Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

Rails uses a module called Inflector to convert singular names to plurals , cameilize and similar tasks. The module for example automatically map a person model to a people controller. You can add a new irregular rule for rails to pickup by adding in your config/initilizers/inflections.rb : #Be sure to restart your server when you modify this file ...


3

<ul> @for (int i = 0; i < Model.BulletPoints.Count(); i++) { <li class="ui-state-default" style="margin-bottom: 8px;"><span>@Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.BulletPoints[i], new { @maxlength = "200", @class = "form-control", @style = "width: 825px;max-width: 90%;" }) <div style="width: 70px; max-width: 10%; margin-top: -30px; ...


2

TLDR: this is because only the service layer in the application has the logic needed to identify the scope of a database/business transaction. The controller and persistence layer by design can't/shouldn't know the scope of a transaction. The controller can be made @Transactional, but indeed it's a common recommendation to only make the service layer ...


2

I really don't know what that Condition class is. It's possibly being used as a model attribute. As for ModelMap, its javadoc states Implementation of Map for use when building model data for use with UI tools. In Spring's MVC implementation, the ModelMap (and other Model... classes) serve as the intermediary for storing model elements between the ...


2

It depends on what the browser "ACCEPTs" when it's POSTing or GETing. In IE, by default will accept json, but in Chrome it will by default accept XML. Please see the ASP.NET Web API Tutorial for more information about how this works.


1

For your home definition, check first your user.rb (model) class. You should have: has_many :subscriptions If you have those, then your def home would become: def home @subscriptions = current_user.subscriptions # active record is magical subscriptions = @subscriptions.map(&:subreddit_id) @posts = Post.where('subreddit_id in (?)', ...


1

You can call $this->function(); in your method but it is not advised. The broken code you are speaking of, from what I understand is the HTML which is loaded fine, but the images/css etc are broken because you are not calling the files properly. Can you post a sample of HTML you get that is "broken" please? (from the browser, with view source or ctrl+U' ...


1

Use Eloquent to get Eloquent results like Model::find() etc. (DB::table... will return stdObject, that's the error you get), and correct these relations: // class Tecnico public function servicios(){ // the keys are wrong: // return $this->belongsToMany('Servicio', 'Servicio_Tecnico', 'idTecnico', 'idServicio'); // it should be like this: return ...


1

First: it's best to use the Eloquent model to query instead of DB::table. Eg: $tecnico = Tecnico::with('servicio')->where('Auth_Token',$auth)->firstOrFail(); The DB query builder doesn't know the Eloquent relationships. Eloquent only knows the Query builder. And second: don't pass access tokens in the URI. Not in a segment and not in the query ...


1

Maybe you could just improve your code by making an "app.controllers" module that will be in charge of loading all your controllers. Then in your app.js, you just add this module as dependency. So for instance. app/controllers/MyController.js: define(['angular'], function(angular) { return angular.module('app.controllers.MyCtrl', []) ...


1

I've updated your fiddler please see here [http://jsfiddle.net/8s9ss/4/] and below code as well. I hope that will help. Regards var app = angular.module('app', ['ui.bootstrap']); app.controller('ModalInstanceCtrl', function ($scope, $modalInstance, customer) { $scope.customer = customer; }); app.controller('CustomerController', function($scope, ...


1

If you do like this it will work: The user repository: class UserRepository { public function getProp() { return 'user prop'; } } The Base Controller class BaseController extends Controller { protected $user; protected $prop; public function __construct(UserRepository $user) { $this->user = $user; ...


1

Depends -- if you have to process that data in the controller, perhaps it's the right way. But as with most things, if you show us the code, we may be able to refactor. You need to be aware of modularity, which means you should split your code as much as possible, to encourage reuse Concerns are really for providing cross-controller / cross-model ...


1

Your best option in this case is probably to use form objects. A form object exists simply to abstract away the complex interactions that are occurring in your controller. This results in cleaner more maintainable code, among other great benefits. You can read more and find some excellent examples of the technique at ...


1

This is how I setup my modals for handleing items that I ng-repeat over and want to edit. I suggest setting it up to work with a different controller, because then you can use DI to inject the resolved item to the child scope. $scope.openModal = function(item) // This sets up some of the options I want the modal to open with var options = {} ...


1

You have to do all those mocks/stubs if you want to run those before_filters but I think, that, for those cases, is better to use some spec helper method to create a logged in user so, on your spec, you only need to call that method on a "before(:each)" block of your controller where you want a user. In spec_helper.rb: def current_user(stubs = {}) unless ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible