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102

Try this code which makes use of a cross product: public bool isLeft(Point a, Point b, Point c){ return ((b.x - a.x)*(c.y - a.y) - (b.y - a.y)*(c.x - a.x)) > 0; } Where a = line point 1; b = line point 2; c = point to check against. If the formula is equal to 0, the points are colinear. If the line is horizontal, then this returns true if the ...


47

Use the sign of the determinant of vectors (AB,AM), where M(X,Y) is the query point: position = sign( (Bx-Ax)*(Y-Ay) - (By-Ay)*(X-Ax) ) It is 0 on the line, and +1 on one side, -1 on the other side.


29

You look at the sign of the determinant of | x2-x1 x3-x1 | | y2-y1 y3-y1 | It will be positive for points on one side, and negative on the other (and zero for points on the line itself).


13

Take three of the points, and determine whether their triangle is clockwise or counterclockwise:: triangle_ABC= (A.y-B.y)*C.x + (B.x-A.x)*C.y + (A.x*B.y-B.x*A.y) For a right-handed coordinate system, this value will be positive if ABC is counterclockwise, negative for clockwise, and zero if they are collinear. But, the following will work just as well ...


8

Needs["ComputationalGeometry`"] pts = RandomReal[{0, 10}, {60, 2}]; Graphics[ { Point@pts, FaceForm[], EdgeForm[Red], Polygon@pts[[ConvexHull[pts]]] } ] or cpts = pts[[ConvexHull[pts]]]; AppendTo[cpts, cpts[[1]]]; Graphics[ { Point@pts, Red, Line@cpts } ]


8

I played a little with your JsFiddle, and ended up with this : JsFiddle Example. I just added svg.selectAll("path") .data(groups) .attr("d", groupPath) .enter().insert("path", "g") .style("fill", groupFill) .style("stroke", groupFill) .style("stroke-width", 100) .style("stroke-linejoin", "round") ...


8

So this code seems to do the trick, but could be simpler... Essentially, I first collect the vertex numbers from the hull. Then I compute the mean, recenter the dataset and sort it by the angle from the mean. ps = set() for x, y in hull: ps.add(x) ps.add(y) ps = numpy.array(list(ps)) center = vecs[ps].mean(axis=0) A = vecs[ps] - center h = ...


7

The trick with polyhedral algorithms is choosing one that fits with your input and your desired output, since there is more than one way to represent a polyhedron and converting between the representations can be expensive. In this case, you are starting with points and want to end with vertices, so the Graham scan algorithm to compute the vertices of the ...


7

I raised this question because I wasn't able to figure out a solution (it is not only today that I was dealing with the matter hehe), but after all I was able to manage the problem! I had to change the way I calculated the convex hull, using the index array form. So now we have a vector< int > instead a vector< Point >. This is the code I used (it ...


7

I think what you seek does not exist. The Overmars and vanLeeuwen algorithm is not that complicated, and it seems in some sense necessary. First, change the problem to maintaining the upper hull and the lower hull separately. Second, construct each by divide-and-conquer, but retain the intermediate tree structures, so that you know the hulls of the ...


7

Here an easy solution that requires only scipy: def in_hull(p, hull): """ Test if points in `p` are in `hull` `p` should be a `NxK` coordinates of `N` points in `K` dimension `hull` is either a scipy.spatial.Delaunay object or the `MxK` array of the coordinates of `M` points in `K`dimension for which a Delaunay triangulation will ...


7

Hi I am not sure about how to use your program library to achieve this. But there is a simple algorithm to achieve this described in words: create a point that is definitely outside your hull. Call it Y produce a line segment connecting your point in question (X) to the new point Y. loop around all edge segments of your convex hull. check for each of them ...


6

The vector (y1-y2,x2-x1) is perpendicular to the line, and always pointing right (or always pointing left, if you plane orientation is different from mine). You can then compute the dot product of that vector and (x3-x1,y3-y1) to determine if the point lies on the same side of the line as the perpendicular vector (dot product > 0) or not.


