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Olivier's answer is correct; I thought I might try to explain this more intuitively. Why does C# choose to use contravariance (not covariance) in input parameters in delegate? Because contravariance is typesafe, covariance is not. Instead of Base, let's say Mammal: delegate void MammalDelegate(Mammal m); This means "a function that takes a mammal ...


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Because, if you supply a delegate accepting a less derived input parameter, this method will get a parameter value having a type which is more derived than expected. And this works. On the other hand, if covariance was used, you could be supplying a delegate expecting a more derived type, but it might get a value of a less derived type. And this does not ...


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From C# 1.0, arrays where the element type is reference type are covariant. For example, the following statement in C# is OK. Animal[] animals=new Mammal[10]; In the above code, mammal can be stored in animals array as mammal is derived from Animal. But remember, this is only true for reference types. Why this covariance only for reference types but not ...


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Why is cons's parameter type wrong? trait List[+A] { def cons(hd: A): List[A] } Compiler give you error: covariant type A occurs in contravariant position in type A of value hd because method parameters count as contravariant positions, but A is covariant. Let's imagine that this method declaration would compile. Then we could do: class ListImpl[A] ...


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MyType : IMyType does not make Generic<IMyType> and Generic<MyType> related in any way. In your particular case it is likely that nodesT is FasterList<Node> which is not FasterList<INode>. Note that this conversion work for interface which support variance (co/contra) when you can specify in/out as you see in successful conversion ...


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In the scenario where you're calling QueryNodes<MyNode>, in order for your last cast to get a non-null value, the actual instance that you get with _nodesDB[type] must be a FasterList<MyNode>. It's not good enough for it to be FasterList<SomeOtherMostlyCompatibleNode>. The runtime is very strict about types, it keeps track of the actual ...


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It doesn't make sense for ValidatorClean to be covariant. Lets say you have: abstract class Animal object Animal { def validate[A <: Animal : ValidatorClean](animal: A): Animal = implicitly[ValidatorClean[A]].apply(animal) } class Cat { def canMeow: Boolean = ??? } class Dog { def canBark: Boolean = ??? } By making ...


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In C# this will throw a compiler error because C and B are not the same type with ImmutableList. In C#, classes are not co/contravariant, these are properties of Interfaces and Delegates used via the in and out keywords. Remember, in C#, a List<T> is a mutable list, and doesn't work like the immutable List[T] in Scala. What you can do is ...



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