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Namespacing the attribute using the cookbook name is merely a convention, in Chef attributes are designed to be overridden by other mechanisms, like wrapper cookbooks, roles or environments. Chef has rules about how node attributes are set and in the documentation it's call "precedence": https://docs.chef.io/attributes.html#attribute-precedence In brief ...


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Problem here is you are using an LWRP (that you must already have available in your Chef environment) and then hoping to run it as one or more other GIT branches (that are possibly not loaded in the Chef environment.) If you set up your branches right, you could include each branch as a different cookbook (see docs for Berkshelf or Librarian for details on ...


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Quoting the documentation source Ruby Type: String Optional. The path to a package in the local file system. So it's as simple as giving the correct path into the resource definition: rpm_package "package name" do source "/path/to/package_file.rpm" end


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You'll need some kind of artifact repository for "released" cookbooks that have their metadata baked in already. This is usually a Chef Server org that isn't used for anything else but holding cookbooks, and then a berks-api service pointed at that. This will still leave you unable to use pre-release versions though. Personally I just hand-curate my ...


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Two existing cookbooks for Jenkins would be the Chef Software cookbook (https://github.com/opscode-cookbooks/jenkins) and mine (https://github.com/poise/jenkins). In the future, you can use Google to find things like this or just search https://supermarket.chef.io/.


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I'm not sure you can override the node object in Chefspec without monkey patching, which I think is probably more trouble than it's worth. I really almost never even see node.attribute? used, so it may be somewhat of an anti-pattern. (Do you really care if it was set, vs. if it has a non-nil value or not?) I would just avoid using attribute? in the first ...


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Assuming you created a blank repo on your remote... (eg: Github or Gitlab) $ git clone [... cookbookname.git] $ cd cookbookname $ berks cookbook cookbookname .


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Here's the thing: Any facility you could use in Chef to run sudo with an allocated tty could also be used by anybody else, which means the requiretty directive in your sudoers is effectively useless. So you might as well just remove it and save yourself the trouble of working around it. Having said that, here are some ways to work around the problem: ...


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As such differences occur in many cases, there is even an example for this is included in chef's documentation about the service resource: service 'crond' do case node['platform'] when 'redhat', 'centos', 'scientific', 'fedora', 'amazon' service_name 'crond' when 'debian', 'ubuntu', 'suse' service_name 'cron' end action [:start, :enable] ...


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These are a few utility decorators I wrote on a tangent for a Python 2 project I was working on. The exceptions raised mirror, as closely as possible, the ones raised by functions in Python 3 that use the keyword-only arguments syntax. They don't disallow positional arguments, but they can require/restrict keyword arguments. You could create another ...


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The code you are using is valid syntax but for python3 so the book must be using python3 syntax, it allows keyword arguments only, pep-3102: python 3 new syntax You can also use a bare * in the parameter list to indicate that you don’t accept a variable-length argument list, but you do have keyword-only arguments. Using your code and passing a non ...


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You may not use the * alone. In the function declaration, it means "unpack any other unnamed argument in this variable", so you have to give it a variable name. You can achieve what you want by giving it a name, then checking it is empty, like this: class Reporter(object): def __init__(self, *args): assert not args, "Reporter.__ini__ only ...


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In python 2.*: Parameters names derived as variables name laws in any programming languages. but in python 2.* STAR sign used before parameters names for determining special situation and single STAR sign as a parameter name raising error. But in python 3.*: A parameter that equal to STAR can't assign any value to this and next position parameters ...


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A star (*) is not a valid Python 2.7 identifier, it's an operator. I think you made a mistake while copying a code from the cookbook. However, it's a valid code in Python 3, as Padraic Cunningham answered.


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The star operator (*) is used for unpacking. You can't use it as an argument. You may want to read Variable-Length Argument Tuples: Functions can take a variable number of arguments. A parameter name that begins with * gathers arguments into a tuple. For example, printall takes any number of arguments and prints them: def printall(*args): ...


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I would be very happy to be wrong about this but to the best of my knowledge there is no way to do orchestration like this with chef. Off the top of my head you could possibly set an attribute at the end of the run of each other recipe then have a guard at the start of your dependent recipe that checks to see if they are all true before running. i.e. ...



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