6

You can solve this problem using the DelaunayTri class and the pointLocation method. Here's an example: pointMatrix = rand(20,3); %# A set of 20 random 3-D points dt = DelaunayTri(pointMatrix); %# Create a Delaunay triangulation [X,Y,Z] = meshgrid(0:0.01:1); %# Create a mesh of coordinates for your volume simplexIndex = ...


6

I do not know what the best algorithm to find that polygon is, but the polygon you are looking for is called "Convex Hull". By searching for that, you should find a matching algorithm.


6

I would simply create a Polygon, and use its contains(Point) method. Why reinvent the wheel?


6

I would suggest first try an easier approach like quick hull. (Btw, the order for gift wrapping is O(nh) not O(n2), where h is points on hull and order of quick hull is O(n log n)). Under average circumstances quick hull works quite well, but processing usually becomes slow in cases of high symmetry or points lying on the circumference of a circle. Quick ...


5

Not sure exactly what is wanted. Maybe the code below will get you started. pts = RandomReal[{-10, 10}, {20, 2}] (* Out[1]= {{1.7178, -1.11179}, {-7.10708, -8.1637}, {8.74461, -2.42551}, {6.64129, -2.87008}, {9.9008, 6.47825}, {8.27081, 9.94116}, {9.97325, 7.61094}, {-2.7876, 9.70449}, {-3.69357, 0.0253506}, {-0.503817, -1.98649}, {6.3056, -1.16892}, ...


5

Standard convex hull algorithms are not defeated by the wrapping-around of the coordinates on the surface of the Earth but by a more fundamental problem. The surface of a sphere (let's forget the not-quite-sphericity of the Earth) is not a Euclidean space so Euclidean geometry doesn't work, and convex hull routines which assume that the underlying space is ...


5

You can use convhulln to compute the convex hull for dimensions grater than 2. If you want to plot the results, use trisurf. See the sample code for your input below: X = [x;y;z]'; %# involves a 3D point on each row K = convhulln(X); trisurf(K,X(:,1),X(:,2),X(:,3))


5

You can use Graham Scan to compute Convex hull of the given points. Once you have all the points on the convex hull you can eliminate the others. There are other algorithms as well for computing convex hull, but Graham scan is easy to implement and is O(n logn).


5

Here is what you want to do. Generating some random data: library(ggplot2) library(data.table) # You have to set the seed _before_ you generate random data, not after set.seed(1) dt <- data.table(xdata=runif(15), ydata=runif(15), level=rep(c("a","b","c"), each=5), key="level") Here is where the magic happens: hulls <- dt[, .SD[chull(xdata, ...


5

Kneejerk: if you build a leafy BSP tree and end up with all your geometry at one node, the object is convex. Slightly smarter way to approach the same solution: for each polygon, get the hyperplane. Make sure every vertex in the model is behind that hyperplane. Equivalently: check the line segment between every pair of vertices; if it doesn't intersect any ...


4

This is known as the Minimal Enclosing Circle problem (I'm puzzled why your google search didn't show up anything), and discussed here, here, here, and in many other places.


4

Polygon implements the Shape interface, which provides several contains() methods. Here's a simple example.


4

There's quite a lot out there, didn't you search? Here are a couple with O(n log h) runtime, where n is number of input points and h is number of vertices of the result: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chan%27s_algorithm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkpatrick-Seidel_algorithm Here is a demonstration of four methods, with links to the algorithms: ...


4

Looks like OpenCV Java API lacks another convexHull() signature: convexHull(MatOfPoint points, MatOfPoint hull); like it's possible to call in C++. While we haven't added it, you need to create the hull in MatOfPoint format manually: use MatOfPoint::toArray() or MatOfPoint::toList() to get contour's points use MatOfInt::toArray() or MatOfInt::toList() ...


4

I found out a nice method but it requires scipy 0.11.0 (sparse.csgraph) Here is a full example, the actual sorting are the 2 lignes following the "sort hull ..." comment. import numpy as np import scipy as sp # random point cloud and hull X = np.random.randint(0,200,(30,2)) hull = sp.spatial.qhull.Delaunay(X).convex_hull # sort hull indices using ...


4

In the current dev doc (0.13.0.dev) of scipy.spatial.ConvexHull, there is a vertices property which is counterclockwise in 2D.



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