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63

First, I assume you've already heard of the Church-Turing thesis, which states that anything we call “computation” is something that can be done with a Turing machine (or any of the many other equivalent models). So a Turing-complete language is one in which any computation can be expressed. Conversely, a Turing-incomplete language is one in which there is ...


23

Coq is an interactive theorem prover (aka proof assistant). It provides a language to write mathematical definitions, algorithms and theorems. It also provides an environment for producing machine checked proofs. Coq has been used to formalize mathematical theorems, and provide the semantics of programming languages. Today, we can find many papers at POPL ...


12

Generally, when you do a case analysis in a theorem prover, a lot of the cases boil down to "cannot happen". For example, if you are proving some fact about the integers, you may need to do a case analysis of whether the integer i is positive, zero, or negative. But there may be other hypotheses lying around in your context, or perhaps some part of your ...


10

In order to mimic your informal proof, i use the classic axiom ¬¬P → P (called NNPP) [1]. After applying it, you need to prove False with both A : ¬(∀ x:U, φ x) and B : ¬(∃ x:U, φ x). A and B are your only weapons to deduce False. Let's try A [2]. So you need to prove that ∀ x:U, φ x. In order to do that, we take an arbitrary t₀ and try to prove that φ t₀ ...


10

This is a general problem when you need to induct over a hypothesis with a dependent type (sub_type (c_typ u) (c_typ v)) whose parameters have a particular structure (c_typ u). There is a general trick, which is to selectively rewrite the structured parameter to a variable, keeping the equality in the environment. set (t1 := c_typ u) in H; assert (Eq1 : t1 ...


9

Certified Programming with Dependent Types has a section on creating a verified regular expression matcher. Coq Contribs has an automata contribution that might be useful. Jan-Oliver Kaiser formalized the equivalence between regular expressions, finite automata and the Myhill-Nerode characterization in Coq for his bachelors thesis.


8

Goal forall (f:bool -> bool) (b:bool), f (f (f b)) = f b. Proof. intros. remember (f true) as ft. remember (f false) as ff. destruct ff ; destruct ft ; destruct b ; try rewrite <- Heqft ; try rewrite <- Heqff ; try rewrite <- Heqft ; try rewrite <- Heqff ; auto. Qed.


8

There are two languages in Coq- Gallina, the term language, and the administration language called the Vernacular. Gallina files end in .g while Vernacular files end in .v


8

Most of the software written during computer science research is a prototype that is not developed much further than what is needed to make the scientific point of the article, validating your approach. Some exceptions end up being maintained for a long time and living the complex life of becoming something people depend on (OCaml is one such example), but ...


8

Your intuition for bool_ind is spot on, but thinking about why bool_ind means what you said might help clarify the other two. We know that bool_ind : forall P : bool -> Prop, P true -> P false -> forall b : bool, P b If we read this as a logical formula, we get the same reading you did: For ...


8

When you see a family of types, you may wonder whether each of the arguments it has are parameters or indices. Parameters are merely indicative that the type is somewhat generic, and behaves parametrically with regards to the argument supplied. What this means for instance, is that the type List T will have the same shapes regardless of which T you ...


7

Moreira, Pereira & de Sousa, On the Mechanisation of Kleene Algebra in Coq gives a nice verified construction of the Antimirov derivative of regexps in Coq. It's pretty easy to read off a CFA from this construction, and to compute the intersection of regexps. I'm not sure why you separate Coq from dependently typed programming: Coq essentially is ...


7

Inductive naturals : Type := | Z : naturals | N : naturals -> naturals. says the following things: Z is a term of type naturals when e is a term of type naturals, N e is a term of type naturals. Applying Z or N are the only two ways to create a natural. When given an arbitrary natural, you know that it was either made from one or from the other. ...


7

tl;dr Cardinality arguments are the only way to show types unequal. You can certainly automate cardinality arguments more effectively with a bit of reflection. If you want to go further, give your types a syntactic representation by constructing a universe, ensuring your proof obligations are framed as syntactic inequality of representations rather than ...


7

Thanks to Prof. Pierce's summer 2012 video 4.1 as Dan Feltey suggested, we see that the key is that the theorem to be extracted must provide a member of Type rather than the usual kind of propositions, which is Prop. For the particular theorem the affected construct is the inductive Prop ex and its notation exists. Similarly to what Prof. Pierce has done, ...


7

You seem to be a bit confused about Prop. is_le x y is of type Prop, and is the statement x is less or equal to y. It is not a proof that this statement is correct. A proof that this statement is correct would be p : is_le x y, an inhabitant of that type (i.e. a witness of that statement's truth). This is why it does not make much sense to pattern match on ...


7

A proof assistant like Coq will verify that your proof is sound and that any theorems you propose can (or cannot) be derived using axioms and previously proven results. It will also provide you with support in proposing proof steps to reduce the effort you have to make to discharging the proofs. A model checker, in contrast, symbolically enumerates the ...


6

The "Function" plugin is still very experimental. In the documentation you can find term0 must be build as a pure pattern-matching tree (match...with) with λ-abstractions and applications only at the end of each branch. But I have to agree that this error message is far from being explicit (normally such error messages should either end with "Please ...


6

In fact, it is easier to do an induction on the SubSet judgment directly. However, you need to be as general as possible, so here is my advice: Lemma proof1: forall (A:Type) (x:A) (l1 l2:list A), SubSeq l1 l2 -> InL x l1 -> InL x l2. (* first introduce your hypothesis, but put back x and In foo inside the goal, so that your induction hypothesis ...


6

How to discard impossible cases? Well, it's true that the first two obligations are impossible to prove, but note that they have contradicting assumptions (zero <> zero and one <> one, respectively). So you will be able to prove those goals with tauto (there are also more primitive tactics that will do the trick, if you are interested). ...


6

As danportin mentioned, Coq is telling you that it does not know how to instantiate y. Indeed, when you do rewrite -> neg_move, you ask it to replace some negb x by a y. Now, what y is Coq supposed to use here? It cannot figure it out. One option is to instantiate y explicitly upon rewriting: rewrite -> neg_move with (y:=some_term) This will perform ...


6

It would be helpful if you could elaborate on exactly what you'd like to achieve. Some impredicative uses (such as this example from the Haskell wiki) are relatively easy to encode using an additional nominal type with a single generic method: type IForallList = abstract Apply : 'a list -> 'a list let f = function | Some(g : IForallList) -> ...


6

It seems that you do not have a good grasp of what disjunctive patterns are about. In OCaml Let us say, for example, that I have, in OCaml, defined a type either: type either = Left of int | Right of int Hence, a value of type either is just an integer tagged with either Left or Right. One obvious function that I can now write is int_of_either, which ...


5

See Perl Regular Expression Matching is NP-Hard Regex matching is NP-hard when regexes are allowed to have backreferences. Reduction of 3-CNF-SAT to Perl Regular Expression Matching [...] 3-CNF-SAT is NP-complete. If there were an efficient (polynomial-time) algorithm for computing whether or not a regex matched a certain string, we ...


5

You probably want to define the following function (even if you annotate it properly you [le_S m n x] does not have the type you want) : Fixpoint lesseq (m n : nat) : option (m <= n) := match n with | 0 => match m with | 0 => Some (le_n 0) | S m0 => None end | S p => match ...


5

true = false is a statement equating two different boolean values. Since those values are different this statement is clearly not provable (in the empty context). Considering your proof: you arrive at the stage where the goal is false = true, so clearly you won't be able to prove it... but the thing is that your context (assumptions) are also contradictory. ...


5

This lemma is in the standard library: Require Import Arith. Lemma not_lt_refl : forall n:nat, ~n<n. Print Hint. Amongst the results is lt_irrefl. A more direct way of realizing that is info auto with arith. which proves the goal and shows how: intro n; simple apply lt_irrefl. Since you know where to find a proof, I'll just give a hint on how to ...


5

If that's really what you want to do, I suspect you want first to prove a helper Fixpoint subtreelist (st : searchtree): list (...) that returns a list of all these subtrees, and then a tactic that calls subtreelist and recursively destructs the list untill you have all the extra hypotheses you want. Good luck with that!


5

liftM2 {A B R : Set} `{Monad m} (f : A -> B -> R) (ma : m A) (mb : m B) : (m R) or liftM2 `{Monad m} `(f : A -> B -> R) (ma : m A) (mb : m B) : (m R) The second one changes the order of implicit arguments, but I think it is reasonable. For an explantion of the `{} syntax, see here. The main difference is that the name, rather than the type ...



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