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9

tune.svm returns an object of class "tune": > class(tunedsvm) [1] "tune" Therefore the relevant help page is ?plot.tune. A little reading of this reveals several useful arguments for customisation: plot(tunedsvm, transform.x = log2, transform.y = log2, # log 2 scale for x and y transform.z = function(x) 1 - x, # convert error rate to ...


8

The trick is to apply the transformation on your vertices, but keep the same faces data. This way the faces always link the same points, regardless of their new positions. Since there are no sample data I took the Matlab example as a starting point. This is coming from the Matlab isosurface page (very slightly modified for this example): %// Generate an ...


5

Pass the labcex argument to contour with a desired scaling factor. As ?contour states, labcex is cex for contour labelling. contour(x, y, z, labcex=5)


4

Here is an example for you to start with: import pylab as pl import numpy as np import pandas as pd # prepare some random data N = 100 np.random.seed(0) weekday = np.random.randint(0, 7, N) week = np.random.randint(0, 40, N) activity = np.random.randint(0, 100, N) df = pd.DataFrame({"weekday":weekday, "week":week, "activity":activity}) ...


4

As @tonytonov has suggested this thread, the transparent areas can be deleted by closing the polygons. # check x and y grid minValue<-sapply(volcano3d,min) maxValue<-sapply(volcano3d,max) arbitaryValue=min(volcano3d$z-10) test1<-data.frame(x=minValue[1]-1,y=minValue[2]:maxValue[2],z=arbitaryValue) ...


4

It seems that the bottleneck is because of the two heavy nested loops there. The solution is of course vectorization with the intention to remove those two loops. One of the best tools for vectorization, bsxfun could be used here. The final vectorized implementation listed next ran in 1.323403 seconds at my end, whereas the original nested loopy version was ...


4

Your functions vec_dot and f do not vectorize well. The contour3d function passes in a vector of x, y, and z values and only calls the f function once. So rather than calling something like for(y in 1:10) {print( f(y/10,0,0) )} R typically passes in all the values it wants a once print( f(1:10/10,0,0) ) which, as you can see, only returns one value. ...


3

Change your fourth line into this, in accordance with the definition of L1 norm: z = abs(xm)+abs(ym); You could do it more efficiently using with bsxfun to avoid generating the matrices xm, ym: x = linspace(-1,1,10); y = linspace(-1,1,10); z = bsxfun(@plus, abs(x), abs(y).'); surfc(x,y,z) Either of the two approaches produces: For a better picture ...


3

The problem is that imshow creates "pixels", but the underlying data are just points (at the centers). Thus contour does not know anything about the image which imshow creates. However, you can create a similar image by upscaling the original data and then use contour on that. It is certainly a hack, but it achieves what you want. There remains a problem at ...


3

The contours and colours do not align because filled.contour produces two plots (legend and contour). After plotting, these coordinate systems are lost. (?filled.contour). This can be solved by adding the relevant commands to the plot.axes argument. Semi-circles can be drawn with draw.arc from the plotrix package, spokes with segments. The zone within a ...


3

You can select the "largest" contour by filling in the holes that each contour surrounds, figure out which shape gives you the largest area, then use the locations of the largest area and copy that over to a final image. As what Benoit_11 suggested, use regionprops - specifically the Area and PixelList flags. Something like this: im = ...


3

This could be one approach - %// Read in image as binary im = im2bw(imread('http://i.stack.imgur.com/a5Yi7.jpg')); im = im(40:320,90:375); %// clear out the whitish border you have figure, imshow(im), title('Original image') %// Fill all contours to get us filled blobs and then select the biggest one outer_blob = imfill(im,'holes'); figure, ...


3

Since my answer was pretty much all written out I'll give it to you anyway, but the idea is similar to @rayryeng's answer. Basically I use the Perimeter and PixelIdxList flags during the call to regionprops and therefore get the linear indices of the pixels forming the largest contour, once the image border has been removed using imclearborder. Here is ...


3

As highlighted by @Hooked this is the normal behaviour for a Delaunay triangulation. To remove unwanted triangles you should provide your own Triangulation by passing explicitly the triangles. This is quite easy in your case as your data is almost structured: I suggest performing a Delaunay triangulation in the plane (r, theta) then passing these triangles ...


3

Depending what you want to do, you could also use the RotatedRect. //you got your contour RotatedRect minRect = minAreaRect(contour); minRect.angle //angle from 0-90 Check out this thread, to see how you can compute the correct angle from that. This is probably only viable if you want to use a RotatedRect anyway and if your contours are close to a ...


3

The input to findContours() must be a single channel image. You can't pass it a 3 channel BGR image. The solution is to convert you input image to grayscale. eg. cvtColor( src, src_gray, CV_BGR2GRAY ); Of course it doesn't have to be a grayscale image, you could extract and use any single channel from an image using split() eg. Hue, Saturation, Value, B, ...


