Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

ReSharper shows dead code. Although its detection algorithm isn't perfect, it is a good start, allowing you to skip any style which it shows as used. For any style which is shown as unused, you can then check if it actually is unused (ex. by searching through the solution).


3

Try set the Name for Borders and use TargetName in Trigger like this: <Style TargetType="{x:Type Button}"> <Setter Property="Background" Value="#f2f2f7"/> <Setter Property="Padding" Value="6,4"/> <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="#222222" /> <Setter Property="Template"> <Setter.Value> ...


3

Give the Border a name and use the TargetName property on the trigger setter. <Setter TargetName="MyBorderName" Property="BorderBrush" Value="Red" />


2

Unorthodox way of getting there would be to create an attached property which prints out who is using the ControlTemplate :) think about it like this: <ResourceDictionary xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" ...


2

There are a few options I can think of: The 'development time' solution: this includes searching every file for the existence of Style="{StaticResource StyleName}", or something similar. This will work in a lot of cases, but isn't automated and not very reliable; The runtime solution: You could instantiate every control in the class library, and iterate ...


1

You're referring to a WPF "Style." With styles, you define a set of properties that will be the same between all instances of a control which use that style. <Style x:Key="MyTextBoxStyle" TargetType="TextBox"> <Setter Property="Width" Value="120" /> <Setter Property="Height" Value="23" /> <Setter Property="TextWrapping" ...


1

To properly configure your layout, you should use WPF Layout Controls. In order to make the grid layout, you can use Grid, UniformGrid, etc., depending on your needs. In order to apply several properties to the all controls inside the layout control, you can define the Style in the Resources of that control, as was mentioned already: <Grid> ...


1

You can use VisualStudio and "Find in files" tool. Try to find style key, for example invertedCheckBox in entire solution. So you can determine where the style is used.


1

this is going to help you, but it has a lot of loss, so i suggest to you to read more about Styles And Templates <Button Name="Home" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Width="75" Background="#FF252525" BorderThickness="5"> <Button.Content> <Grid HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Bottom"> <TextBlock ...


1

You can try this trick: Create a proxy control for Binding: <Control x:Name="Proxy" Background="White" /> And use in Path binding like this: <Path x:Name="path1" Fill="{Binding Path=Background, ElementName=Proxy}" Data="..." /> When you're in the Trigger set the color for the Proxy, his tucked up all the Path's. Or instead of the ...


1

Your ToggleButton.IsChecked property is data bound to your IsSelected property so by default, you also want to set the TextBlock.Background when this IsSelected property is true. You can do that like this: <TextBlock Text="{Binding Name}" VerticalAlignment="Center" Margin="4,0,5,0" x:Name="tbText"> <TextBlock.Style> <Style ...


1

1) Using Canvas Resource to store path style. Please see <Trigger Property="IsEnabled" Value="False"> and <Trigger Property="IsEnabled" Value="True"> <Window.Resources> <ControlTemplate x:Key="buttonTemplate" TargetType="{x:Type Button}"> <Border x:Name="buttonBorder"> <Grid> ...


1

There is no need to inherit the button, you are not changing its functionality? You should simply create a Style that sets the content of the button and set it to all your buttons : <Style TargetType="{x:Type Button}"> <Setter Property="Content"> <Setter.Value> ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible