bwperim? This finds the perimeter pixels of all closed objects that are white in a binary image. Using your image directly from StackOverflow: im = im2bw(imread('http://i.stack.imgur.com/yAZ5L.png')); out = bwperim(im); imshow(out); We get:


5

You basically need to do two things, set the extent of the image you want in the background. If you dont, the coordinates are assumed to be pixel coordinates, in this case 0 till 600 for both x and y. So adjust you imshow command to: implot = subplot1.imshow(pyplot.imread(r'test.png'), interpolation='nearest', alpha=0.5, ...


5

To obtain your expected result, you have to use bwlabel to label connected components. Then, for each component, we will draw a single contour by using imfill to fill a hole in the component. This way will guarantee that you will draw a outer contour for each component. Using for to draw all possible component of a class. This is the code Img=ones(128,128); ...


4

The problem is most probably in matplotlib itself and you're not doing anything wrong. By experimenting a bit I found that if you multiply the input data by 1.01 or 0.999 the plot comes out right, but 1.001 or 0.9999 is not enough to fix the issue. Adding or subtracting a constant instead shifts the color but keeps the problem evident. As a wild guess ...


4

According to OpenCV documentation findContours uses "Suzuki, S. and Abe, K., Topological Structural Analysis of Digitized Binary Images by Border Following" The function retrieves contours from the binary image using the algorithm [Suzuki85]. I didn't find description of boundingRect algorithm but found this file in opencv repo 7.a. Straight ...


4

The vtkContourFilter is a - in your case - line representation that does not allow for any "inside/outside" filtering. What you want is the vtk.Threshold threshold = vtk.Threshold() threshold.SetInputConnection(extractSlice.GetOutputPort()) threshold.ThresholdRange = [37.35310363769531, 276.8288269042969] The above code is something out of my head, and ...


4

Here's a function that expands the x and y ranges to include the maximum extent of the density contours. The function works as follows: Create a plot object with x and y ranges expanded well beyond the data range, so that we can be sure the plot will include complete contour lines. Use ggplot_build to determine the min and max x and y values among all the ...


3

The thing to keep in mind is that Mathematica is formula-oriented and is programmed in terms of mathematical variables, while Matlab is numerically oriented and programmed in terms of matrices and arrays. To evaluate a function of two variables on a grid, it is necessary to first generate that grid explicitly in the form of arrays, and then to take care to ...


3

Here's hoping I'm not shooting a mosquito with a [very ugly] cannon, I recently made a Binning_Array class for a school project and I think it might be able to help you: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import binning_array as ba from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import axes3d data = np.loadtxt('test.cat') X = data[:,0] Y = data[:,1] Z = ...


3

I would treat the contour as a set of line segments and perform an intersection test between each line segment and your ray. Geometric tools has a very comprehensive library of intersections tests and I've used it successfully for many applications.


3

I guess there is some mistake in your code (according to your data you shouldn't do x = data[:1] but more x = data[..., 1]). With your of data, the basic steps I will follow to interpolate the z value and fetch an output as a geojson would require at least the shapely module (and here geopandas is used for the convenience). import numpy as np import ...


3

This approach works only on points. You don't need to create masks for this. The main idea is: Find defects on contour If I find at least two defects, find the two closest defects Remove from the contour the points between the two closest defects Restart from 1 on the new contour I get the following results. As you can see, it has some drawbacks for ...


3

Try factorizing the fill in stat_density2d() ggplot(iris, aes(x=Petal.Width, y=Petal.Length, fill=Sepal.Width)) + stat_density2d(geom="polygon", aes(fill = factor(..level..)))


3

Here is one way, it's not quite right but it's close. The idea is to make your own log spaced colour map. I do it by using linear interpolation between log spaced break points. It could probably be improved to use logarithmic interpolation (and maybe have better end cases): First I simulate some data (open to suggestions for simulating data that better ...


2

As stated in the comments you need to have complete data before you can calculate contours. Therefore you have to interpolate or replace your missing values in some way that makes sense in your case. I've provided a couple of options below, but you'd need to come up with rationale for using one method over another, and whether a more sophisticated ...