3

FindContours to extract the contours of your image. (convert your image to grayscale, apply binary threshold and canny edge detection before, for better results.) vector> contours; cv::findContours( src_img, contours, hierarchy, CV_RETR_TREE, CV_CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE ); Draw all the points of contour. Code example: cv::Mat draw = cv::Mat::zeros( 500,500, ...


3

The contour function internally creates a number of patch objects, and returns them as a combined hggroup object. So we could set the ZData of all patches by shifting in the Z-dimensions to the desired level (by default contour is shown at z=0). Here is an example: [X,Y,Z] = peaks; surf(X, Y, Z), hold on % plot surface [~,h] = contour(X,Y,Z,20); % ...


3

cvDrawContours() is from the old, deprecated c-api, you should not use it, or any of those old cv* functions. drawContours is from the current c++ api, use it with cv::Mat, functions from the cv:: namespace. also, stop worrying about CvSeq* or IplImage*. if you see any code that contains arcane stuff like that, - move on. "Would I be better off trying ...


3

Does plt.tricontourf(x,y,z) satisfy your requirements? It will plot filled contours for irregularly spaced data (non-rectilinear grid). You might also want to look into plt.tripcolor(). import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = np.random.rand(100) y = np.random.rand(100) z = np.sin(x)+np.cos(y) f, ax = plt.subplots(1,2, sharex=True, ...


3

for coll in covariance1.collections: coll.remove() then update.


2

You can use griddata from matplotlib.mlab to grid your data properly. import numpy as np from matplotlib.mlab import griddata x = np.array([0,0,1,1]) y = np.array([0,1,0,1]) z = np.array([0,10,20,30]) xi = np.arange(x.min(),x.max()+1) yi = np.arange(y.min(),y.max()+1) ar = griddata(x,y,z,xi,yi) # ar is now # array([[ 0., 20.], # [ 10., 30.]]) ...


2

This answer is taken almost entirely from the contour demo example: import numpy as np import matplotlib.cm as cm import matplotlib.mlab as mlab # for setting up the data import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # set up example data: delta = 0.025 x = np.arange(-3.0, 3.0, delta) y = np.arange(-2.0, 2.0, delta) X, Y = np.meshgrid(x, y) Z1 = ...


2

Thanks a lot! My fault was, that I did not realize, that I have to apply some function to the groupby dataframe, like .size(), to work with it... hdf = aggdf.groupby(['a','b']).size() hdf gives me a b 1 -2.0 1 -1.9 1 -1.8 1 -1.7 2 -1.6 5 ...


2

This is actually due to savefig's defaults. The figure can have a transparent background (e.g. try fig.patch.set(facecolor='none'); fig.canvas.print_png), but it's being overridden when you call plt.savefig. If you want a transparent background, you'll need to specify transparent=True in your call to savefig. Otherwise, it will override the figure's ...


2

Probably You want to set equal scale: ax.axis('equal') Edit Here's Your code: #!/usr/bin/python3 from matplotlib import pyplot as plt m = [[1,2,3,4], [2,3,4,5], [2,2,1,5]] fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111) ax.contourf(m) ax.axis('equal') fig.savefig("equal.png") matplotlib has three interfaces. Here's the same code written ...


2

You can also use griddata. %Generate random data x = rand(30,1); y = rand(30,1); z = rand(30,1); %Create regular grid across data space [X,Y] = meshgrid(linspace(min(x),max(x),n), linspace(min(y),max(y),n)) %create contour plot contour(X,Y,griddata(x,y,z,X,Y)) %mark original data points hold on;scatter(x,y,'o');hold off


2

First, I assume here that you know that your contours are plotted to the same scale and are not translated, so this isn't so much a problem of image matching as trying to find the difference between two awkward shapes. There are several ways to do this, both of which should give roughly the same result. The most accurate way is to take the inner product ...


2

In case the shapes are at the same positions in both images and you just need the markers on an image without additional information, this simple trick could do it. #include <opencv2/opencv.hpp> using namespace cv; int main() { Mat img1 = imread("D:/1.png"); Mat img2 = imread("D:/2.png"); Mat diff; absdiff(img1, img2, diff); ...


2

# reshape the data require(reshape2) dat <- melt(z) # use geom_raster to mimic image gg <- ggplot(dat, aes(x=Var2, y=Var1, fill=value)) gg <- gg + labs(x="", y="") gg <- gg + geom_raster() gg <- gg + coord_equal() gg <- gg + scale_fill_gradient(low="red", high="yellow") gg <- gg + scale_x_continuous(expand = c(0, 0)) gg <- gg + ...



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