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65

It's not allowed, because as per the standard 21.4.1 p6, invalidation of iterators/references is only allowed for — as an argument to any standard library function taking a reference to non-const basic_string as an argument. — Calling non-const member functions, except operator[], at, front, back, begin, rbegin, end, and rend. For a COW ...


32

The answer is that yes, it does copy the string. Sort-of... Not really. Well, it depends on your definition of "copy"... >= 5.4 To see what's happening, let's look at the source. The executor handles a variable cast in 5.5 here. zend_make_printable_zval(expr, &var_copy, &use_copy); if (use_copy) { ZVAL_COPY_VALUE(result, ...


30

I was going to write up my own explanation but this Wikipedia article pretty much sums it up. Here is the basic concept: Copy-on-write (sometimes referred to as "COW") is an optimization strategy used in computer programming. The fundamental idea is that if multiple callers ask for resources which are initially indistinguishable, you can give them ...


23

The key idea behind implicit sharing seems to go around using the more common term copy-on-write. The idea behind copy-on-write is to have each object serve as a wrapper around a pointer to the actual implementation. Each implementation object keeps track of the number of pointers into it. Whenever an operation is performed on the wrapper object, it's ...


21

I think that more and more std::string implementations will move away from refcounting/copy-on-write as it is often a counter-optimization in multi-threaded code. See Herb Sutter's article Optimizations That Aren't (In a Multithreaded World).


19

"Copy on write" means more or less what it sounds like: everyone has a single shared copy of the same data until it's written, and then a copy is made. Usually, copy-on-write is used to resolve concurrency sorts of problems. In ZFS, for example, data blocks on disk are allocated copy-on-write; as long as there are no changes, you keep the original blocks; ...


16

I would use std::string. Promote decoupling from MFC Better interaction with existing C++ libraries The "return by value" issue is mostly a non-issue. Compilers are very good at performing Return Value Optimization (RVO) which actually eliminates the copy in most cases when returning by value. If it doesn't, you can usually tweak the function. COW has ...


16

Because it's a virtual address, not a physical one. Each process gets its own address space (for example, a 32-bit system may allow each process to have its own address space with the full 4G range). It's the memory management unit that will map virtual addresses to physical ones (and handle things like page faults if swapped out pages need to be bought ...


15

It's not Copy-on-Write, as strings are immutable. But sharing a string will not make a copy of the underlying memory region either. In Go, a string is represented as a (length, data) pair. If you pass a string around, Go will copy the length and the pointer but not the data pointed to. For further information, see this recent thread on golang-nuts.


13

In a multi-threaded environemnt (which is most of them nowadays) CoW is frequently a huge performance hit rather than a gain. And with careful use of const references, it's not much of a performance gain even in a single threaded environment. This old DDJ article explains just how bad CoW can be in a multithreaded environment, even if there's only one ...


12

Iterate over the collection choosing all the elements you want to delete and putting those in a temporary collection. After you finish iteration remove all found elements from the original collection using method removeAll. Would that work out for you? I mean, not sure if deletion logic is more complicated than that in your algorithm.


11

The STL actual requires that if you use reference counting that the semantics are the same as for a non reference counted version. This is not trivial for the general case.(Which is why you should not write your on string class). Because of the following situation: std::string x("This is a string"); char& x5 = x[5]; std::string y(x); x5 ...


11

Your code doesn't actually do: $a = (string)$a; It's more like this, because of copy-on-write semantics apply when the string is passed as a function argument: $b = (string)$a; There's a pretty big difference between those two statements. The first won't have any memory impact, whereas the second does ... usually. The following code does roughly what ...


10

There are several questions bundled into one here, so bear with me if I don't address them in the order you would expect. Most advice on SO says to use shared_ptr rather than regular pointers. Yes and No. A number of users of SO, unfortunately, recommend shared_ptr as if it were a silver bullet to solve all memory management related issues. It is not. ...


9

There's a series of articles about exactly this on Herb Sutter's More Exceptional C++ book. If you don't have access to it, you can try following through the Internet articles: part 1, part 2 and part 3.


9

Rather than trying to roll out your own solution, why not use a ConcurrentHashMap as your set and just set all the values to some standard value? (A constant like Boolean.TRUE would work well.) I think this implementation works well with the many-readers-few-writers scenario. There's even a constructor that lets you set the expected "concurrency level". ...


9

It is, CoW is an acceptable mechanism for making faster strings... but... it makes multithreading code slower (all that locking to check if you're the only one writing kills performance when using a lot of strings). This was the main reason CoW was killed off years ago. The other reasons are that the [] operator will return you the string data, without ...


9

The answers by Dave S and gbjbaanb are correct. (And Luc Danton's is correct too, although it's more a side-effect of forbidding COW strings rather than the original rule that forbids it.) But to clear up some confusion, I'm going to add some further exposition. Various comments link to a comment of mine on the GCC bugzilla which gives the following ...


8

Functional ("persistent") data structures are typically recursively built up out of immutable nodes (e.g. singly linked list where common suffixes are shared, search tree or heap where only the parts of the tree structure that are on the path from the root to the updated item need copying). Anything where the entire set has to be copied for every ...


8

You'll want to create a file on disk or a POSIX shared memory segment (shm_open) for the block. The first time, map it with MAP_SHARED. When you're ready to make a copy and switch to COW, call mmap again with MAP_FIXED and MAP_PRIVATE to map over top of your original map, and with MAP_PRIVATE to make the second copy. This should get you the effects you want. ...


7

As stated by Martin & Michael, Copy On Write (COW) is often more trouble than it's worth, for further reading see this excellent article by Kelvin Henney about Mad COW Disease and I believe it was Andrei Alexandrescu that stated that Small String Optimization performs better in many applications (but I can't find the article). Small String Optimization ...


7

Good, following the advice of MarkR, I gave it a shot to go through the pagemap and kpageflags interface. Below a quick test to check whether a page is in memory 'SWAPBACKED' as it is called. One problem remains of course, which is the problem that kpageflags is only accessible to the root. int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { unsigned long long ...


7

If fork is called multiple times from the original parent process, then each of the children and parent will have their pages marked as read-only. When a child process attempts to write data then the page from the parent process is copied to its address space and the copied page is marked as writeable in the child but not in the parent. If fork is called ...


6

No one could say more clear: http://qt.nokia.com/doc/4.6/implicit-sharing.html It is common practice to realize containers this way.


6

You are correct, a copy would be made in all four examples (L1, L2, and the two below), even though for the latter two it's unnecessary. Unfortunately when the non-const version of operator[] is called or a non-const iterator is dereferenced, there is no way for the implementation to tell whether or not the resulting non-const reference will be used to ...


6

std::auto_ptr does not having any thread-safety guarantees when calling a non-const member such as reset() as you are suggesting. Moreover, neither does std::unique_ptr which you should consider as a replacement for auto_ptr as auto_ptr is effectively deprecated. std::shared_ptr does provide such thread-saftey guarantees. What you are typically guaranteed ...


6

Surprisingly, it does create a copy: $string = "TestMe"; debug_zval_dump($string); $string2 = $string; debug_zval_dump($string); $string3 = $string; debug_zval_dump($string); $string4 = (string) $string; debug_zval_dump($string); $string5 = (string) $string; debug_zval_dump($string); Output: string(6) "TestMe" refcount(2) string(6) "TestMe" ...


6

Copy-on-write and move semantics are completely different concepts, each serving a different purpose. While there is a common use case: returning an object from a function, in which because the original goes out of scope it is effectively a move, in the general case they differ: With copy on write multiple objects that are alive at the same time can share ...


6

This is because magic comes with a price. QString doesn't copy entire string, but it calculates references. Many copyings of QString can slow down the program. If const QString& is sufficient for your needs, why not use it? It is still faster.


6

The string class provided by the C++ standard library, for example, was specifically designed to allow copy-on-write implementations That is half-truth. Yes, it started design with COW in mind. But in the rush the public interface of std::string was messed up. Resulting it getting COW-hostile. The problems were discovered after the standard published, ...



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