2

Yes they can; there are at least a couple of packages to help. I once tried to gather them all in a blog post, Ternary diagrams. Be sure to look at the various links and comments too. These seem to be the best options for Python: Marc Harper's python-ternary Veusz, a Python plotting library There are also some suggestions in another SO question: ...


2

There is no built-in function to do this (to my knowledge). You have to realize that in the general case you can't have lines that both represent iso-values and that are spaced with a fixed distance. This is only possible with plots that have special scaling properties, and again, this is not the general case. This being said, you can imagine to approach ...


2

If you want the points that make up the 3rd contour you can do the following: std::vector<cv::Point> my_contour = contours[2]; or you can just loop over all of the countours by doing: for (int i = 0; i < contours.size(); ++i){ double avg_x(0), avg_y(0); // average of contour points for (int j = 0; j < contours[i].size(); ++j){ // ...


2

As stated in the documentation for findContours Note: Source image is modified by this function. So, in your case, you are seeing some parts of the modified image, while other parts are covered, since you draw the small blobs as black. This snippet of code should clarify this: #include <opencv2\opencv.hpp> using namespace cv; int main() { ...


2

It seems that histogram2d takes some fiddling to plot the contour in the right place. I took the transpose of the histogram matrix and also took the mean values of the elements in xedges and yedges instead of just removing one from the end. from matplotlib import pyplot as plt import numpy as np fig = plt.figure() h, xedges, yedges = np.histogram2d(x, y, ...


2

I am the author of ternplot. As you have correctly surmised, ternpcolor does not do what you want, as it is built to grid data automatically. In retrospect, this was not a particularly wise decision, I've made a note to change the design. In the mean time this code should do what you want: EDIT: I've changed the code to find the intersection of two curves ...


2

I have played a bit with the file exchange submission https://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/2299-alchemyst-ternplot. if you just do this: [x,y]=meshgrid(0:0.1:1); Fxy = 2*x.^2 +3 *y.^2; ternpcolor(x(:),y(:),Fxy(:)) You get: The thirds axis is created exactly as you say (1-x-y) inside the ternpcolor function. There are lots of things ...


2

This isn't exactly a 3d representation (e.g. in rgl), but maybe it gets you started: library(maps) library(mapproj) library(akima) set.seed(11) n <- 500 x <- runif(n, min=-180,max=180) y <- runif(n, min=-90,max=90) z <- x^2+y^3 PARAM <- NULL PROJ <- "orthographic" ORIENT <- c(45,15,0) XLIM <- c(-180, 180) YLIM <- c(-90, ...


2

The way this is normally done in Python is by using comprehensions: approximations = [cv2.approxPolyDP(c, 0.02 * cv2.arcLength(c, True), True) for c in contours] quads = [apx for apx in approximations if len(apx) == 4] you could even get this in a single statement by nesting the aproximations in the quads comprehension, but this wouldn't ...


2

This turned out to be a longstanding bug in matplotlib.mplot3d that ignores path information when taking 2D contourf sets and extending them into 3D. This causes, under certain circumstances, paths with holes to render improperly when a path segment intended as a "move" is instead "drawn". I contributed a fix for this issue to matplotlib and this bug is ...


2

ggplot passes the aes from the first ggplot call to the rest of the geoms, unless told otherwise. So the error is telling you that it cannot find z inside stuff, and it still thinks that the z should be z from the initial call. There are a range of ways to fix this, I think the easiest way to fix it is to give each geom its data separately: ggplot() + ...


2

I would use a Canny Edge Detection, though you can easily experiment with the others that @therainmaker suggests. I would use ImageMagick which is free and installed on most Linux distros and also available for OS X and Windows. At the command line, you would use this: convert blob.png -canny 0x1+10%+30% result.png or this: convert blob.png -canny ...


2

Say if you want 10 levels, of the color map jet: import matplotlib.cm as cm cm.jet(np.linspace(0, 1, 10)) Out[31]: array([[ 0. , 0. , 0.5 , 1. ], [ 0. , 0. , 0.99910873, 1. ], [ 0. , 0.37843137, 1. , 1. ], [ 0. , 0.83333333, 1. , 1. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible